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Richard1978
16-12-2009, 19:27
Here's a list of stuff that I think of when remembering Christmas when I was young.

Being amazed by an impressive department store display of toys (normally a massive model railway layout), even though you know your parents would never buy it.

Having a doughnut shaped box of mint crisp chocolates for nibbles, with the contents arranged in a swirl like the orange & lemon crystalised slices also purchased some years.

Parents rationing out the chocs so that they last until mid January, with most of the ones on the tree being consumed after it's removed from the lounge.

Boasting at school about what presents I was expecting, & in the new year the ones we actually got.

Dads having to rush out late on Xmas eve to buy something overlooked or suddenly broken, also having to go out early on the 27th to get a replacement broken present, or materials to fix one.

An alternative school Xmas play as at my primary only the infants did the nativity & the juniors did stuff like The Tailor Of Gloucester.

Odd family things to on Xmas day that can get a funny look, like having coisants & Bucks Fizz for breakfast & playing Phil Spector's Xmas Album while opening presents.

Parents getting a bit drunk & saying daft things, a good laugh if it's a slip up when asking for a Buck's Fizz.

Getting a hamper of goodies from your Dad's company in place of an Xmas bonus.

Having all adults (apart from parents) asking what you're getting for Xmas from December 10th to Xmas Eve, & what you got from Xmas Day to January 10th.

TV Specials for Childrens TV shows made years before & repeated for many years afterwards. Record Breakers & Playschool guilty of this.

Getting a postal order from a distant great aunt you've only seen twice.

Being sent a card from a total stranger for a few Xmases in a row, as well as one from someone you met on holiday years before.

Having a different friend of your parents dropping in for a drink almost every night from 19/12 to new year's day.

Getting a large amount of sweets & eating a lot on Boxing day morning, & getting in trouble when you can't eat any breakfast.

The BBC1 Xmas logo being previewed on Blue Peter or Newsround.

Getting phonecalls from a relative in the middle of the special of your
Dad's favourite show, because the caller forgot it was longer than 30 minutes.

Going away for a few days to visit relatives between Xmas & new year, & only being aloud to take presents that are portable & less likely to be damaged in transit & by younger cousins.

The largest family present being labelled "To the Smith family, from Santa", always opened last.

Parents insisting that everyone plays a game regardless of physical & mental state, often leading to arugments about which set of rules (home or proper) to be used.

Getting adult cosmetics for the first time, & the slightest sniff since causing flashbacks.

Seeing a great one-off drama with an all star cast, that is almost never show again.

At least one compilation of a long finished comedy show with all the Xmassy sketches along with the all time favourties. A Carry On compilation fits into the catagory.

Knowing someone at school with a birthday in the Xmas period, who has a "present day" in the summer.

Shouting "can we get up now?" from 4:30 on Xmas morning to about 7:30.
Your Dad falling asleep on the train back from his xmas do & having to be picked up my your Mum or older sibling at somewhere in the middle of no-where.

Ticking all the stuff you want to watch over the xmas period in the listings mag. Also having an argument about what to video when there's a clash.

Having a games day on the last day of school, along with an hour of cartoons shown on TV in the hall & a "bring & share your own treats" party for lunchtime.

Noticing the TV ads on Boxing Day are for sales & holidays, as well as trailers for the New year season.

Your parents buying some cheap crackers that don't bang, having awful jokes & tacky toys. Often someone trys to pull the banging strip at an unexpected moment & almost gives someone a heat attack, & if you have a bald Dad he'll often fall asleep with a paper hat on that will soak up loads of sweat.

Having your first alcoholic drink & wondering what all the fuss is about.

Seeing an Xmas special that tries to drag out less plot line out than a normal episode to an extended length.

frame
16-12-2009, 19:58
That's a huge list,not sure if my memory is as productive as your's but my xmas was full of the smell's of the tree (real one) and a few particular tree decorations,(cheap white plastic lantern with some foil inside)good music playing in the house(spector) and most of all my dad was home for at least 10 days.(He was a long distance lorry driver)
Frame.

Richard1978
16-12-2009, 20:51
I cheated slightly by jotting down all the things that came to mind over a day or 2.

The Xmas tree smell is pleasent when fresh, but not too pleasent after a few days in the house with the central heating on. I came up with the term Treeo to discribe it one year after a pine got very pungent.

Megawitch
11-10-2010, 14:09
I remember always feeling tired at Christmas as a child. Early rises, late nights and so much excitement. And all the wonderful food, it never ended, my mum would fetch out a plate of goodies, nuts, crisps, cake, mince pies, sandwiches at the drop of a hat or a knock at the door as well as the huge dinners we had.

Just before Christmas Dad would swear a lot trying to untangle the Fairy Lights, I put them all back in boxes nowadays and they generally work perfectly when I get them out but weren't they expensive years ago and so cheap now?

RetroAEROSMITH
11-10-2010, 15:22
Christmas in the early 80s is probably unbeatable for any other decade for presents. Most kids had ONE main present that would be probably a bike or a computer and then about 10-15 others that were usually board games/dolls/footballs or rollerboots, and we were more than happy...we would go out in the streets on xmas day showing off our bikes and prams etc.

Christmas tv was the only time we could all sit and watch the blockbuster movies like Chitty chitty or Wizard of Oz... and the movies kept coming until around the 2nd of january which then told us xmas was over.

Aunties you saw once a year would bring you a present (usually a selection box) but still it was another thing to unwrap.

"C" size batteries were used in EVERYTHING and the blue ever ready ones were somehow different to the red ever ready ones even though i didnt know why.

Decoration wise there was health and safety rule breaking everywhere...cards on string hung over the fireplace,cellophane xmas tree decorations with letters spelling merry christmas on each tree pinned through the plaster on the wall regardless if there was any live wires behind it. - Christmas tree lights that were plugged directly into the light socket itself...no fangly functions like flashing or music...just static lights.

Neighbours from doors and doors away would "call in" after midnight to wish us all a happy new year...it saddens me to think now that (a) half are no longer with us and (b) the sentiment never transpired through the kids who witnessed it year after year.

There was no "toy of the year must have" in them days...nobody cared as the toys were usually well made and you would end up sharing and playing together.

These days and im saying from 1990s onwards unless that teddy bear walks talks reads stories while dancing holding a tv showing a dvd of said teddy in cartoon learning form...then kids today dont want to know. There must be a list of presents that every kid wants and expects and complains if there is anything missing from the list.
They say whose to blame? Its us...we are now the parents of these kids that demand such stuff and give the kids hope that there maybe a chance they will get that thing they wanted.

sandie76
01-12-2010, 00:32
A some ones I can think of are:

My sister and I sitting with the Kays catalogue, and later with the Argos book, writing our xmas lists.
Writing a letter to Santa, sometimes we posted them in the post box, and other times my Dad took them as he worked for Royal Mail.
Laying out our stocking at the end of the bed, waking up early in the morning, in the dark trying to feel for a filled stocking. Then I'd go to my sister's room so we could open our stockings together.Then we'd wake up Mum & Dad for permission to go downstairs to see what Santa had left us.
Eating Turkey sandwiches for Boxing day tea, as we'd usually have a Boxing day lunch similar to xmas day dinner.
Having to go to church after our xmas day full cooked breakfast, then getting to open the presents from Relatives that were still under the tree.
Ripping open our presents as fast as we could, usually starting with the sack, then going onto the pile sat on the couch.
When sales started at New Year. None of these Boxing day sales, unless you were after a new sofa or piece of furniture. Remember having to wait a whole week to spend any xmas money or vouchers I had to spend.
Writing out our thank you letters to relatives for presents they'd given us.
Getting excited when we got delivery of our hamper from 'Family Hampers', the boxes of chocolates would get hidden away, so my sister and I wouldn't scoff them.
Circling the programmes in the Radio & TV Times (yes we got them both, no idea why) that we didn't want to miss.
Having xmas Top of the Pops on and then my Mum wanting to watch the Queen's speech when it came on.

:D

Trickyvee
01-12-2010, 06:59
Creeping over to the living room door on Christmas morning. It had a typical 70's full glass panel made of 'stripey' glass that you couldn't see through. All you could see was a big blur of all the lights on the tree through it and I'd be sooooo excited in those seconds knowing all my pressies were there.

stockportyears
01-12-2010, 16:03
In the run up to Christmas, my primary school used to have a post box in the form of Santa's face, in which you used to post your Christmas cards to children in other classes through the mouth, then specially trained 'postboys and girls' from the fourth year juniors used to sort through them, and come round each classroom during registration and hand them out. It always made you feel important getting 'post' like adults did every morning. :D

Sometimes, even children sitting at the same table in the same class would use the post system to send cards, which was a bit silly but still fun anyways. And if a boy got a card from a girl in another class, he'd get teased all morning about his new 'girlfriend'. :D

Trickyvee
01-12-2010, 17:24
In the run up to Christmas, my primary school used to have a post box in the form of Santa's face, in which you used to post your Christmas cards to children in other classes through the mouth, then specially trained 'postboys and girls' from the fourth year juniors used to sort through them, and come round each classroom during registration and hand them out. It always made you feel important getting 'post' like adults did every morning. :D

Sometimes, even children sitting at the same table in the same class would use the post system to send cards, which was a bit silly but still fun anyways. And if a boy got a card from a girl in another class, he'd get teased all morning about his new 'girlfriend'. :D

We did this too and had a proper plastic pillar box set up in the foyer. It was always a competition to see who got the most cards each day.

I also remember individual decorations we had made being fixed on single strings to the ceiling of the corridor. There were loads of them and it looked really pretty. We used to try to jump up and touch them. When I went back to my primary school in the last year of high school they were still doing it and I was hitting my head on them!

darren
01-12-2010, 17:42
Christmas in the early 80s is probably unbeatable for any other decade for presents. Most kids had ONE main present that would be probably a bike or a computer and then about 10-15 others that were usually board games/dolls/footballs or rollerboots, and we were more than happy...we would go out in the streets on xmas day showing off our bikes and prams etc.

Christmas tv was the only time we could all sit and watch the blockbuster movies like Chitty chitty or Wizard of Oz... and the movies kept coming until around the 2nd of january which then told us xmas was over.

Aunties you saw once a year would bring you a present (usually a selection box) but still it was another thing to unwrap.

"C" size batteries were used in EVERYTHING and the blue ever ready ones were somehow different to the red ever ready ones even though i didnt know why.

Decoration wise there was health and safety rule breaking everywhere...cards on string hung over the fireplace,cellophane xmas tree decorations with letters spelling merry christmas on each tree pinned through the plaster on the wall regardless if there was any live wires behind it. - Christmas tree lights that were plugged directly into the light socket itself...no fangly functions like flashing or music...just static lights.

Neighbours from doors and doors away would "call in" after midnight to wish us all a happy new year...it saddens me to think now that (a) half are no longer with us and (b) the sentiment never transpired through the kids who witnessed it year after year.

There was no "toy of the year must have" in them days...nobody cared as the toys were usually well made and you would end up sharing and playing together.

These days and im saying from 1990s onwards unless that teddy bear walks talks reads stories while dancing holding a tv showing a dvd of said teddy in cartoon learning form...then kids today dont want to know. There must be a list of presents that every kid wants and expects and complains if there is anything missing from the list.
They say whose to blame? Its us...we are now the parents of these kids that demand such stuff and give the kids hope that there maybe a chance they will get that thing they wanted.


yes i had a few aunties back in the eighties who id see once a year.
normally i got a selection box or a few quid.
my mun took the money then gave it to me on christmas morning.

my uncle still sends me 1 hundred quid very christmas.
has done this for over 20 yrs.

yes normally one main present i got.
sometimes a toy like a scalextic set,or a star wars toy like the at at.

then id get other things like annuals,and sweets.

we where not allowed down till the parents got up.
sometimes it could be nine in te morning.

thing is with kids now there main present is more expensive that the ones we got.

and i feel that kids are less grateful than we where.
not in all cases though.

stuckinthe80's
01-12-2010, 18:04
I loved Christmas in the 80's! Got some great presents! My best one was in 1986 when I got my 'Ghetto Blaster'! I thought I was the dogs things!! I hate bragging but I thought it was better than anyone else's ;) My sisters boyfriend picked it out for my parents to buy and he was a breakdancer!! What more can I say! LOL :)

stockportyears
01-12-2010, 18:08
Circling the programmes in the Radio & TV Times (yes we got them both, no idea why) that we didn't want to miss.
:D

Because right up to about 1990, the Radio Times would only tell you about BBC programmes and the TV Times would only print ITV! Presumably each side wouldn't tell the other about its schedules.

The Christmas double issues were the only editions of the magazines we would ever get, as for the rest of the year, page 3 of the Manchester Evening News told us everything we wanted to know. Anyways, the double issues were always packed with adverts for summer holidays. On the back, Butlins would usually have a cartoon featuring 'Toot and Ploot', green aliens sent from another planet to find out what earthling holidays were like. Later on there were Toot and Ploot TV ads as well.

