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jolima71
01-11-2007, 00:19
as it is almost that time of year again i was thinking back to when i was a kid, we used to make a guy , we used a pair of tights stuffed with newspaper for the head and legs , and a jumper tied at the wrists stuffed with newspaper too .then he usually had a jacket and trousers on, we used to take him to the neighbours and get pennies (penny for the guy) and also sit on the end of our banjo with him then after he used to go on the bonfire,
we used to have a few fireworks the catherine wheel never used to work lol,
and mum used to make savoury suprise (she got the recipe from blue peter) it was sliced potatoe and onions i think there might of been some milk? and topped with cheese in a casserole and then in the oven for hours, she used to do jacket potatoes too in the oven so the skins where hard,
can anyone else remember making guys??
and does anyone still make them with their children ?
or was it just the 70's and 80's era?

joybee
01-11-2007, 01:22
Oh yes Jolima ! We had lots of fun as kids making the Guy much the way you did, then we'd take it to the top of our street at it's junction with the main road and sit waiting for people to come past on their way from the factories. I live in the Potteries, so when I was a little girl there were loads of PotBanks in the area. Later in the evening we'd move the Guy to the outside of our local - a very small pub just opposite our house, and wait for the slightly squiffy old men to come out and give us coppers.:p

All the neighbourhood kids would use the same bonfire built on the 'Marl Hole' A large open space that was used to tip waste from the factories. The annual 'Wakes' (fair) was held there too. The bonfire was HUGE !! And everyone took their few fireworks with them and all the Dads had great fun setting them off for us. Hey Ho ! Those were the days :D

Heather74
01-11-2007, 10:59
We also made a Guy to burn(using mum's american tan tights) on the Bonfire as kids, we had quite a big fire at the bottom of our garden, we would go wood collecting a few weeks before, then the Guy would take position on top.
All the family and neighbours kids would come to us with their fireworks to be set off, I can just smell it now. We would have Jacket potatoes, cheese and beans, to warm us up.
I look back on Bonfire night with fond memories, we also did out share of "Penny for the Guy", spending hours on the bus stop.
We don't make one with our children as our gardens not big enough for a fire, we do however have a few fireworks with all the family at mum's house.:)

Heather74
01-11-2007, 11:06
I also remember getting up the next morning and collecting all the spent shells of the fire works, not sure why LOL

jolima71
01-11-2007, 11:40
I also remember getting up the next morning and collecting all the spent shells of the fire works, not sure why LOL

LOL now that you mention it i remember doing that too but same as you Not sure why hee hee

joybee
01-11-2007, 18:17
Just re read your Leader Jolima and yes, there are still Guys out there on the streets ! I work at the Co-op near to where I live and as we speak there is a gang of three small boys of about 10 outside the main door with theirs !:)

HG
01-11-2007, 20:25
I also remember getting up the next morning and collecting all the spent shells of the fire works, not sure why LOL

I did that too, think i liked the smell of them.

Heather74
01-11-2007, 20:55
What a Generation :D

rossobantam
01-11-2007, 21:51
I grew up in the middle of the countryside...we had a 'farm' of sorts....and every year we had the BEST bonfires...plenty of trees/bushes to be cleared & burnt

we always had soup, bangers mash & beans...then bonfire toffee & Parkin

and 'cos the land was so flat in our area, we could see all the other bonfires in the distance....like beacons of old

Dave
:)

Wil
02-11-2007, 13:10
I also remember getting up the next morning and collecting all the spent shells of the fire works, not sure why LOL

I mentioned this to a workmate the other day and he did it too. There was definitely a oneupmanship in who could find the most (or the most complete) shell the next day.

On the night itself we'd also go around and down all the local alleyways to see if we could catch a glimpse of other people's displays!