The Radio Times was black and white printed on cheap 'newspaper' type paper, and the ink would come off on your hands. The TV Times was of far better quality paper, with glossy colour photos of the tv stars, I disctinctly remember cutting out pics of Terry and Arfur from Minder and Hayley from Metal Mickey and sticking them up in my bedroom when I was about 10, lol.

stuckinthe80's
01-12-2010, 18:10
I used to deliver the Radio and TV times Christmas editions with a mate for extra money. We did it on a night. It was always really cold and just made you feel like Christmas was just round the corner! Fond memories.

stockportyears
01-12-2010, 18:12
I loved Christmas in the 80's! Got some great presents! My best one was in 1986 when I got my 'Ghetto Blaster'! I thought I was the dogs things!! I hate bragging but I thought it was better than anyone else's ;) My sisters boyfriend picked it out for my parents to buy and he was a breakdancer!! What more can I say! LOL :)

My Panasonic one was better, it had red and green lights along the front that lit up in time to the music. I mean, come on, you can't beat this example of 1983 high technology! :p

(Unless, of course, you had the same one!)

3009

stuckinthe80's
01-12-2010, 18:25
Thats a bobby dazzler!! Mine was a 'Sharp' one with a 'proper' graphic equaliser and 100w output! I loved it! It only stopped working about 5 years ago!

stockportyears
01-12-2010, 18:40
Thats a bobby dazzler!! Mine was a 'Sharp' one with a 'proper' graphic equaliser and 100w output! I loved it! It only stopped working about 5 years ago!

Mine lasted up to 1992, which is pretty good considering that I used it virtually every day, several hours a day, over the course of nine years.

stuckinthe80's
01-12-2010, 18:43
Things were made to last then!

Krazy
01-12-2010, 20:17
The last couple of weeks before Christmas, I never saw my father, as he worked overtime at the local sorting office. Only finally seeing him on Christmas Eve. You always knew it was Christmas Eve, as my mother would get out some crisp white tea towels, and arrange them neatly, spread across the top of the highly waxed walnut sideboard, where she would carefully put wine glasses and small short glasses on one side of the towel, all upside down, so no dust could get in. The other side would be Bristols Cream Sherry, Gordons Gin, Teachers Whisky, Vodka, and an assortment of Babychams, Ponys and Snowballs. and to complete would be a bottle of Advocat. The fruit bowl would be overflowing with Tangerines, Apples, Grapes and Bananas, some years we even had Pomegranites. Also on the coffee table, there would be a box of dates and a box of figs. We would go to bed relatively early, after leaving a freshly ironed crisp pillow case on the mantlepiece. (We never had stockings and we never left anything in our bedroom) Think this was because I was terrified of waking up and seeing a strange white bearded figure in my room.

stuckinthe80's
01-12-2010, 21:30
Me and my sister did the pillowcase thing! Never a stocking. Thought it was only us!

tulip
01-12-2010, 21:55
Hmm,let me think.

Making paper chains at school with the sticky paper.School christmas parties with kwenchy cups and ice cream and jelly.
Salmon sandwiches at lunchtime on Christmas day.Getting tights in with the pressies from grandparents.A chocolate smokers set and strange mexican drum thing from my dad's mum,my dad getting a sweetie pig from her.A white christmas tree,making a poster for the christmas and new year "shows" we did,then doing the shows.Sitting on the extra green folding chairs my gran and grandpa had to bring.The extra present left out the back from "the fairies".My dad's mum eating to quickly and almost throwing up at the table.Doing the rounds of the relatives on New years eve,my dad's mum having a faint smell of whisky on her and her weird way of smoking"just for the novelty!"Going to gran and grandpas and getting ginger wine,despite my gran knowing I didn't like it.Going there on New Years day and getting extra pressies,their wee tree,making snowmen out of toilet roll tubes,cotton wool and meat trays,with my nice gran.Auntie Peggy's snorty laughing at Morecombe and Wise,grandpa doing his "wee man"silverside for dinner then clootie dumpling with money in it!!!Playing at shops later on in gran and grandpa's big hall cupboard and all the adults coming to buy stuff!!!!!

God!that brought it all back,brought a wee tear to my eye.There is probably more too.

tulip

Mr.Rainbow
01-12-2010, 23:14
When I was younger, we alway's went to Lewis's Kids HQ in Manchester and Leeds to see Father Christmas. It wasn't Christmas without going to Lewis's and then having lunch in Kendals on Deansgate. I remember they had a construction fence up (the store was also going to be home to M&S after the 1996 Manchester Bomb) and I somehow managed to get lost in an area I wasn't supposed to. My parents had to make a tannoy I think.

It's a shame it is'nt with us - although Ive heard something about a Lewis's grotto in Liverpool moving to Rapid? We visited Liverpool the other day and Im sure people had Lewis's Kids HQ bags

I thought Lewis's was long gone - obviously not.

Krazy
02-12-2010, 01:16
Yes Lewis`s Grotto has moved into Rapid Hardware. Back in the Early Summer, before Lewis`s closed. They opened the grotto up for one last time. Kiddies could all get a small gift and the grotto was donned in Christmas lights and tinsel. And animated Fairytale characters.

stuckinthe80's
02-12-2010, 08:18
We always had a trip into Newcastle to look at Fenwicks window. Always magical!

Krazy
02-12-2010, 08:48
Real candles on the Christmas Tree, held on by little holders. (Alot of Health and Safety issues there I think)
Home made Christmas Crackers
Home baked Mince Pies, Christmas Cake and Trifle, which where delicious by todays standards.
Selection Boxes which at the time seemed as big as myself, they where gigantic.
Chocolate Snowmen and chocolate coins in a little bag on the tree.
A Nativity Scene, made out of cardboard.

Paulos
02-12-2010, 11:39
Mine lasted up to 1992, which is pretty good considering that I used it virtually every day, several hours a day, over the course of nine years.

My Panasonic ghetto has just given up the ghost due the mechanical tape drive I've written about it on other posts as someone put a picture of an old Argos catalogue on which it was in!

Also the circling the xmas radio times time must have been a real part of kids Xmas back then I remember me and my sister writing out our Xmas TV schedules and having to get them to fit in with each other.

Another thing that doesn't happen any more is dads testing the Xmas tree bulbs (huge great bulbs not like the tiny things today that we just throw away and replace) he'd have to have a electrical engineering degree to find the fault in the string of bulbs and then also have a box of spare bulbs to replace the one fault that was keeping the whole string from working.

branny
03-12-2010, 01:26
I remember christmas eve being the longest night ever.

darren
03-12-2010, 02:12
I remember christmas eve being the longest night ever.

thartts so true.
id go to be around 8.

id not be able to sleep thinking of what id got.;)

Richard1978
03-12-2010, 13:42
Me & my brother would keep saying "Can we get up yet?" until about 7:30.

vanhelsing
05-12-2010, 00:17
Chirstmas telly used to be ACE but I don't know what the schedule planners got up to because now it's C**p.

stuckinthe80's
05-12-2010, 10:21
I remember christmas eve being the longest night ever.
I used to love christmas eve! I agree it did seem to last forever. In a good way though! I used to go out on the morning with my Mum to get the last minute bits and pieces then out with my mates all afternoon till about 7pm when I had to come home to go and visit my Grandparents. Then it was supper time and off to bed for a night of very little sleep due to all the excitement! I have very fond memories of christmas eves. Its not the same now that i'm 37!!

Marine Boy
05-12-2010, 16:29
Can't believe I've not contributed to this thread before.

I identify with so many of the memories here. That huge tin of Quality Street by the sofa. The bowl of nuts on the table. The smell of pine. We also had a box of decorations that was brought down from the loft - with the little robin that was supposed to clip onto the tree but was broken so was sellotaped. Every year! lol

Trickyvee
05-12-2010, 18:45
We always had a trip into Newcastle to look at Fenwicks window. Always magical!

:D Loved it!

Also only ever got dates, bowls of mixed nuts, after eights, parsnips and those sausages wrapped in bacon at Christmas.

I was always unhungry and half asleep at Christmas dinner having eaten my body weight in chocolate for breakfast and having spent the previous three days hardly sleeping and bouncing around with excitement.

Marine Boy
05-12-2010, 18:56
...I was always unhungry and half asleep at Christmas dinner having eaten my body weight in chocolate for breakfast...

lol lol :) !

Jingbang
05-12-2010, 19:35
Being that eager to open your presents you couldnt remember exactly who bought you what, also being told by your parents not to leave the wrapping paper too close to the fire.

Shouting abuse at the Queen because you didnt want to listen to her boring claptrap for 10 minutes and couldnt wait for the big film premier to start at 3.10 then falling asleep halfway through it.
The 3.10 films these days are rubbish and always computer animated things like Shrek, Shark Tale etc.

Checking on a daily basis at the Papershop for the Xmas Radio/TV Times to arrive was nearly always out on the 11th these days its usally a few days earlyier than that.

Mr.Rainbow
06-12-2010, 18:51
I identify with so many of the memories here. That huge tin of Quality Street by the sofa.

It's only Christmas to me, when I see one of them shiny wrappers ;)

Trickyvee
06-12-2010, 19:27
The excitement of the advent calendar (no chocolate, only pictures). I bet there isn't anyone who didn't sneakily open a few doors before the day, carefully closing them after a quick peek.

One time I had the same calendar as a friend. Every single day we'd ask each other what we got and would laugh when we said the same thing. This went on for three weeks!

Morton
09-09-2011, 22:00
Always looking forward to After Eights, Jelly Oranges, and Walnuts even though most of us loathed the taste of them, it's because Christmas wouldn't be the same without them. I mostly experienced the scent of a plastic tree each year, the musty smell of it having been in storage for 11 months every year never got old. All the ornaments had a magical old plastic smell. We always had advent calenders, that most of the time I would finish in a few days because of temptation. (often got told off)

As a kid Christmas Eve was the most exciting day (in the moment) because of the extreme excitement you got. The waiting was so difficult. On Christmas Day we didn't put presents around the tree. We had big toy sacks, or stockings hanging up. The musty smell of the tough wool/cotton was great. As for movies, every year we watched The Nightmare Before Christmas, and The Snowman. Almost as though it was a strict tradition. That was christmas for me in the nineties. :D

This year, I hope to recreate a similar christmas I enjoyed as a kid.

willpurry
09-09-2011, 22:13
Kathleen next door always gave my brother and I a Chocolate Orange.

Trickyvee
09-09-2011, 22:47
Getting sent out after dark to post cards to the neighbours. For some reason you couldn't be seen doing the posting or else they'd guess who it was from! It always seemed to be cold and frosty when I did it but that's probably the artistic licence of my memory at work.

stuckinthe80's
10-09-2011, 07:14
Delivering the Radio Times and TV Times christmas editions with a mate on a night after school in the mid 1980's. Always very cold and the bags were always very heavy!

darren
11-09-2011, 00:55
Always looking forward to After Eights, Jelly Oranges, and Walnuts even though most of us loathed the taste of them, it's because Christmas wouldn't be the same without them. I mostly experienced the scent of a plastic tree each year, the musty smell of it having been in storage for 11 months every year never got old. All the ornaments had a magical old plastic smell. We always had advent calenders, that most of the time I would finish in a few days because of temptation. (often got told off)

As a kid Christmas Eve was the most exciting day (in the moment) because of the extreme excitement you got. The waiting was so difficult. On Christmas Day we didn't put presents around the tree. We had big toy sacks, or stockings hanging up. The musty smell of the tough wool/cotton was great. As for movies, every year we watched The Nightmare Before Christmas, and The Snowman. Almost as though it was a strict tradition. That was christmas for me in the nineties. :D

This year, I hope to recreate a similar christmas I enjoyed as a kid.

yes i loved christmas eve when i was a kid.
there was no chance i could ever sleep.
and we could not go fown befire eight in the morning.
i tried to go down before that but i was caught and up i was sent.

oh yes i just aDored those jelly oranges which i got loads of in christmas day and terrys chocolate orange not the bar the big round one with segents.

can u explain how u mean to recreate a christmas u had as a kid.

kazboot
11-09-2011, 17:30
For as long as I can remember my granny always used to give us Meltis New Berry Fruits every Christmas.

RetroAEROSMITH
14-09-2011, 13:00
I personally think that since shops opened 24 hours right through christmas and new year a lot of the christmas feel has been lost. Families having to work right up to the day or through the day, sales being arranged for boxing day so early starts there too.
I remember if you ran out of batteries you had to wait a few days before being able to buy more which then got you to use your board game presents or books/annuals.

We had hours of fun on Guess Who, Mr Pop,Frustration and Perfection...i see kids today not even bothering with board games unless theyre about High school musical or Bieber.

Christmas kids tv was always special and some of the dramas shown through that period usually stay with you the longest....i remember the hype surrounding The box of delights and its effects, it was shown every week towards christmas and the last episode shown on christmas eve...how can you get more christmassy than that?

I never went to midnight mass but my gran used to, she said it was magical and i believed her...although you get the people who say how can it be midnight mass on the 24th dec when Jesus wasnt even born in december etc etc...gets my goat...

Christmas was the only time we got to see large chocolate bars and big tinned sweets...even roses were a luxury..these days theyre sneered at and big bars are 10 a penny.

I also remember we wrapped wrapping paper arounf the bucket the xmas tree was in and it was usually wedged up with house bricks....did anyone else do this?

You always remember the time you were told about father christmas not being real or the time when you went to buy or choose your presents yourself....my mum would be like what tape/game do you want rather than just getting ones she thought youd like.

Slippers and pyjamas were always unwrapped first, worn on xmas night too after a bath with that soap shaped like popeye or mr matey.

Annuals such as beano,dandy etc were looked forward too and re read numerous times...even the girls ones my sisters had had good spooky stories in.

Waiting for the christmas number one...no year so hotly anticipated than that of band aid and last christmas by wham.

Morton
15-09-2011, 05:14
yes i loved christmas eve when i was a kid.
there was no chance i could ever sleep.
and we could not go fown befire eight in the morning.
i tried to go down before that but i was caught and up i was sent.

oh yes i just aDored those jelly oranges which i got loads of in christmas day and terrys chocolate orange not the bar the big round one with segents.

can u explain how u mean to recreate a christmas u had as a kid.

Meaning I haven't had a christmas like I previously mentioned since I was a kid, so this year I want to get out all our very old decorations, and celebrate the day in a manner as we would have done in the past. I'll make a list of what things used to make christmas.

We've hardly celebrated christmas at all in the last 5 years, so it will be nice to really focus on christmas this year, I can't wait :D

Trickyvee
15-09-2011, 17:25
I agree about the big bars of chocolate and big tins of sweets. I can't remember having them at any other time of year so they were special and exciting for that reason.

I also remember watching The box of Delights and there was huge hype about the special effects. I remember them explaining all about the blue background thing to make people big and small and disappear through windows etc although I'm sure it couldn't have been that revolutionary at the time. Wasn't it used before this?

Richard1978
15-09-2011, 17:50
My Dad remembers having big tins of sweets all year round as far back as the 1950's. My Grandad had a bit sweet tooth, especially after giving up smoking in the mid 1950's. (he even gave for a time in the war to get a larger Army sweet ration).

Dr Who was using blue screen effects (Colour Seperation Overlay (CSO) in BBC jargon) as far back as 1970.

By the mid 1980's it became far smoother, probably using more computerisation.

darren
15-09-2011, 23:50
I agree about the big bars of chocolate and big tins of sweets. I can't remember having them at any other time of year so they were special and exciting for that reason.

I also remember watching The box of Delights and there was huge hype about the special effects. I remember them explaining all about the blue background thing to make people big and small and disappear through windows etc although I'm sure it couldn't have been that revolutionary at the time. Wasn't it used before this?

here is the box of delights mate.
http://youtu.be/-BxxdE9GvZc
thanks for reminding me of this.
very creepy indeed.

vanhelsing
25-09-2011, 21:58
Anybody from the Old Trafford/Stretford areas of Manchester remember the kids' Christmas parties they used to hold every christmas at The Dog And Partdridge* (You could see Manchester United's football stadium in the near distance)?

*It got burnt down.

vanhelsing
25-09-2011, 22:01
I remember the manchester Lewis's. Applied for a job working the lifts there (believe me, it's a lot better and saner than working on a supermarket shopfloor and your not treated like some customer's only personal shopper, servant/packer) during the late '90s and I was STILL Waiting before the announcement that Primark were taking over,

vanhelsing
25-09-2011, 22:26
I personally think that since shops opened 24 hours right through christmas and new year a lot of the christmas feel has been lost. Families having to work right up to the day or through the day, sales being arranged for boxing day so early starts there too.



Good point, RetroAEROSMITH. What these big supermarket chains and other shops forget is that Christmas is a time for families, not some executive's bonus and company profits and it wouldn't surprise me if the big supermarket chains had their way and opened on Christmas day (with certain or the most vulnerable staff being bullied, bribed or blackmailed into working Christmas day 'just for a few hours {NO CHANCE WITH ME UNLESS I WAS GAURANTEED A FOUR FIGURE BONUS GIVEN TO ME IN MY HAND UPON ARRIVAL}.) If it was up to me the super markets and deparmtent stores would have compulsory closing from 2:00 p.m Christmas eve until 4th January. Pub openings'd be optional (with bonuses gauranteed for staff to come in) and bonuses and volunteer staff for the emergecy services. So, please customers, when you're queing up early in the morning for the shops to open on Boxing/New year's day, please spare a thought and show some consideration for the retail workers and make things pleasent for them, tip them and not patronise them or treat them like your own personal servant.

HG
26-09-2011, 20:10
Can we keep on topic please? That is Christmas When You Were Growing Up? If you want to debate the joys of working in shops please start a thread in the members lounge, thank you gents :)

Trickyvee
27-09-2011, 07:15
Did anybody have a routine in Christmas Eve? I didn't really except that I was always taken for a walk around the estate just as it was getting dark to see people's trees and lights. It was probably to tire me out but it never worked! I enjoyed it though.

I missed out on the great 'new pyjamas' tradition. Scabby old ones for me, even on Christmas Eve!

HG
27-09-2011, 07:45
Removed a lot of off topic stuff please keep to discussing Christmas not working in shops, if not the thread will be closed.

Richard1978
27-09-2011, 13:05
I remember by Dad used to get some gift vouchers as part of his Xmas bonus, which my parents used to get us presents with. They would even label them from the company for some reason.

At least one year we got a basket of goodies from my Dad's company.

Trickyvee
27-09-2011, 20:17
I remember my dad coming home with a bonus box of goodies from work one year. It was pretty decent stuff - I distinctly remember a jar of what I now know to be very nice whole grain French mustard, but in those days that sort of thing was a bit too high brow for the likes of us and we didn't know what to do with half the stuff.

I've never had a Christmas bonus, monetary or otherwise, in any of the jobs I've had. Are they a thing of the past?

HG
27-09-2011, 20:28
I've never had a Christmas bonus, monetary or otherwise, in any of the jobs I've had. Are they a thing of the past?

The only christmas bonus I've had was from the papershop owner when I used to deliver newspapers, I used to always get christmas boxes from some houses I delivered to which was nice.

Having worked in the public sector since leaving school there's never been a chance to get a bonus of any kind.

Richard1978
27-09-2011, 20:52
I normally get some Sodexho vouchers (usable at a number of high street shops) & a bottle of wine or bucks fizz.

Mulletino
14-07-2014, 03:32
Christmas us kids would pick a corner of the lounge where we'd stack our opened presents, my fave was the year I got the Palitoy Cardboard Death Star, it was huge!

This is a pic from an early 70s xmas where myself and my Bro got some pretty cool Lone Ranger toys!

http://www.mattys.net/OAPS/Lone%20RangerSmall.jpg

80sChav
21-07-2014, 21:34
The only way I can dsescribe this topic/thread is "Brilliaint Memories"!

In the day's whe your young everything seems different - Xmas in particular. A few memories from the 19080s/1990s I'll always recall are the day's being short in terms of daylihjt morning and afternoon and of course the anxious wait (as a kiid) to open presents coupled with watching great cartoons from "back in the day" as well too as recalling having big family Xmas dinners/and do's etc from "back in the day" Excellent times indeed!

Richard1978
21-07-2014, 22:17
It's a bit like that for me, & used to get really worked up from the time school closed to Xmas day!

There used to be loads of cartoons ones, as well as the big names there seemed to be lots of obscure ones, either Xmas themed from small studios or ones from the big studios without any famous characters, normally in off-peak slots when something good was on.

It used to be really rare for my Mum to roast Turkey any other time of the year, so it was a real treat.

akb48fan
24-08-2014, 20:43
Christmas growing up in the late 70's/early 80's was pure pleasure for myself. I was fortunate that my parents bought me a load of Star Wars figures/ships over several Christmases and I always love remembering back to those days. I used to wake up really early at 4am just to see what I had got from Santa, back to bed for a couple of hours before playing with whatever gifts I'd received later on. From mid morning the waft of turkey being cooked made you hungry. I enjoyed watching Digby The Biggest Dog In The World and the Christmas TV specials on the box such as Morecable & Wise and Mike Yarwood. If only I could go back and relieve those days once more.

catflap
24-08-2014, 21:32
Nice memories akb48fan - this is my era too and I remember watching Digby a time or two. That's something I really miss - the specials at Christmas. I don't think we'll ever see those times again alas.

scotchmist
19-12-2014, 23:20
Always looked forward to visiting my cousins at Christmas as my younger cousin Roderick was the baby of the family, ill most of the time, and therefore spoilt rotten, he always had the most amazing toys and games. One Christmas he actually got Cross-fire.....that was a pretty big deal back then as cost a bit, ....anyway the spoilt bitch wouldn't let my sister and myself near it, the angels however smiled down on us as he was smitten down with a massive asthma attack and had to sit out in the garden in the freezing Glasweigan air, my sister and myself seized the opportunity with glee and were really getting into a festive game of jolly old Cross-Fire when his cross mother appeared in his bedroom doorway and ordered us downstairs to console our wilting wee cousin, we couldn't understand why she was so angry!

amethyst
20-12-2014, 08:16
Christmas eve waiting for the log/coal fire to burn out.because santa would get burnt coming down the chimney:rolleyes:going to bed with a ex large pillow case at the bottom of the bed.Waking up on xmas morning and saying he,s been the pillow case full of presents

80schild
16-09-2015, 01:26
Christmas in the mid 80s for me would properly begin when the school term ended around the 20th/21st of December, although I always secretly started the countdown from the Autumn term in September. I always loved receiving my Advent Calendar, the type, I always several times over requested was the traditional, but with the sliders / 3D layered effect sort, the countdown seem so slow, until you reached the 20s' (coinciding perhaps with the end of term) then the final days would be a blur. Christmas Eve morning would usually be a trip in to town with mum to pick up the last few dinner pieces, followed by a breakfast at Debenhams then a lift home from an impatient dad.

The rest of the afternoon would be spent watching TV, the Blue Peter Christmas Eve programme always being the best of the year, then in 1984, The Box of Delights. I always had a captivation of when BBC1 would change their usual idents to the Christmas ones which usually occurred in the 80s around late afternoon, a moment I looked forward to as it mean it was now Christmas 'proper'. This usually led to a bath, new bed linen and a scrub-up before driving to my grandparents for a Christmas Eve gathering with a buffet.

The family reunion usually ended around half past midnight by which time I would be bursting for it to be Christmas Day, we would drive home in foggy weather, watch a bit of TV then go to bed. Christmas Day usually started with a stocking at the bottom of the bed with a few good puzzle stocking fillers, Quality Street, and in later years the latest NOW compilation cassette which went immediately on repeat, and by 6am my sister and I would be waking the house up. We probably had to wait a good hour for tea to be made and then finally were allowed downstairs (which mum had already been down to, to start the turkey cooking since around 5am) and then the lounge door was opened.

xmark1234
16-09-2015, 06:46
yes defo I use to love it xmas eve would take for ever to end wanted go bed at 7pm lol I was always up early mum and dad use to hear me get up and say hes not been yet go back to bed lol


Christmas eve waiting for the log/coal fire to burn out.because santa would get burnt coming down the chimney:rolleyes:going to bed with a ex large pillow case at the bottom of the bed.Waking up on xmas morning and saying he,s been the pillow case full of presents

amethyst
16-09-2015, 08:04
yes defo I use to love it xmas eve would take for ever to end wanted go bed at 7pm lol I was always up early mum and dad use to hear me get up and say hes not been yet go back to bed lol

Exactly especially when you wake up at around 5am,my dad would shout santa is watching go back to bed now

darren
16-09-2015, 21:48
TO THE BED AT 7 UR PARENTS WHERE SUPER STRICT.:eek:

WHAT AGE WHERE U THEN.

MOST CHRISTMAS EVE'S FOR ME THE EXCITEMENT WAS UNBEARABLE THE DAY JUST DRAGGED AND I WAS NOT TO GET UP THE NXT DAY BEFORE THE PARENTS GOT UP.

MOST TIMES THEY DIDNT GET UP UNTIL 8AM.

ID KNOCK THE BEDROOM DOOR CAN I GO DOWN YET NO NOT YET TILL WE GET UP.:D






yes defo I use to love it xmas eve would take for ever to end wanted go bed at 7pm lol I was always up early mum and dad use to hear me get up and say hes not been yet go back to bed lol

xmark1234
17-09-2015, 06:52
I was very young 5 or 6 maybe long time ago but can still see we lived in a terraced house with open stair case remember lieing on top of the top step just to see if he had been lol

TO THE BED AT 7 UR PARENTS WHERE SUPER STRICT.:eek:

WHAT AGE WHERE U THEN.

MOST CHRISTMAS EVE'S FOR ME THE EXCITEMENT WAS UNBEARABLE THE DAY JUST DRAGGED AND I WAS NOT TO GET UP THE NXT DAY BEFORE THE PARENTS GOT UP.

MOST TIMES THEY DIDNT GET UP UNTIL 8AM.

ID KNOCK THE BEDROOM DOOR CAN I GO DOWN YET NO NOT YET TILL WE GET UP.:D

darren
16-08-2016, 16:29
i remember writing out a list of what i anted or did i imagine that list bit minds gone foggy over the last 3 decades:d.