joybee
03-11-2007, 22:58
WOW ! I'm shattered ! We have just finished our bonfire bash and I've just thrown my last family members out (Heather & kids !!) Eleven adults, nine kids round a bonfire in the garden with a smashing firework display. We all enjoyed hot dogs and burgers (and a little alcohol) The kids thought it was great Think the dishes and tidying up can wait till tomorrow ;)

spadino
05-11-2007, 16:43
Ahh yes I remember it well. My Guy had a very slim passing resemblance to anything human shaped but I insisted on making it myslef without any help! I would taipse down to a junction in Radford In Nottingham where we lived and there we would catch the workers changing shifts at Raleigh Bicycles and John Player cigarettes, LOADS of pennies for Fireworks! For food on the night we would get Baked potatoes, bonfire toffee which was incredibly hard! Flapjacks baked apples, and lots of sweets that were only available at that time of year 'winter toffee and the such. I always remembered I could wait for my bath that week until bofire night and go to bed all clean and warm with a big smile on my face. So many things have now been designated unsafe by the powers that be but we were okay, as long as you had a responsable adult there! Does anyone remember the adverts that the Fire Brigade put out about keeping fireworks in a biscuit tin with a lid? Wear a glove and light them at arms length and to keep a bucket of water or sand handy?

jolima71
06-11-2007, 11:29
Lol yep i remember those adverts,
i also remember 1 year that the firebrigade came to our house as i bonfire was so big they had got the hose out and came running over then 1 said wait a minute did you call us and dad said no and he had his hose on the tap anyway so they went not sure who called them lol but luckily 1 thought to ask before extinguishing it lol

kazboot
18-10-2009, 15:48
I have many memories like these.
We always had a big party on the night with loads of fireworks, a massive bonfire, jacket spuds baked in foil in the fire, our home made Guy used for 'Penny For The Guy' by my brother all week finally ceremoniously dumped on top of the fire, looking for the shells in the streets the next day.

Do any of you remember the unbelievably dangerous Jumping Jack firework that chased you round the garden? :eek:
Or the Banger being thrown behind you and making you jump when it exploded?
I think both of these were banned by the early 70s, thank goodness!

I also remember fireworks like Air Bombs being much louder than today.

Shirl
18-10-2009, 19:37
They are not the same today, no colour in them at all, no bang, the cathrin weel do not spin so long, the rockets are terrible, i use to love the jumping jack i remember running round the garden because i was never to sure were it was going to jump to next.:)

amethyst
18-10-2009, 19:55
I remember the jumpin jack chasing you round the garden,catherine wheel,sparklers,roman candle,home made soup to keep you warm,the smell of smoke the following morning:rolleyes:

Marine Boy
18-10-2009, 20:56
Yes, those jumping jacks! At one time, there would have been me and two younger brothers, plus assorted members of the family and sometimes those fireworks got awfully close. We just thought it great fun but I suppose, in retrospect, they were quite dangerous.

My favourite November 5th party was one put on be my Dad's firm, probably around 1970. The bonfire was immense and there was a van dispensing jacket potatoes and hotdogs. We were all dressed in thick jumpers and coats and the atmosphere was electric.

moonvisage
20-10-2009, 22:08
I remember bonfire night as a child.We use to spend weeks beforehand, building it up,with anything and everything we could find that would burn.Most small community bonfires were wonderful,as adults use to organize them and build them up,ensuring absolute safety.All the local children and teenagers use to join in,and spend most days searching for things.Bonfires certainly stopped all kinds of trouble for the month before and a week or so after,as most kids use to spend all their time building it,and afterwards,spend all their time remembering it and standing around the embers and charred ground,talking about next years bonfire.
I use to love the next day,fingering the embers and looking for dead firework shells.I still go looking for dead fireworks after bonfire night,as i love the smell of them.There is nothing better for a community,than building a bonfire,as the fun,excitement and smells are as spectacular as the actual sight of the bonfire and fireworks themselves.
I still remember how all the local violent thugs teens,never caused trouble on the run up to bonfire night,or afterwards.That says a lot for bonfire night and how good it is for communities.

magneticfly
20-10-2009, 22:23
when we were young though it was different.The seasons have changed now, but back then bonfire night could be relied on to be very nippy and you needed gloves scarves, mugs of soup baked potatoes cocoa etc.

in the past few years i have known bonfire nights which were almost warm and certainly not with the breath hanging in the air which i well remember

also in those days we didnt come back into a fully heated house like we do now and it was a contrast to have warm mugs and excitement outside then go indoors where it was chilly and race back into bed.


Also a penny in those days really was worth having, you could buy things with it! four aniseed balls!!!!!!

plus there wasnt the paranoia of not letting children out which prevails now, kids could hang about on street corners with guys.


Its like christmas, although i know even back then it was rare to actually have snow on christmas day, the winter was at least cold.Recently we have had warm christmas days, its just not the same, not festive at all

back the the chill on bonfire night to us kids heraded the start of winter and the run up to christmas, now its just much of a muchness weather wise.