But i do remember leaving biccies and milk for santa on the kitchen table.
Seems he liked it cause when i got up it was gone.

wispa lover
16-08-2016, 19:03
Our 'stockings' were huge Toys R Us bags.
Unwrapped presents and wrapping paper all over the floor and our parents got out the bin bags to throw out the wrapping paper.
Fruit bowls were filled with numerous chocolate bars and I would be staring at them, badly wanting one.
One year we put little chocolates on the tree and when I was alone I would pinch a few. Oops.

akb48fan
16-09-2016, 07:15
One memory that sticks out the most was the year that my parents broke the illusion of Santa delivering presents on Christmas Eve. Must have been 7 or 8 at the time. I woke up to go the toilet after midnight and when I went back to bed I heard a bang coming down the hall. It turned out to be my parents trying to sneak my brand new bike into the house. The back wheel must have hit the door going into the lounge. I didn't show myself to my parents at all, I just went quietly back to bed but the damage had been done. I knew then that Santa wasn't real!!

darren
16-09-2016, 13:14
and when did u tell your parents that from that night on you knew santa was not real or did you tell them.


one memory that sticks out the most was the year that my parents broke the illusion of santa delivering presents on christmas eve. Must have been 7 or 8 at the time. I woke up to go the toilet after midnight and when i went back to bed i heard a bang coming down the hall. It turned out to be my parents trying to sneak my brand new bike into the house. The back wheel must have hit the door going into the lounge. I didn't show myself to my parents at all, i just went quietly back to bed but the damage had been done. I knew then that santa wasn't real!!

akb48fan
16-09-2016, 14:17
and when did u tell your parents that from that night on you knew santa was not real or did you tell them.

I did tell them a couple of years later that they'd been rumbled that night!!!

darren
16-09-2016, 14:20
How did they feel about it.

You did well to hide your disappointment that same chrimbo.


i did tell them a couple of years later that they'd been rumbled that night!!!

akb48fan
16-09-2016, 14:35
I remember my mother gave my father a glare at the time so it must have been him that banged the bike that night!!! We all laughed about it many years later.

darren
17-09-2016, 14:34
bad daddy.:d

i think as time went on i just worked out it wasnt santa.

I used to leave milk and biccies for him on the kitchen table.:d



i remember my mother gave my father a glare at the time so it must have been him that banged the bike that night!!! We all laughed about it many years later.

Twocky61
17-09-2016, 16:38
When I was a naughty boy serving time in borstal I hung my sock on the handle of my cell door. Christmas morning when staff opened my door the sock was still there. It was empty except for a note which had written on it:


"No presents for you this year as you have not been a good boy. From Santa" lol

Arran
17-09-2016, 18:40
I have never believed in Santa. My parents think that it's all a silly hoax.

battyrat
18-09-2016, 08:17
Thinking about Christmas brings back so many memories of a time that seems so long ago now. It reminds me mostly of that care free time when everything was so easy and the world seemed so innocent especially as a child.

We used to make a lot of our own things. Paper decorations seemed to be in everybody's house and we would spend the week before Christmas putting them together. Glass baubles that always seemed to break easily.I think many of our decorations lasted for many years. I don't remember much foil decorations as a kid in the early 70's but they seemed to come in more later on. I particularly remember a big card and cotton wool snowman that once contained goodies and a Santa doll.

Christmas puddings and cakes were always made at home. Mum would start them months earlier so that they would be ready for the big day.I can still smell them being made with all the spices and alcohol. Nearer the time we would all decorate them. The puddings and cakes was always a family thing as we all had to stir the mix for luck.

The mystery and suspense of Christmas was as good as Christmas day itself. Mum would go to church but I never wanted to so I stayed with dad or went around to my friends. Then there was getting together with my mates after Christmas to compare presents.

Christmas was the only time as a kid I got to enjoy the adult stuff like a sip of Babysham or real beer shandy.

Apart from making of the cake and pudding and stocking up on goodies Christmas seemed to start a lot later as well.

We always stocked up with goodies as the shops shut down over Christmas almost for the entire holiday. If you did not have it then you had to go without. You could not just pop out on Boxing day to grab a pint of milk, as the shops were all shut.

The excitement of the primary school party and making of Christmas cards and hats, and the decorations for class. The school play and the float that used to be a cart pulled by a tractor. We also used to have a Santa come around the estate a few days before Christmas on a float throwing sweets to us kids.

I loved Christmas a child. Just wish I could find a bit of that magic again. But as an adult it all seems to have vanished with age for some reason.

staffslad
18-09-2016, 12:08
When I was very young my parents would have my pillow case of Christmas presents in their room and on the big morning I would get in bed between them and open all my presents. Later, the pillow case would be in the lounge and I would open them there. Remember being told to make a mental note of who had bought which present so they could be thanked.

Mom always made the Christmas cake and pudding and fruit would be soaking in alcohol for days. There was always a sixpence in the pudding and you had to be careful when eating it. Christmas was the only time we had turkey. We got it from a farm and every Christmas Eve morning my dad and I would go and collect it. My gran made the mince pies. She made hundreds every Christmas, as neighbours would bring her the ingredients and ask her to make them some.

I can't recall ever being asked what I wanted for Christmas, so it was always a surprise to find out what I was getting. When very young, I would write a letter to Santa and send it up the chimney, as back then we had coal fires.

I recall on Christmas morning getting out of bed and opening the curtains to see if we had snow. I would have to scrape the ice off the inside of the window before I could peer out--no central heating for us back then.

Unless the weather was awful there would be kids running around the neighbourhood, showing off their new bikes, doll's prams, footballs etc. Now on Christmas morning there is nary a child in sight--all busy on their new IPhones or games consoles I suppose.

When did Christmas start for me? Well, I used to keep a lookout for the first sighting of a Christmas TV advert--usually Woolworth's--and then I knew it was approaching. I don't think I had a bought Advent calendar, but I seem to remember possibly making them at school towards the end of November. Of course, making it yourself there was no sense of surprise as to what was hiding behind each door.

Always there would be dates, figs, nuts, boxes of chocolates and savoury snacks. I don't think we had dates, figs or nuts except at Christmas.

I used to leave a mince pie and glass of milk for Santa, and a carrot and dish of water for his reindeer, on the sideboard in the lounge.

I was excited at what was on TV over Christmas and anxiously anticipated the double issues of Radio Times and TV Times--the only time mom bought both. Then I would look first at the films section to see what was on, before making a diary of what to watch--no video recorders then, so only one chance to see it.

My gran and grandad lived very close so I would run down the road and wish them a Merry Christmas. After my grandad died my gran always came to our house for Christmas Day and to my uncle's for Boxing Day. Before my grandad died we all went to see them as he was crippled with arthritis and was bedridden, so my mom would take tea for them.

My dad would often work Christmas Eve morning. My mom rarely would go out on that day but I would walk to the local shops and get any last minute items she needed.

One Christmas Eve afternoon when I was older, I was doing my paper round delivering the local evening paper. I bumped into one of my customers and he said he wanted to pay his bil. It was about 70p for his weeks' papers and he gave me £2 and said to keep the change. I was amazed. A £1.30 tip was a lot of money back then. Actually, I think he had been partaking at the local Working Men's Club, but I was over the moon.

Arran
18-09-2016, 12:25
Unless the weather was awful there would be kids running around the neighbourhood, showing off their new bikes, doll's prams, footballs etc. Now on Christmas morning there is nary a child in sight--all busy on their new IPhones or games consoles I suppose.

Very true. Kids had game consoles and computers for Christmas in the 1990s but I can definitely remember seeing more kids out and about on Christmas and Boxing Day back then. The streets are nearly deserted nowadays.

I think more people went to church on Christmas back in the 1990s.

staffslad
18-09-2016, 13:01
We--my mom and I--used to attend the Christmas Eve nativity service, which was about 6.30pm or 7pm. Occasionally we would go to the midnight service when I was older. I have also remembered that part of Christmas was the school carol service held at the local church a few days prior to breaking up for Christmas.

Twocky61
16-09-2017, 14:36
In our Nativity play I was the Inn keeper. I told Jesus & Mary "Sorry we're full. It's always busy at Christmas" lol

staffslad
16-09-2017, 18:59
Snap! I was innkeeper in our nativity play. I just said "Sorry, there is no room in the inn." I had a pretend lantern I had to hold up. I was told to lift it up with my right hand, but I forgot and used my left as I am left handed, so as a result the audience couldn't see my face.

Twocky61
17-09-2017, 08:32
lol

darren
17-09-2017, 21:44
The nativity makes me think of frank spencer ans his nativity play in one of his episodes.

What a great story and well remembered what age where you then.

They must have wondered why they could not see your face.



snap! I was innkeeper in our nativity play. I just said "sorry, there is no room in the inn." i had a pretend lantern i had to hold up. I was told to lift it up with my right hand, but i forgot and used my left as i am left handed, so as a result the audience couldn't see my face.

staffslad
19-09-2017, 09:50
I would have been at infants school, so somewhere between 5 and 7. I remember that was my big scene--my only scene, actually--and I never got to be in the Nativity play again.

The Frank Spencer episode is the one where he plays the angel and ends up on the roof.
The nativity makes me think of frank spencer ans his nativity play in one of his episodes.

What a great story and well remembered what age where you then.

They must have wondered why they could not see your face.

staffslad
19-09-2017, 09:59
After Christmas, my mum would take me to the largest town closest to us so I could spend the money I had received for Christmas from various relatives. That was such an exciting day as I only got to go there 2 or 3 times per year, and having money to spend made it so much better.

Twocky61
19-09-2017, 10:29
Same here staffslad :) Some to spend and some to put in my Birmingham & Midshires building society account. Sadly no more as B&Mids BS no longer exists. I believe it was bought out by one of the major players; Halifax or Leeds BS maybe

zabadak
19-09-2017, 13:52
I would have been at infants school, so somewhere between 5 and 7. I remember that was my big scene--my only scene, actually--and I never got to be in the Nativity play again.

The Frank Spencer episode is the one where he plays the angel and ends up on the roof.

Apparently Michelle "Betty" Dotrice was laughing so much she wet herself... :eek:

Richard1978
19-09-2017, 17:45
Apparently Michelle "Betty" Dotrice was laughing so much she wet herself... :eek:

I know she, Michael Crawford & Richard Wilson had to hold back he laughter when the sofa started to collapse underneath them.

George 1978
15-12-2017, 06:40
As we are in December again, I think I will add my own memories of Christmas:

Advent calendars on the wall - the ones that had chocolate in of course. Christmas parties at school (please see the other thread for more details on that).

The same old Christmas tree, decorations and baubles still used in the 1980s as they were in the 1970s. And the cotton wool on a toilet roll tube to make a snowman.

Once broken up from school, I remember visiting the man in the red cloak and white beard at the top floor of the Co-op department store. This would have been around 1985 - the last year that I probably officially believed him. I remember waiting in the queue, and there was a young girl there before me in the queue, and I remember Father Christmas asking her what she wanted for Christmas, and she said that she wanted a Game of Life (MB Games) and a beanbag. Funny how one remembers these little things after so many years! I might have also seen a children's film at the Odeon or ABC afterwards as well.

In 1985 I remember getting a Mars selection box - possibly the one that I got from the grotto that year. We put the chocolate bars in the fridge, and I remember biting into a Mars bar, and it was so hard that it was like biting into concrete! Mother had to make a post-Christmas, but pre-New Year appointment with the dentist (which I had found out about when obtaining my medical notes under the Data Protection Act 1998 a few years ago), and I remember having to bite on a gauze because of the bleeding!

Christmas Eve, and we used to leave a mince pie and a glass of something so that it would be eaten while we were asleep. I don't know about Father Christmas, but I was right with the "Father" bit anyway as he used to eat them. Also, I remember leaving a note for Father Christmas one year, and I found out that he had exactly the same handwriting as my mother - I hope that he hadn't been done for forgery! I actually thought that Father Christmas couldn't come to my part of Nottingham as he was too busy going down the chimneys somewhere in Dorset instead!

Christmas morning - out of bed, half a dozen boxes wrapped up in seasonal paper at the foot of the bed. Switch the radio on and Jonah Lewie was playing on either BBC Radio Nottingham or Radio Trent. Unwrapping the paper and finding toys, books, and anything else that I might have wanted, and if I didn't get it, then I would go shopping during that precious "bridge between Christmas and New Year" pre-January sales.

It's also ironic how you can associate personal things with actual things that happened during a specific Christmas one year. For example, I had got a Petite typewriter for Christmas in 1986, and I remember this because Jackie Wilson's Reet Petite was the Christmas number one that year! - How ironic was that, despite that not being a Christmas song?

After the church service (that I wasn't too bothered about back in those days), there was some Disney cartoon film on the television (I remember Dumbo premiered in 1986), TOTP (when 1980s acts like Band Aid, Shaky, Jackie Wilson, and the Pet Shop Boys used to dominate); and then the Queen, (who had black hair in those days), and then the film (during the days when ITV showings didn't have as many DFS "sale starts 10 am Boxing Day" adverts every 25 minutes).

Evening television - more variety and fewer soap operas, until Hilda Ogden decided to hang up her curlers in 1987 anyway. The ITN bulletin had swapped a football for a Christmas pudding for their sports results. So many sherry adverts on the television. We had more entertainment - Blankety Blank, 3-2-1, Two Ronnies, etc. And a James Bond film - an ad break meant a chance to nip to the toilet, or find out about the Texas Homecare sale.

Of course it was better when it was at home.

staffslad
19-12-2017, 08:39
Same here staffslad :) Some to spend and some to put in my Birmingham & Midshires building society account. Sadly no more as B&Mids BS no longer exists. I believe it was bought out by one of the major players; Halifax or Leeds BS maybe





Birmingham Midshires still exists, but they closed all their branches many years ago to become a telephone/internet/postal BS. I still have a couple of accounts with them that I opened while they still had branches.

George 1978
19-12-2017, 10:56
I had only heard of Birmingham Midshires when I watched a Central West ad break in the mid 1990s, although I am certain that had a branch here in Nottingham.

Back on topic: I remember the family putting a indoor cotton "washing line" in the living room to hang the Christmas cards on - sometimes too many cards on it and would fall down. I use Blu-Tack on a noticeboard these days.

Richard1978
19-12-2017, 14:16
I had only heard of Birmingham Midshires when I watched a Central West ad break in the mid 1990s, although I am certain that had a branch here in Nottingham.

Back on topic: I remember the family putting a indoor cotton "washing line" in the living room to hang the Christmas cards on - sometimes too many cards on it and would fall down. I use Blu-Tack on a noticeboard these days.

My parents still put their cars on a ribbon hanging on a door with blu-tak.

George 1978
19-12-2017, 15:57
I have always found the cotton too weak for the cards to be hung on - occasionally when spring cleaning, we could find odd bits of broken cotton from previous Christmases stuck to the wall.

I used to have a cork noticeboard at my old place, and I used to pin them onto there. It would mean that the cards would have a pin prick on them on, but at least they stay up a bit longer.

staffslad
20-12-2017, 20:22
I remember my mum putting up a string for Christmas cards back in the days when we used to get so many. Nowadays, we get far fewer as older people pass away.

Danniella
20-12-2017, 21:58
I remember i got a china tea set for Christmas when i was about 6, i got into bed with it after opening it in the early hours, it had water in the teapot and i put my mums best coat over my bed to keep the covers dry, but as i made tea mums coat got soaked!

staffslad
22-12-2017, 11:21
Growing up, as much as possible was made rather than bought. The Christmas pudding, Christmas cake, mince pies etc, as well as decorations for tree and rooms.

I remember fruit soaking in alcohol for days prior to making the pudding and cake. Everyone had to take a turn at stirring it and a 6d was put into the mixture. My gran made the mince pies. She made hundreds every year as neighbours would bring ingredients and ask her to make them some. I don't think I tasted a shop-bought Christmas pudding, Christmas cake or mince pie until I was in my 20s. Now my gran and mum are long gone, the shop-bought ones are just not the same at all. The filling in some of those shop-bought mince pies is very poor...just a sickly, gooey mush with hardly any fruit. The Christmas cake iceing was what I call proper iceing, not the roll iceing that seems to appear on many shop-bought cakes. My mum would fluff up the iceing to make it look like snow, and she had a tiny snowman, Santa and other things she would decorate it with. The cakes were rich but not sickly. Today, I find shop-bought cakes too sweet, particularly that roll iceing.

Decorations lasted many years, as did the tree. We had the same fairy perched atop our tree for decades. I recall making decorations from crepe paper that would be put in a box after Christmas and brought out next year for service again.

My gran had a tiny Christmas tree, no more than six inches in height, complete with stuck-on baubles and other decorations. She would perch it on top of her TV and that would be it as far as her tree was concerned..it took all of ten seconds to put up and take down. I have no idea what happened to it after she passed away. She also had a Santa on a spring. The end of the spring was taped to the ceiling and when you pulled Santa he would bounce up and down. Again, no idea what became of it.

Donald the Great
24-12-2017, 02:12
My mother also made the Christmas pudding the way your gran did. A Chrissie pud was not a Chrissie pud without the addition of hidden coins. None of the plastic tress of today. We had the real thing when I was growing up. Every Christmas my Dad would bring home a fir tree. You could not buy them as you can today. Expect he surrepticiously aquired it from the nearby national park. We kids spent hours making decorations out of coloured paper (no lites or even tinsel in those days). This was joined by hanging wooden decorations and shiny colored baubels. A large figure of an angel always adorned the tip of our tree. I recall on Christmas Eve Santa (Mum or Dad dressed up) coming into my room when myself and my brother were supposed to be asleep and placing our presents at the foot of our beds. Once they had arrived I could then sleep. Come morning and we not only had those on our beds but an assortment of wrapped goodies under the Chrissie tree. Christmas is such a magic time for children.

Danniella
24-12-2017, 09:25
My mother also made the Christmas pudding the way your gran did. A Chrissie pud was not a Chrissie pud without the addition of hidden coins. None of the plastic tress of today. We had the real thing when I was growing up. Every Christmas my Dad would bring home a fir tree. You could not buy them as you can today. Expect he surrepticiously aquired it from the nearby national park. We kids spent hours making decorations out of coloured paper (no lites or even tinsel in those days). This was joined by hanging wooden decorations and shiny colored baubels. A large figure of an angel always adorned the tip of our tree. I recall on Christmas Eve Santa (Mum or Dad dressed up) coming into my room when myself and my brother were supposed to be asleep and placing our presents at the foot of our beds. Once they had arrived I could then sleep. Come morning and we not only had those on our beds but an assortment of wrapped goodies under the Chrissie tree. Christmas is such a magic time for children.
Very nice memories you have. I remember making paper chains and snowflakes, then decorating the tree. We didn't have much money to spare but we always had a nice Christmas. I'm 28 now and i still believe in Father Christmas!

staffslad
24-12-2017, 13:32
I remember that on Christmas Eve morning my dad and I would go to a farm and pick up the turkey he had ordered. My mum or gran always made 2 puddings, 1 for Christmas Day and the other would be saved for Easter. We also weren't exactly flushed with money, but my parents put a bit away each week so we would have a good Christmas. For years, my aunts and uncles would hold a rotating party on Christmas Eve. Sadly, that ended years ago as some have passed away and the others are very old.

George 1978
25-12-2017, 20:48
I just wish that Christmas now was just like Christmas was back then.

Zincubus
25-12-2017, 21:48
I just wish they'd show that program where a popular celebrity goes to and chats with sick children in a hospital somewhere - I'd even settle for repeats from the 60's (Leslie Crowther ?)


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staffslad
26-12-2017, 11:19
I just wish that Christmas now was just like Christmas was back then.



I don't think it is the same after you grow out of childhood, though comes back somewhat when you have young children, as you get caught up in their excitement.

staffslad
26-12-2017, 11:32
I just wish they'd show that program where a popular celebrity goes to and chats with sick children in a hospital somewhere - I'd even settle for repeats from the 60's (Leslie Crowther ?)


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Yes, that used to be a mainstay of Christmas Day TV. There would be guests to help with the fun like Keith Harris and Orville. I also miss shows like The Grumbleweeds Christmas programme and that of Russ Abbott. I suppose modern audiences would think them unbearably twee, but I would watch them in an instant rather than the utter rubbish we have to put up with now. At least Russ, The Grumbleweeds etc made me laugh, which I rarely do when watching today's so-called comedians and those seemingly endless shows of celebrities fooling themselves that they can dance, cook etc.

big kid
26-12-2017, 12:59
Yes, that used to be a mainstay of Christmas Day TV. There would be guests to help with the fun like Keith Harris and Orville. I also miss shows like The Grumbleweeds Christmas programme and that of Russ Abbott. I suppose modern audiences would think them unbearably twee, but I would watch them in an instant rather than the utter rubbish we have to put up with now. At least Russ, The Grumbleweeds etc made me laugh, which I rarely do when watching today's so-called comedians and those seemingly endless shows of celebrities fooling themselves that they can dance, cook etc.

couldn't agree more mate. i was at a friends and had to sit through thirty minutes of a show called miranda. it was thirty minutes of shouting and laughing at your own so called jokes. i was ready to gouge out my own eyeballs after a few minutes of it being on. no wonder they advertise the samaritans before, during and after some of these show. they're enough to make anyone go and kill themselves...

Danniella
26-12-2017, 14:37
My mother also made the Christmas pudding the way your gran did. A Chrissie pud was not a Chrissie pud without the addition of hidden coins. None of the plastic tress of today. We had the real thing when I was growing up. Every Christmas my Dad would bring home a fir tree. You could not buy them as you can today. Expect he surrepticiously aquired it from the nearby national park. We kids spent hours making decorations out of coloured paper (no lites or even tinsel in those days). This was joined by hanging wooden decorations and shiny colored baubels. A large figure of an angel always adorned the tip of our tree. I recall on Christmas Eve Santa (Mum or Dad dressed up) coming into my room when myself and my brother were supposed to be asleep and placing our presents at the foot of our beds. Once they had arrived I could then sleep. Come morning and we not only had those on our beds but an assortment of wrapped goodies under the Chrissie tree. Christmas is such a magic time for children.
I still hang my stocking up :D

Danniella
26-12-2017, 14:40
I still hang my stocking up :D

Anyway Donny where are you?? We haven't been on at the same time for a while! :(

George 1978
26-12-2017, 22:27
I just wish they'd show that program where a popular celebrity goes to and chats with sick children in a hospital somewhere - I'd even settle for repeats from the 60's (Leslie Crowther ?)



Yes, Crowther did it for the BBC in the 1960s, and on ITV for the first half of the 1970s, while Jimmy Tarbuck did the second half of that decade.

Donald the Great
27-12-2017, 01:12
Very nice memories you have. I remember making paper chains and snowflakes, then decorating the tree. We didn't have much money to spare but we always had a nice Christmas. I'm 28 now and i still believe in Father Christmas! Nothing wrong still believing in Father Christmas as an adult. Keeps the magic alive.

smiles7964
03-01-2018, 21:52
Just thought I'd post a pic of some of my parents old Xmas decs that we were going through. Think they range from 50's-70's!

80sChav
03-03-2018, 15:11
Roland rat and the like and Duppledown Farm and all these kids programmes and many others of the like - geared towards Kids are many an abiding memory for (like watching Herbie and Films and the like in the late 90s ... very lkate ones)!

80sChav

Jemima
01-11-2018, 15:21
Wow, love them Smiles :D wish I could lay my hands on the ones we used to have in the 80's sadly all gone.

Jemima
01-11-2018, 15:27
Nothing wrong still believing in Father Christmas as an adult. Keeps the magic alive.

I totally agree Donald, you keep believing Nuggy :)

tex
01-11-2018, 16:56
Turkey butties

tex
01-11-2018, 16:57
Turkey butties...and a pickled onion.

Donald the Great
02-11-2018, 12:01
I totally agree Donald, you keep believing Nuggy :) Nuggy has left our little community Jemima.

Donald the Great
02-11-2018, 12:07
Who still takes time to decorate the Christmas tree ? I also place LEC lites over our bushes and around our windows. to get a wondrous festive effect.

George 1978
02-11-2018, 13:17
In the 11 months that it is in stored in the cupboard, I always keep the baubles, lights and tinsel on the Christmas tree - it saves time when getting it out in early December and setting it up. Occasionally some baubles fall off the tree and have to be put back on again but most of them stay on there.

staffslad
02-11-2018, 13:30
Turkey butties


No...no...I cannot abide turkey sandwiches. Actually, I am not a fan of turkey at all, so I have a traditional dinner without turkey but with more of those little sausages wrapped in bacon as I really like those.

I hope I don't sound like a Scrooge but Christmas has really lost its magic for me over the years. I still go through the cracker-pulling etc but I wouldn't be at all bothered if it didn't happen. Perhaps I will feel a bit of the old magic when I get grandkids. I certainly enjoyed it far more when my son was growing up and I think a bit of what kids feel about Christmas rubs off on jaded old codgers like me :)

Zincubus
02-11-2018, 13:55
No...no...I cannot abide turkey sandwiches. Actually, I am not a fan of turkey at all, so I have a traditional dinner without turkey but with more of those little sausages wrapped in bacon as I really like those.

I hope I don't sound like a Scrooge but Christmas has really lost its magic for me over the years. I still go through the cracker-pulling etc but I wouldn't be at all bothered if it didn't happen. Perhaps I will feel a bit of the old magic when I get grandkids. I certainly enjoyed it far more when my son was growing up and I think a bit of what kids feel about Christmas rubs off on jaded old codgers like me :)

Really !!?

We have chicken all the time so Turkey is a nice change at Christmas


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zabadak
02-11-2018, 14:18
No...no...I cannot abide turkey sandwiches. Actually, I am not a fan of turkey at all, so I have a traditional dinner without turkey but with more of those little sausages wrapped in bacon as I really like those.

I hope I don't sound like a Scrooge but Christmas has really lost its magic for me over the years. I still go through the cracker-pulling etc but I wouldn't be at all bothered if it didn't happen. Perhaps I will feel a bit of the old magic when I get grandkids. I certainly enjoyed it far more when my son was growing up and I think a bit of what kids feel about Christmas rubs off on jaded old codgers like me :)

Remember - a turkey is for life, not just for Xmas!;)

Richard1978
02-11-2018, 14:52
Really !!?

We have chicken all the time so Turkey is a nice change at Christmas


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Same here, I only have turkey any other time if I go to a carvery.

George 1978
02-11-2018, 15:05
Remember - a turkey is for life, not just for Xmas!;)


Orr if you were Bernard Matthews, a turkey is for a life of a successful career.

tex
02-11-2018, 16:49
Orr if you were Bernard Matthews, a turkey is for a life of a successful career.

Norfolk n good

Zincubus
02-11-2018, 18:44
Same here, I only have turkey any other time if I go to a carvery.

My old mum was hilarious whenever we visited a carvery ...

You're kinda expected to choose your meat at the start so she would ask for Turkey and be all complimentary and get half a plate of turkey ... then ask for some Lamb same thing .. then some Beef .. Pork ... she loved her food :)


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tex
03-11-2018, 13:11
My old mum was hilarious whenever we visited a carvery ...