Richard1978
20-10-2009, 22:35
When I was young my family and a few others used to organise bonfire parties & each bring a box of fireworks.

Also the the was (& still is ) a local bonfire & professional firework display in the local park on the nearest saturday, with the ticket money going to charity.

We used to go every year, though it was a labour of sometimes, especially as the park would end up a sea of mud & it was a long walk up a steep hill to my old house.

sixtyten
22-10-2009, 22:40
We also went to the big display and bonfire. I loved it as a Kid!
I have the same memories as everyone else, the Spuds in foil, collecting the dead shells..happy days

Remember to use the Fireworks Code :)

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p224/tracyc_2007/astra.jpg

Richard1978
22-10-2009, 23:16
Did anyone have a slide show at school around bonfire night.

I remember the fire brigade showing one most years, with plenty of tips on how to stay safe, & lots of scary photos of people with burns caused by messing with fireworks.

sixtyten
22-10-2009, 23:20
Yes, the Fire Brigade would regularly come in and warn us of the dangers of Fire.
I recall one year, the Head master dragging a kid who had been caught mucking around with fireworks and burnt himself, up in front of the School in Assembly. He made him wear his burnt clothes from that night.
It worked!
I never ever mucked about with them after seeing that

sixtyten
25-10-2009, 00:34
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p224/tracyc_2007/firew.jpg

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p224/tracyc_2007/fw.jpg

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p224/tracyc_2007/00022.jpg

davidthomas27
28-10-2009, 18:45
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh151/david5_2008/EdBanger1.jpg
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh151/david5_2008/EdBanger2DYR.jpg
(The second picture is smaller because I had trouble uploading the bigger version to Photobucket).

stud1al
10-11-2009, 02:07
I remember Guy Fawkes night.I loved that but that's another thing that's been banned in Australia.

I remember when i was back in England a friend of mine, his name was Guy Bangay or something like that, almost lost his sight after he lit a firework and then,when it didn't go off as quickly as he expected,bent down to have a look.
It went off in his face.

Danny
10-11-2009, 12:58
I remember early teens when we used to hold lit bangers in our hands -the chicken was the one who dropped his first - it really hurts your fingers when they explode but we were the last generation of 'the cane' so it was the macho thing to act unmoved and like it never hurt!

Richard1978
10-11-2009, 14:30
Greater Manchester Fire Brigade had (& might still have) a mascot called Wellyphant who often featured in their fire prevention posters.

steveffisher
17-11-2009, 15:12
Almost ashamed to say we made our own! Joke & Fancy dress shop on seafront in Margate wasn't too particular about who it sold fireworks to in the 80's, to be honest. Chinese rockets and bangers were the best, but we got whatever we could afford. Standard bangers were the best - raspberry coloured wrapper and purplish touchpaper. Anyway, I digress ...

We'd empty out all the powder from the fireworks and compress it into film pots (you know, the little black ones with the grey lids). We'd make a hole in the lid and fashion our own touchpaper. And because we'd mixed the powder from various fireworks, you never knew what you were gonna get.

We'd light them then retreat. Great fun. Great, great fun. And something to tell your mates the day after at school.

NOTE: DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME, KIDS!

sally 1973
02-12-2009, 12:03
Does anyone remember that advert in the late 70's/early 80's? about a boy who puts a firework in his pocket and it goes off. The end of the ad used to show this poor wretch of a kid showing his gloved hand with a couple of fingers missing. lol. Used to freak me out as a kid.:mad:

davidthomas27
04-08-2017, 15:11
http://i.imgur.com/gq5EqQO.jpghttp://i.imgur.com/qzruS40.jpg

zabadak
07-08-2017, 14:04
My earliest bonfire night was of going to a family friend's house and having a spark go down my back, making me cry! :D

staffslad
07-08-2017, 14:43
Anyone remember those fireworks that would rise vertically then shoot across horizontally? We called them helicopters but not sure if that was their actual name. I think they were banned quite a while ago. Also, I used to love that distinctive smell when opening a box of fireworks.

zabadak
08-08-2017, 13:35
Not the same since bangers were banned! :mad:

big kid
08-08-2017, 17:21
did anyone make banger guns ?

Mulletino
09-08-2017, 02:05
Nah but we used to strap pipes to our BMXs and use them to launch mini-rockets.