You're kinda expected to choose your meat at the start so she would ask for Turkey and be all complimentary and get half a plate of turkey ... then ask for some Lamb same thing .. then some Beef .. Pork ... she loved her food :)


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Mmmm...Carvery, the only time i get to eat parsnips.I love the humble parsnip but my wife hates them.

Zincubus
03-11-2018, 16:06
Mmmm...Carvery, the only time i get to eat parsnips.I love the humble parsnip but my wife hates them.

I just think potatoes.. boiled , mashed and roasted .. then the gravy ... apple sauce , mint sauce ....


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Zincubus
03-11-2018, 16:08
My best memory of Christmas in the 60's is that special program with Leslie Crowther .... on Christmas morning or Christmas Eve ??

He used to visit all children's ward handing out pressies :)


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George 1978
04-11-2018, 01:09
Norfolk n good

Or indeed he would have Suffolk Kate'd them.

George 1978
04-11-2018, 01:10
My best memory of Christmas in the 60's is that special program with Leslie Crowther .... on Christmas morning or Christmas Eve ??

He used to visit all children's ward handing out pressies :)



It was on Christmas morning at 10.00 am before the church service in the early 1970s.

I met Crowther myself back in 1987 although it wasn't on Christmas morning but one day in August when he was invited to open a new shop up for the first time.

staffslad
04-11-2018, 11:22
I remember the Christmas Day Leslie Crowther programme very well. There would also be a few entertainers tagging along with him.

In the 80s when I had a video recorder I would record all the kids shows, particularly on Christmas Day, then when my cousin's or friends' kids visited I would play the tape knowing they had almost certainly not seen them due to being too excited with their new toys. It's funny, but that is something I miss about Christmas now I have no-one to record them for.

Trickyvee
04-11-2018, 14:40
I think Christmas began to lose its shine for me around my mid teens and Iíve been a grumpy old Scrooge ever since. I do enjoy putting up the Christmas tree as it looks pretty (although some years I havenít bothered because Iíve been too meh) and I like having a dinner with family but other than that Iíd rather it didnít happen. Iím not a traditionalist so doing the same old things every year gets on my nerves, and I donít like all the fuss, needless spending and tat.

George 1978
05-11-2018, 20:32
In the 80s when I had a video recorder I would record all the kids shows, particularly on Christmas Day, then when my cousin's or friends' kids visited I would play the tape knowing they had almost certainly not seen them due to being too excited with their new toys. It's funny, but that is something I miss about Christmas now I have no-one to record them for.

It wasn't until 1991 when I started to do that as well - I heard that I was going to become an uncle and that my nephew was to be born the following June, so as I got a pack of two Bush E240 blank tapes from Woolworths while doing Christmas shopping in Leicester, and I decided to record some programmes for when he was older and could see them.

I don't have the tapes anymore, but I recorded the premiere of Father Christmas from Channel 4 as well as that year's showing of The Snowman. I also recorded a CFF film seen during the early hours of the morning, and also a Disney film complete with the Central region sales adverts on them. It was only many years later that I recorded The Queen, the Midnight Mass and other traditional stuff each year.

Back to the present (and I don't mean "Christmas" present): I went to do a huge food shopping spree at Asda this afternoon and anyone would have thought it was December 5th instead of November 5th! The manufacturers probably think that Christmas is a month earlier this year - just like last year, the year before and so on.

Jemima
05-11-2018, 20:59
What a thoughtful thing to do George, you must be a lovely uncle :) I know what you mean about the trolleys looking like it's Christmas already, earlier on it was chaos in Tesco, there was a manic feel in the air and people had trolleys bulging with Quality Street, boxes of peanuts, boxes of biscuits, cranberry sauce, crackers the lot!!

Zincubus
05-11-2018, 23:13
What a thoughtful thing to do George, you must be a lovely uncle :) I know what you mean about the trolleys looking like it's Christmas already, earlier on it was chaos in Tesco, there was a manic feel in the air and people had trolleys bulging with Quality Street, boxes of peanuts, boxes of biscuits, cranberry sauce, crackers the lot!!

I wish Christmas palaver would begin 1st December and no sooner !!

There have been xmas movies on Sky since early OCTOBER !!!


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George 1978
05-11-2018, 23:45
I wouldn't be surprised it shops had started to sell advent calendars with 54 windows on them!

I don't know about this year, but last year Clinton Cards (in Nottingham's Victoria Centre at least) were selling boxes of Christmas cards in the third week of September. I am a shamed to say that I bought half a dozen boxes of them in that month as well.

A word in the ears of the Greeting Cards Association might not be a bad idea...

Donald the Great
05-11-2018, 23:58
My mother always made the Christmas pudding. A Chrissie pud was not a Chrissie pud without the addition of hidden coins. The hunt was on for who found the most money.They were the recipient of a special gift from memory. When it came to the Chrissie tree, there was none of the plastic trees of today. We had the real thing when I was growing up. Every Christmas Eve my Dad would bring home a fir tree. He would drive into the nearby national park and purloin one. How he avoided detection by the police is anyone's guess. We kids spent hours making decorations out of coloured paper (no lites or even tinsel in those days). This was joined by hanging wooden decorations and shiny colored baubels. A large figure of an angel always adorned the tip of our tree. I recall on Christmas Eve Santa (Mum or Dad dressed up) coming into my room when myself and my brother were supposed to be asleep and placing our presents at the foot of our beds. Once they had arrived I could then sleep. Come morning and we not only had those on our beds but an assortment of wrapped goodies under the Chrissie tree. I have wonderful memories of my childhood Christmas. It is such a magical time for children.

Jemima
06-11-2018, 10:23
What wonderful memories Donald, we NEVER forget the magic of our childhood Christmases do we, l think they stay with us forever. It sounds like you had some very special ones...coins in the handmade pudding, real Christmas tree your Dad brought home ( l do love a real one), and the simple pleasures of making the tree decorations, memories to treasure indeed. It's all become so commercialised now.

staffslad
06-11-2018, 11:43
My mom used to make at least 2 Christmas puddings each year: 1 for Christmas Day and another for Easter Sunday, plus sometimes 1 for someone else. She put the fruit in brandy and let it soak for a few days or maybe a week. We all used to take it in turns to stir the puddings--can't recall if that was to bring good luck. She would put 6d coins in the puddings and then 5p coins after decimalisation--I think the coins had to be silver. She would do this in September. The Christmas cake would also have its fruit soaking in brandy for a week and she always used traditional icing made from icing sugar with a bit of lemon essence in it to take away too much sweetness, not that awful roll icing that seems to cover most shop-bought Christmas cakes nowadays. The cake would also have a thick layer of marzipan below the icing.

I can't remember having a real tree, it was always artificial as far as I recall, but it lasted many years. Our decorations were a mix of shop-bought and homemade, with the same ones being used year after year.

Food items like dates and figs we would have only at Christmas, together with a bottle of cheap Spanish white wine. A mince pie and a tot of whisky would be left out for Father Christmas, and a carrot and glass of milk for Rudolf--perhaps Rudolf shared with the other reindeer.

My grandmother always made the mince pies and they were honestly the best I have ever tasted. She made hundreds each year. Neighbours would give her ingredients and ask her to make their mince pies. I don't think I tasted a shop-bought mince pie until I was in my twenties.

My dad knew the local farmers and one would give him a fresh turkey every year. He and I would collect it on Christmas Eve morning and my dad would take the farmer something in return.

On Christmas Day morning you would see kids running around kicking new footballs and riding new bikes, and lots of girls pushing dolls' prams. Today, most kids are indoors Christmas Day playing on their new IPhones, games consoles and so forth.

My grandparents lived about 200 yards away so after opening presents I would run round to wish them a happy Christmas and there would be a selection box waiting for me as well as their present which I had already opened at home. My grandfather had terrible arthritis and was bedridden, so my mom and dad would cook my grandparents' dinner with ours and take it to them. Around 4pm we would all go there for tea. After my grandfather died my grandmother would come to our house and spend all day with us, then would do the same at my uncle's house on Boxing Day.

Also on Christmas Day morning in the 80s, we would go round to our next door neighbours' house to wish them happy Christmas and their kids would show me all the toys they had gotten.

Back in those days Christmas seemed to come very suddenly, rather than being the long drawn out process it is now. Commercialisation has always been present in Christmas, but I would agree that it is now at a far higher level than it was, with people feeling pressured to spend money they cannot afford on expensive presents, mountains of food and drink etc in an effort to capture the perfect, idealised Christmas that adverts and the mass media like to portray.

tex
06-11-2018, 13:05
I am one of six children and christmas was undoubtedly a very expensive time for my mam and dad, however we always had piles of pressies not under the tree but in seperate piles around the sitting room for each of us. Jimmy saville would be on telly on the kiddies ward, then we would watch the wizard of oz while mam was sweating in the kitchen.

George 1978
06-11-2018, 13:53
My Mum used to make at least 2 Christmas puddings each year: 1 for Christmas Day and another for Easter Sunday,

A Christmas Pudding for Easter? Are they in the shops all year round, I wonder?

George 1978
06-11-2018, 13:58
I just read that you said that your mother made it, and not bought it. Still, it is very unusual to have traditional Christmas food at Easter.

staffslad
06-11-2018, 17:05
I just read that you said that your mother made it, and not bought it. Still, it is very unusual to have traditional Christmas food at Easter.


Yes, we had a homemade Christmas pudding on Easter Sunday for decades. We still do, only now my wife buys 2 puddings prior to Christmas as my mother passed away a few years ago.

George 1978
06-11-2018, 18:51
If we play our cards right, the Easter eggs might be in the shops in time for Christmas. :)

Donald the Great
06-11-2018, 23:57
What wonderful memories Donald, we NEVER forget the magic of our childhood Christmases do we, l think they stay with us forever. It sounds like you had some very special ones...coins in the handmade pudding, real Christmas tree your Dad brought home ( l do love a real one), and the simple pleasures of making the tree decorations, memories to treasure indeed. It's all become so commercialised now. Yes wonderful memories Jemima. You can not commercialise a special time like Christmas. It is tradition and tradition must be retained.

George 1978
07-11-2018, 13:33
Yes wonderful memories Jemima. You can not commercialise a special time like Christmas. It is tradition and tradition must be retained.

The problem that Christmas is too commercialised, and yes, it should remain as a tradition.

tex
07-11-2018, 15:37
Christmas movies i MUST watch every year....

Scrooge....Albert finney version
Scrooge....Alistair sim version
Muppets christmas carol .................................... THATS A WHOLE LOTTA SCROOGE!
miracle on 34th st
Deck the halls

Zincubus
07-11-2018, 16:42
Christmas movies i MUST watch every year....

Scrooge....Albert finney version
Scrooge....Alistair sim version
Muppets christmas carol .................................... THATS A WHOLE LOTTA SCROOGE!
miracle on 34th st
Deck the halls

You were sooo close :)

We watch the Albert Finney one . .. love it when he " sees the light " and starts spending !!

Then the newer Jim Carey version .

Those two are so different yet sooo marvellous in their own ways


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darren
07-11-2018, 17:32
Yes jemima it is so commercialised nowadays.

I remember one time we had a real tree and pine needles falling everywhere.
My mind a tad hazy:D Ii think i remembered than pine needle tree.

most years we had this tiny tree that im sure we sat on top of the tv cant do it now as tellies are very thin.



what wonderful memories donald, we never forget the magic of our childhood christmases do we, l think they stay with us forever. It sounds like you had some very special ones...coins in the handmade pudding, real christmas tree your dad brought home ( l do love a real one), and the simple pleasures of making the tree decorations, memories to treasure indeed. It's all become so commercialised now.

Richard1978
07-11-2018, 23:17
I always try to watch It's A Wonderful Life or one of the Home Alone films.

Donald the Great
08-11-2018, 00:59
You were sooo close :)

We watch the Albert Finney one . .. love it when he " sees the light " and starts spending !!

Then the newer Jim Carey version .

Those two are so different yet sooo marvellous in their own ways


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro The great Alistair Sims is my fav Scrooge.

George 1978
08-11-2018, 11:30
The fact that Father Christmas' red cloak was because of Coca Cola's branding just shows you how Christmas has been commercialised even may decades ago - his cloak used to be green prior to that I seem to remember reading.

staffslad
08-11-2018, 12:13
The fact that Father Christmas' red cloak was because of Coca Cola's branding just shows you how Christmas has been commercialised even may decades ago - his cloak used to be green prior to that I seem to remember reading.


My understanding is that he was depicted in different colours, though red was still the most common, and the Coca Cola ad campaign of the 30s just cemented red in the public consciousness as the colour associated with the character.

Richard1978
08-11-2018, 14:29
My understanding is that he was depicted in different colours, though red was still the most common, and the Coca Cola ad campaign of the 30s just cemented red in the public consciousness as the colour associated with the character.

Yes there's plenty of Victorian Christmas cards with Santa Claus wearing red & white, among other colours, but it seemed to be Coca Cola that put those colours into the public consciousness.

George 1978
08-11-2018, 21:28
My understanding is that he was depicted in different colours, though red was still the most common, and the Coca Cola ad campaign of the 30s just cemented red in the public consciousness as the colour associated with the character.

I don't like to think that the tradition of how Father Christmas looks is lined to a commercialised product as it feels wrong even if we think of red as being traditional - it has comparisons in many ways with people who used to say that the black door of 10 Downing Street used to be a colour other than black, or the big red book on This is Your Life used to be green and so on. Things are supposed to be of a traditional colour. Gold post boxes, anyone?