One year we got a big box of Bangers from a mate of my dad's who used them in their reenactments (some boat thing), some were damp so we got all th gunpowder out of those and genied it, massive pile it was.
Some we put inside our Airfix kits and blew them up, the rest got saved for Fireworks Night in a neighbour's garden where we were lighting them and throwing them in the fire, seeing who could hold onto it the longest.

We bought boxes of them and chased each other round the common firing them at each other. Then made a bonfire with all the aerosol cans we'd collected in the preceding months and had to stand round it facing outwards while the cans exploded and wizzed past us!

Fireworks night we also used to take my dad's shotguns into the garden and fire them into the air.

Last one we had in a mates' garden (about 2003) we had all sorts of issues, rockets falling over and launching at us all, the catherine wheel falling off the fence so my mate tried to stamp it out but the nail went into his shoe so he came hopping down the garden with it spinning on his shoe! XD.

I miss fireworks night.

big kid
09-08-2017, 07:37
I miss fireworks night.

same here. it was the one night of the year were everyone in the neighbourhood used to get together and have a good time. i think the last bonfire that we had was back in 1993. there's nowhere to have them since the council started going mad building houses here. there and everywhere.

darren
09-08-2017, 14:21
Bonfire night is still common here.

I watch from my bedroom across the road as the huge bonfire burns tons of people watching it and a bit too much drink is consumed.

Wood tyres etc burning.

staffslad
19-08-2017, 19:13
I don't think it is quite the same without your own bonfire. We used to have one every year on our garden, or if we were at a friend/relative's house they would also have one. Speaking for myself, I am not a fan of organised bonfires and displays. Yes, they may be more spectacular, but I prefer my own. Even the last few years when my son was young enough to want to stay with us for Bonfire Night and we didn't have a traditional bonfire, we still put a pile of old wood and bits and pieces in an old metal dustbin and lighted it so we had a fire. You can't do that now most people have plastic wheelies.

Richard1978
20-08-2017, 13:28
I remember when I was young one person would invite all the families around, with everyone contributing some food & a box of fireworks.

big kid
20-08-2017, 19:13
I remember when I was young one person would invite all the families around, with everyone contributing some food & a box of fireworks.

thats what we did. great times back then and a good community spirit.

Twocky61
21-08-2017, 09:11
All of us residents on our close had a communal fireworks display at the end of the close where more houses were being built

staffslad
21-08-2017, 16:00
In the 70s there used to be a fireworks competition shown on TV on or around Bonfire Night. I think there were displays from different countries. It strikes me now why would overseas countries have displays on Bonfire Night? Australia, New Zealand and Canada I could understand--if they celebrate Bonfire Night at all--but I think they were European countries.

Richard1978
21-08-2017, 18:09
I thought Bonfire Night on the 5th Of November was mostly a British thing, & maybe spread to some other Commonwealth countries.

Many other countries have firework displays for other important occasions.

staffslad
21-08-2017, 19:13
I am not sure if Australia, Canada and New Zealand celebrate 5th November, but the programme I recall had displays from european countries and was shown around Bonfire Night. Probably mid-70s. I specifically remember missing it one year as we went to a friend's house to their bonfire.

Mulletino
22-08-2017, 01:04
It's not celebrated here in Australia.

Donald the Great
10-12-2017, 00:54
It used to be celebrated in Australia when I was a kid. Never missed Bonfire Nite. One of the male residents selected a spot for the bonfire and us kids would then spend all day collecting old wooden junk and anything else that would burn. When we were finished there was a huge pile just waiting for the torch. Each of our fathers would bring along the fireworks and they would be set up for the evenings entertainment. Come nite fall and our dads would lite her up. There were all sorts of firework displays including everyone's fave the Kathrine Wheel. Oh what joy this was for us kids as the rockets were lit and flew skyward as the other firewords were given life.