The irony with advertising in the 1930s is that it was seen in a monochrome form, be it in a newspaper or on television in the United States if they had them back then - not a bad way of getting the colour red across back then!

When you think about it, a lot of judges in courts wear a red cloak which are similar to Father Christmas' "uniform" - I assume that the tradition comes from that when people in authority in the 18th and 19th centuries used to wear red cloaks.

George 1978
08-11-2018, 21:31
Yes there's plenty of Victorian Christmas cards with Santa Claus wearing red & white, among other colours, but it seemed to be Coca Cola that put those colours into the public consciousness.

A lot of Christmas cards may look Victorian, but they have been reproduced quite lot in a traditional way throughout the 20th century and almost to the present day - they probably would have updated the Father Christmas outfit to make it relevant to how people think of him these days. I don't think I have seen any evidence of Father Christmas wearing green - some of the elves, yes, not the big man himself.

staffslad
09-11-2018, 10:07
A lot of Christmas cards may look Victorian, but they have been reproduced quite lot in a traditional way throughout the 20th century and almost to the present day - they probably would have updated the Father Christmas outfit to make it relevant to how people think of him these days. I don't think I have seen any evidence of Father Christmas wearing green - some of the elves, yes, not the big man himself.


Prior to the 30s he was depicted in various colours, red being the most common, but I can't say that green was one of them.

This is similar to how Rudolf has been associated as the most prominent reindeer to the detriment of the traditional eight. Ask the average person on the street to name one of the reindeer and most probably it will be Rudolf.

Richard1978
09-11-2018, 13:33
Until I looked up about Rudolf, I didn't know how recent he had been created.

George 1978
09-11-2018, 16:29
Prior to the 30s he was depicted in various colours, red being the most common, but I can't say that green was one of them.

This is similar to how Rudolf has been associated as the most prominent reindeer to the detriment of the traditional eight. Ask the average person on the street to name one of the reindeer and most probably it will be Rudolf.

The thing about the 1930s as I have said before is that most archive evidence of anything like that would almost certainly be in black and white - there are very few people still around who would probably remember detail from the 1930s like that.

When one thinks about Rudolf as in the song, we think of his red nose as a characteristic, don't we? The irony is that these days "red noses" are more associated with Comic Relief rather than Christmas, and I bet that one or two people would assume that connection as well. As the song ends "you'll go down in history". Quite right too.

Wasn't that song first performed in the 1940s and if that was the case, it is seen as relatively recent in terms of how long traditions associated with Christmas have been going on?

staffslad
10-11-2018, 11:18
The thing about the 1930s as I have said before is that most archive evidence of anything like that would almost certainly be in black and white - there are very few people still around who would probably remember detail from the 1930s like that.

When one thinks about Rudolf as in the song, we think of his red nose as a characteristic, don't we? The irony is that these days "red noses" are more associated with Comic Relief rather than Christmas, and I bet that one or two people would assume that connection as well. As the song ends "you'll go down in history". Quite right too.

Wasn't that song first performed in the 1940s and if that was the case, it is seen as relatively recent in terms of how long traditions associated with Christmas have been going on?


Yes, I think there is quite a bit of truth to that. Traditians that we assume to be very old are actually fairly recent. That makes me wonder how Christmas traditians will change and evolve over the decades to come. I have little doubt that Christmas itself will survive, but how it will be celebrated in 50 or 100 years time is interesting.

George 1978
10-11-2018, 14:47
It's interesting that a lot of people say that they are "starting a tradition" - the question is, how do we know it will be a tradition if it has only just started? That so-called tradition could possibly only happen just for that year (or a couple of years at the most) and then it stops. It needs to run for many years before anyone can call it a tradition, and I bet that even Christmas was like that back in the first century.

The Queen (or "The King" before her) has broadcast on television at 3.00 pm on Christmas Day since the 1950s at least, and has prepared a speech since the 1930s - now that is traditional to recent generations, but it is a relatively new thing when one thinks of how a lot of traditions have been going on.

tex
18-11-2018, 12:58
It's interesting that a lot of people say that they are "starting a tradition" - the question is, how do we know it will be a tradition if it has only just started? That so-called tradition could possibly only happen just for that year (or a couple of years at the most) and then it stops. It needs to run for many years before anyone can call it a tradition, and I bet that even Christmas was like that back in the first century.

The Queen (or "The King" before her) has broadcast on television at 3.00 pm on Christmas Day since the 1950s at least, and has prepared a speech since the 1930s - now that is traditional to recent generations, but it is a relatively new thing when one thinks of how a lot of traditions have been going on.

Poor choice of wording, TRYING to start a new tradition might be more appropriate

George 1978
19-11-2018, 05:40
Poor choice of wording, TRYING to start a new tradition might be more appropriate

There is not much difference between doing something and trying to do something. For example, if I am trying on a pair of shoes, I am wearing them, otherwise I wouldn't be trying them on. If I am trying a new food, I am eating it (unless I spit it out) etc.

tex
19-11-2018, 14:27
There is not much difference between doing something and trying to do something. For example, if I am trying on a pair of shoes, I am wearing them, otherwise I wouldn't be trying them on. If I am trying a new food, I am eating it (unless I spit it out) etc.

Aspirations to create something from nothing

George 1978
19-11-2018, 17:06
Aspirations to create something from nothing

I think they are the same.

tex
20-11-2018, 12:51
I think they are the same.

You ok George? Noticed some splitting of hairs in your recent posts both here and in the coincidences thread.

George 1978
20-11-2018, 17:10
You ok George? Noticed some splitting of hairs in your recent posts both here and in the coincidences thread.

I am pleased that you have noticed - the clashing of views from members is something that I avoid at all costs, and I prefer it if we all got on with each other.

No, I have had some personal difficulties as of late, depression etc, and as I am sure you know, it can get on top of you when everything comes along at once.

I was thinking about taking a break from this forum, but then again, I feel that if I shouldn't run away from here and that I should keep going on.

At least until Christmas (he says, trying to bring things back on topic). :)

tex
21-11-2018, 12:43
you would be missed around here George.

George 1978
21-11-2018, 16:54
you would be missed around here George.

I shall keep posting on here as often as I can.

Zincubus
21-11-2018, 18:28
I shall keep posting on here as often as I can.

The oldest set of twins were 102 yesterday ...


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Zincubus
21-11-2018, 18:47
I am pleased that you have noticed - the clashing of views from members is something that I avoid at all costs, and I prefer it if we all got on with each other.

No, I have had some personal difficulties as of late, depression etc, and as I am sure you know, it can get on top of you when everything comes along at once.

I was thinking about taking a break from this forum, but then again, I feel that if I shouldn't run away from here and that I should keep going on.

At least until Christmas (he says, trying to bring things back on topic). :)

Just noticed that bit about depression and sadly it's something I've dallied with myself for decades - as long as I can remember to be honest and I'm 60.

I'm a worrier and get very anxious over little things and even things that MAY happen !!

Our son moved to the states as few years ago and even though I'm totally obsessed with music I didn't listen to a single song for NINE MONTHS - without even realising !!

Now when I stop listening to music for a few days and only listen to Radio 5 or TalkSport the wife notices and gives me a 'talking to '

A couple of close family members have encouraged me to see the Doc and get some tablets but I don't take any medication and I don't like the idea of popping a few tablets .. just old fashioned I guess.

Oddly enough , when that 'cloud' drifts over I make myself listen to some real happy pop music and it works 90% of the time ..


Stick with it George !!

Sorry I'm not better with words ( dyslexic / Aspergers ) .



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George 1978
21-11-2018, 19:07
The oldest set of twins were 102 yesterday …



Yes, I saw that myself. Just proves how people are alike.

When I was younger, it was the spring and summer months that used to get me down - the light evenings meant that I had difficulty sleeping, but these days it is the autumn which ironically enough I would have looked forward to so much when I was younger. The fact that I have difficulty with relationships because of the conditions that I have is one factor. It is a truism that life can be like a stuck record, repeating itself over and over again. I do feel that I want to escape from myself if you know what I mean.

As well as depression, I get anxiety as well - I do feel that they go together, and I believe that is the case with lots of people who have it.

Anyway, five weeks to go before Christmas...

Zincubus
21-11-2018, 19:51
Yes, I saw that myself. Just proves how people are alike.

When I was younger, it was the spring and summer months that used to get me down - the light evenings meant that I had difficulty sleeping, but these days it is the autumn which ironically enough I would have looked forward to so much when I was younger. The fact that I have difficulty with relationships because of the conditions that I have is one factor. It is a truism that life can be like a stuck record, repeating itself over and over again. I do feel that I want to escape from myself if you know what I mean.

As well as depression, I get anxiety as well - I do feel that they go together, and I believe that is the case with lots of people who have it.

Anyway, five weeks to go before Christmas...

Yeah. . I had a great childhood and I've got a lovely family so Christmas has always been special to me ...




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George 1978
22-11-2018, 23:07
Yeah. . I had a great childhood and I've got a lovely family so Christmas has always been special to me …



Good for you - I always say that sending Christmas cards each year is a great way of making friends, and I send so many at the start of December I often joke that my local post box is about to topple over. I spend over £100 on postage stamps like I have done so this year - it's a pity that very few people send one back though, and it's a pity that the ones that I want them to send one to me, don't do so.

The furthest one sent each year is to someone in Australia and the nearest one is to someone who lives in the flat above me.

Donald the Great
23-11-2018, 00:01
Wow I feel all sad reading about your depression problems guys. You should start a separate thread re this. There was one on my last forum. A place to bare your soul so to speak. I did do as I had a tuff mental time decades ago too.

staffslad
23-11-2018, 11:01
From 1978 to 1994 my parents would organise an annual Christmas party for pensioners on our estate. They formed an informal committee together with 3 other local friends and neighbours to help them. To fund the party, they would hold jumble sales in our local Working Men's Club and also had bingo nights in our house--once per month during the spring and summer when it was warm and light at night. Around the middle of October, my mother and I would draw up an invitation, have it copied and deliver it to all the houses where pensioners lived. There would be a slip to fill in and return to our house so they would know how many were coming to the party. The party would be held at the Working Men's Club, only a few hundred yards away. They would provide a traditional Christmas 3-course meal for the pensioners, all cooked and served by my parents and their 3 friends. Anyone who had trouble walking was taken by car--often I did that job. After the party meal there would be songs and bingo. The pensioners also got an envelope each with a couple of pounds in it. Around 70 pensioners would come to the party, which was held on the first or second Saturday in December. Only once was the weather so bad that the party had to be postponed until the following week.

tex
23-11-2018, 11:50
From 1978 to 1994 my parents would organise an annual Christmas party for pensioners on our estate. They formed an informal committee together with 3 other local friends and neighbours to help them. To fund the party, they would hold jumble sales in our local Working Men's Club and also had bingo nights in our house--once per month during the spring and summer when it was warm and light at night. Around the middle of October, my mother and I would draw up an invitation, have it copied and deliver it to all the houses where pensioners lived. There would be a slip to fill in and return to our house so they would know how many were coming to the party. The party would be held at the Working Men's Club, only a few hundred yards away. They would provide a traditional Christmas 3-course meal for the pensioners, all cooked and served by my parents and their 3 friends. Anyone who had trouble walking was taken by car--often I did that job. After the party meal there would be songs and bingo. The pensioners also got an envelope each with a couple of pounds in it. Around 70 pensioners would come to the party, which was held on the first or second Saturday in December. Only once was the weather so bad that the party had to be postponed until the following week.

A great sense of community rarely seen these days unfortunately

staffslad
23-11-2018, 13:44
A great sense of community rarely seen these days unfortunately


Yes, growing up we would get many Christmas cards from neighbours all round our estate. Nowadays, we get hardly any. Most have either passed away or moved away, and the new ones just don't have anywhere near the sense of community that used to exist. Social isolation is a problem now and it is going to get worse in the future.

tex
23-11-2018, 17:18
Yes, growing up we would get many Christmas cards from neighbours all round our estate. Nowadays, we get hardly any. Most have either passed away or moved away, and the new ones just don't have anywhere near the sense of community that used to exist. Social isolation is a problem now and it is going to get worse in the future.

I know it's been blamed for a lot but the advent of mobile phones has killed the art of conversation, many people will now send a greeting by text instead of selecting, writing and then posting a card. I believe a card can also be sent digitally now

George 1978
23-11-2018, 22:17
Yes, growing up we would get many Christmas cards from neighbours all round our estate. Nowadays, we get hardly any. Most have either passed away or moved away, and the new ones just don't have anywhere near the sense of community that used to exist. Social isolation is a problem now and it is going to get worse in the future.

I know it has been mentioned before, but a lot of Primary Schools in the 1980s had a portable cardboard post box (painted red of course) which would usually be situated next to the secretary's office where one could send Christmas cards to people in other classes as soon as the start of December came around, as long as you wrote the recipient's name on the envelope, along with the class number or teacher's name at the top, and the monitors (aka amateur postmen) would sort it out and send them along to the relevant classes the next school day. I used to enjoy it when the girls sent me Christmas cards - I used to love their handwriting! But it is that community spirit within an institution such as a school that helps that sort of thing. If a national corporation like the Royal Mail can do it for 310 days a year, then surely a small school can.