Danniella
12-12-2017, 19:08
I love Bonfire Night too Donald. It's a big event here, complete with home made treacle toffee, i used to make Guy Fawlkes out of my old clothes stuffed with newspapers. I love fireworks too! ����

Donald the Great
12-12-2017, 23:14
I love Bonfire Night too Donald. It's a big event here, complete with home made treacle toffee, i used to make Guy Fawlkes out of my old clothes stuffed with newspapers. I love fireworks too! ���� yum..home made treacle toffee. That would play havoc with my no sugar diet I bet. We also had a huge Guy Fawkes figure made of wood, old clothes and straw. Guy was the last thing to burn at the end of Bonfire Nite.����

staffslad
06-11-2018, 12:59
Bonfire Night was last night and I was surprised by the relative lack of fireworks being let off around here. Fireworks have been going off for a few days now and there were probably as many being let off on saturday night as there were last night. Growing up, few fireworks were let off prior to the actual night, in fact I can't recall letting off a firework of ours before 5th November, though we did save a couple of rockets for New Years Eve.

tex
06-11-2018, 13:09
Bonfire Night was last night and I was surprised by the relative lack of fireworks being let off around here. Fireworks have been going off for a few days now and there were probably as many being let off on saturday night as there were last night. Growing up, few fireworks were let off prior to the actual night, in fact I can't recall letting off a firework of ours before 5th November, though we did save a couple of rockets for New Years Eve.

Likewise, more fireworks on the 3rd and 4th than there were on the 5th..how strange.

staffslad
06-11-2018, 13:40
I put it down to an increasing number of people requiring instant gratification. They buy fireworks and can't wait even a few days to let them off. Same with buying other things. They can't wait and save for what they want, it has to be now that they have it. I think letting off fireworks is part of the same phenomenon, and I have noticed it over the last few Bonfire Nights, though last night was striking.

George 1978
06-11-2018, 13:50
Likewise, more fireworks on the 3rd and 4th than there were on the 5th..how strange.

I think that it is something to do with the fact that the 3rd and 4th fell on Saturday and Sunday this year, and so that was when a lot of official bonfire displays took place on - the Saturday closest to the 5th is usually the date chosen, especially for the annual event at the Forest Recreation Ground where it also has its sub-Goose Fair rides as well.

I heard the bangs and loud noises coming home from shopping yesterday, and I thought to myself that I bet that felt like Belfast during The Troubles!

And I was absolutely right - I am sure you heard about the fire at the Nottingham Cattle Market. I was correct in assuming that it was something to do with bonfire night and assumed that it wouldn't have happened at any other time of the year - it was caused by a lit firework - https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-46108866

staffslad
06-11-2018, 17:17
I agree that last night's lack of fireworks around here was probably exagerated by being so close to the weekend but I have noticed it in previous years as well around here. Don't think there are any organised events anywhere near us as far as I am aware. Also no bonfires--perhaps local laws have curtailed those now, but back in the day a bonfire was the norm. Even when my son was growing out of being bothered about fireworks, for the last couple of years we still had a fire in an old metal dustbin while letting off our fireworks.

staffslad
06-11-2018, 17:21
Forgot to say that Bonfire Night was not complete without traditional fare such as hot dogs, burgers, roasted chestnuts and baked potatos, plus pizza when that became popular.

Arran
06-11-2018, 17:50
They used to have bonfire night safety talks at school including one about things that you shouldn't put in a bonfire. I think I only just caught the end of the era when fun eclipsed health and safety on bonfire night - like attaching catherine wheels to the back door or making bonfires in builder's skips.

George 1978
06-11-2018, 18:37
It was great that Coronation Street episodes on ITV 3 have just shown the Bonfire Night episode from 1990 - quite appropriately timed for this time of year!

tex
07-11-2018, 15:00
Forgot to say that Bonfire Night was not complete without traditional fare such as hot dogs, burgers, roasted chestnuts and baked potatos, plus pizza when that became popular.

Also toffee apples and black eyed peas (for some reason)

Zincubus
07-11-2018, 16:44
Forgot to say that Bonfire Night was not complete without traditional fare such as hot dogs, burgers, roasted chestnuts and baked potatos, plus pizza when that became popular.
I love the wondrous fireworks but sadly ...

Now it's all about massive bangs and sonic booms and mortar bombs well past midnight .

Disgusting :(


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Arran
07-11-2018, 17:48
Bonfire night is not complete without mugs of soup but they have well and truly become a thing of the past.

How did treacle toffee become associated with bonfire night?

George 1978
07-11-2018, 18:44
It has to be Heinz tomato soup in that case - I always think of that flavour and brand during autumn months and events like Bonfire Night.

darren
07-11-2018, 18:48
Quite a few where live have either been reduced in size due to safety concerns or done away with entirely.

Fact we put tyres on ours is a bit of an issue.

Altho some where very high and close to houses.

People know the risks of going to them.