And even now I still try and keep that spirit going - as I said before in early December I spend over £100 on stamps and send Christmas cards in the post to people I have known over the years who have been in the same groups and organisations that I have been a member of, and have kept in touch - one organisation I was a member of had a booklet a few years ago which listed over 120 members with addresses, and they are familiar with me because of that, and I do try and send them all one in December. As a result, I do get quite a few of them plastered all over my walls by the start of the fourth week of December. My late mother used to say that one should do as one would be done by, in other words, if you are nice to someone then they should be nice to you in return, although in present day 2018 style, that isn't always the case anymore compared to 30 or 40 years ago.

And birthdays (my own of course) I think of as being a similar thing - however, birthdays are worse than Christmas as they often fall on ordinary days of the year. I hardly get any birthday cards each year, but I got loads for my 40th this year as I wrote to people I knew using a fictitious alias as "my friend", referring to myself as the "third person" and telling them that it was his (my) birthday coming up - I was lucky to get two each year but I got around 45 of them in time for my birthday from friends, neighbours where I used to live and distant relations that I had not heard from in years. Admittedly, not all of them responded but a good proportion did - it did get a bit controversial in some ways but it was worth it at the end of the day. It was a milestone and I wanted it to be special - because of my social difficulties I had made that extra effort.

tex
24-11-2018, 13:49
£100 on postage stamps must be around 200 cards!..I applaud you

George 1978
24-11-2018, 19:10
£100 on postage stamps must be around 200 cards!..I applaud you

143 Christmas cards so far this year - I counted them by numbering the back of each envelope so that I could keep track of them!

Writing letters and cards is my preferred method of communication - I am a bit of a Henry Root or Robin Cooper at times (even with the "Disgusted of Tunbridge Wels" type of letters that I send!) I feel that it is better than communicating face to face because of my anxiety and social difficulties.

Also, as I said before, you can make a lot of friends (or at least try to) by posting them a Christmas card each year - who needs Facebook when you can do it the traditional way?

George 1978
24-11-2018, 19:17
I must add that I have not posted those Christmas cards just yet, mind you - I plan to do that in around a week's time, travelling around the different red post boxes in Nottingham (and probably beyond as well...)

staffslad
25-11-2018, 09:32
I remember the school postbox at primary school and someone bringing cards round to each class. At secondary school it was just the usual card exchanges, no postbox. I, too, used to look forward to getting a card from the girls. I kept a card I got from a girl I really liked for years afterward.

I wonder if the generation growing up will keep up the tradition of sending paper cards or will just greet each other by texts, facebook posts and other electronic means?

Arran
25-11-2018, 11:06
I know it has been mentioned before, but a lot of Primary Schools in the 1980s had a portable cardboard post box (painted red of course) which would usually be situated next to the secretary's office where one could send Christmas cards to people in other classes as soon as the start of December came around, as long as you wrote the recipient's name on the envelope, along with the class number or teacher's name at the top, and the monitors (aka amateur postmen) would sort it out and send them along to the relevant classes the next school day.

Was it true that these post boxes came to an end because bullies posted razor blades to kids that they didn't like?

staffslad
25-11-2018, 15:40
Was it true that these post boxes came to an end because bullies posted razor blades to kids that they didn't like?


Have they come to an end? If so, I didn't know. I've never heard about razor blades being posted. It sounds like an urban myth, like razor blades in apples at Halloween, but I don't know. When my son was at junior school in the early 2000s there were still postboxes at his school.

Zincubus
25-11-2018, 19:02
Have they come to an end? If so, I didn't know. I've never heard about razor blades being posted. It sounds like an urban myth, like razor blades in apples at Halloween, but I don't know. When my son was at junior school in the early 2000s there were still postboxes at his school.

Yeah .. sounds a bit like the stories that you get your head shoved down the toilet when ya first go to high school


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George 1978
25-11-2018, 20:24
Was it true that these post boxes came to an end because bullies posted razor blades to kids that they didn't like?

I have never heard of that one, but if one gets to the age where one starts to shave then it could be their way of trying to tell you something...

tex
26-11-2018, 15:27
So...black friday and cyber monday, does anybody wait to do xmas shopping on these days and are there substantial savings to be had? Some circles are saying that its all a con and that the prices being offered on many goods can be found at most times of the year. Its also being blamed for the death of the high street and one of the main reasons so many shops are shutting down. if so i am guilty as charged because i buy most things online at christmas.

Arran
26-11-2018, 20:42
I think that one of the biggest differences between Christmas in the 1990s and Christmas now is that people bought gifts in shops but increasingly buy gifts online now. Town centres used to be packed out with shoppers in the run up to Christmas but in more recent years crowds have noticeably dwindled. Thousands of kids would descend on Toys R Us every December to pick out toys they wanted. More often than not, parents bought the toys at times when their kids weren't with them and it was commonplace for popular toys to sell out. One year desperate parents were buying Thunderbirds Tracy Island off other parents in shopping centres and the Toys R Us car park at more than twice the price when shops had sold out. Toys R Us is no more.

George 1978
26-11-2018, 20:49
I don't think that Black Friday really works in Britain - in this country shoppers are (or should be in a stereotypical way) calm, friendly and are very good at queueing - well, around 50 years ago at least. Black Friday indicates the opposite - people getting hurt, security guards having their work cut out, police being called etc. In recent years I have tried to avoid shopping on those days. We just cannot adopt American traditions like that - it just doesn't work very well over here. And I would stay away from Oxford Street in Central London on those days as well.

Around 10 to 15 years ago, Black Friday (now Mad Friday) meant the Friday before Christmas (17th to 23rd December) where people get drunk and legless, and all that sort of thing. In Wales, Black Friday means something different like that:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-wales-30538419/999-crews-get-set-for-black-friday-in-wales

I prefer "Back to normal Monday" (4th to 10th January) which is the week before Blue Monday.

George 1978
26-11-2018, 21:02
I think that one of the biggest differences between Christmas in the 1990s and Christmas now is that people bought gifts in shops but increasingly buy gifts online now. Town centres used to be packed out with shoppers in the run up to Christmas but in more recent years crowds have noticeably dwindled. Thousands of kids would descend on Toys R Us every December to pick out toys they wanted. More often than not, parents bought the toys at times when their kids weren't with them and it was commonplace for popular toys to sell out. One year desperate parents were buying Thunderbirds Tracy Island off other parents in shopping centres and the Toys R Us car park at more than twice the price when shops had sold out. Toys R Us is no more.

Victoria Centre in Nottingham (which I affectionally think Nottingham's answer to London's Oxford Street) is often packed during the Wednesdays before Christmas - sometimes you can't move forwards because of shoppers going in both directions. Don't get me wrong - an atmosphere where so many people are going to purchase Christmas presents feels like a high spirited environment, but you do feel that the reason why they are there in the first place is due to commercialisation. One of my nephew's birthday is a week before Christmas, and so I had to get a birthday present for him while most were getting Christmas ones, and of course, the birthday cards in Clinton's and WHSmith were incognito because of Christmas cards on display.

As I said before, the Friday before Christmas is one of the biggest Christmas shopping days - when Robot Wars was on BBC 2, the Sir Killalot toy was on sale in Argos, on that day in 2001 and I spent around £165 on getting two of them for my nephew and getting the batteries that weren't included (there were three batteries as there was a "buy two get one free" offer on them). Along with seven bags of Tesco shopping, I had to get a taxi back home (although I felt that I needed a removal van!) When it came to, I had got the wrong Robot Wars toy, and so the following day, they had to go back to Argos in the boot of a relative's car, whilst I ended up playing Hide and Seek on Friday evening and trying to find where I put the damn receipt that I put down somewhere. I tell you, Christmas shopping can be frustrating in itself, even if the end results come the 25th can be rewarding.

Arran
27-11-2018, 12:42
Is Christmas still a religious celebration? It was in 1800 but by 1900 it had started to become commercialised and take on customs that were unrecognisable in 1800. I can remember learning about Christmas past at primary school.

In the 17th century Christmas was banned in England by the Puritans because they thought it was a decadent Catholic celebration that early Christians did not recognise. In Scotland the Presbyterian Church once discouraged people from celebrating Christmas and did not recognise it as an official Christian celebration.

George 1978
27-11-2018, 20:17
Is Christmas still a religious celebration?

I hope that no one from the Church of England has read that! Any vicars or clergymen on here please feel free to officially answer! I am a bit surprised that such an obvious question has been asked!

We still have the Midnight Mass and the Christmas morning service on BBC 1 each year - churches have Christmas morning services, etc. I think that Christmas will always be a religious celebration for a long time to come, hence the fact that it is still celebrated - the commercial side of things have sidelined things certainly in the past 50 years or so. When I was younger (as a six year old back in 1984 for example), my first thought of Christmas was receiving presents and having new toys to play with, rather than the thought of the birth of Jesus - the Nativity play which is performed in Primary schools is a reminder of the religious side of things - that and the carol services are there as reminder to youngsters that it is not all a "bargain basement" fest.

As an adult, (and I am talking personally here in a way), we think of having a sip of sherry from a pony glass and a few After Eight mints as soon as midnight arrives, and wondering whether we will be sober enough to get to the nearest DFS on Boxing Day and buy that sofa which was advertised during the commercial break of Coronation Street. Christmas means different things to people of different ages (and often different generations as well). In true Mr Bean style, I tried to retain the child's aspect of Christmas for myself when I got older, but I think that it is nostalgia doing that rather than keep traditions alive.

Also, which side would you think that Father Christmas would take on this? Would he represent the religious side because of the traditional aspects of the character, or would be on the commercial side - after all, as we have mentioned earlier on, his red coat was as a result of Coca-Cola's advertising, and also the fact that he delivers presents to children in the middle of the night - he seems to be very much of a consumer person considering that he appears in advertisements, gives children Mars branded chocolate etc - perhaps he should be an employee of Tesco or WHSmith rather than the Church of England? He may represent the role as "postman" because of that - after all, what is religious about delivering parcels?

Another point is that in this country at least, Jewish and Muslim festivals are understandably not celebrated like that, although Hindus do a great Diwali celebration when it comes around each year. I know that there are still people and families who think of Christmas as a religious from the outset.

staffslad
27-11-2018, 20:44
Like it or not, I think Black Friday/Cyber Monday is here to stay. I agree that we don't want to see the chaos that sometimes occurs in the US being duplicated here in the UK. Personally, I would not go out shopping on those days, but I have made purchases online, mainly for Christmas presents. I do think that there are genuine sales out there, but of course it always pays to keep your head screwed on. I saved between 30% and 50% on the items I bought, but I want to stress that these were gifts that I would have had to buy anyway; I would not spend on Black Friday just for the sake of spending.

Yes, online shopping is seriously denting many high street shops sales nowadays. Although I don't like to see shops close and people lose their jobs, I can't really see what can be done about it. If people prefer to sit at home and shop online, then that is what they will do. It's just how shopping is evolving.

George 1978
28-11-2018, 00:17
I believe that Woolworths and MFI were victims of that sort of thing ten years ago - in their 1970s and 1980s heyday they were very strong on the High Street with Christmas advertising and sales - nearly everyone got their baubles and Christmas fairy lights from Woolworths (Woolco). Online shopping has given that an extra dimension in which some can't quite keep up with. How many times have we heard of "Acme Stores Limited goes into administration" in news reports? With the Credit Crunch of ten years ago we heard of it several times in a week.

I saw this cartoon in Private Eye a couple of months ago, showing how methods of shopping has changed in the past 20 years - in 1998, the caption was "they've got a website", where in 2018, it was "they're got a High Street store".

I use Tesco for online shopping, only because there isn't a big store in the area I live in - I believe that Tesco will be the survivors in all of this. Look at the Sainsbury's - Asda proposed merger from earlier on this year which has seemed to have cooled down as if late. There is an Asda and a Sainsbury's so close to where I live, and it would be interesting which one would close if the merger or takeover goes ahead.

Arran
28-11-2018, 10:26
I hope that no one from the Church of England has read that! Any vicars or clergymen on here please feel free to officially answer! I am a bit surprised that such an obvious question has been asked!

We still have the Midnight Mass and the Christmas morning service on BBC 1 each year - churches have Christmas morning services, etc. I think that Christmas will always be a religious celebration for a long time to come, hence the fact that it is still celebrated - the commercial side of things have sidelined things certainly in the past 50 years or so. When I was younger (as a six year old back in 1984 for example), my first thought of Christmas was receiving presents and having new toys to play with, rather than the thought of the birth of Jesus - the Nativity play which is performed in Primary schools is a reminder of the religious side of things - that and the carol services are there as reminder to youngsters that it is not all a "bargain basement" fest.

As an adult, (and I am talking personally here in a way), we think of having a sip of sherry from a pony glass and a few After Eight mints as soon as midnight arrives, and wondering whether we will be sober enough to get to the nearest DFS on Boxing Day and buy that sofa which was advertised during the commercial break of Coronation Street. Christmas means different things to people of different ages (and often different generations as well). In true Mr Bean style, I tried to retain the child's aspect of Christmas for myself when I got older, but I think that it is nostalgia doing that rather than keep traditions alive.

Also, which side would you think that Father Christmas would take on this? Would he represent the religious side because of the traditional aspects of the character, or would be on the commercial side - after all, as we have mentioned earlier on, his red coat was as a result of Coca-Cola's advertising, and also the fact that he delivers presents to children in the middle of the night - he seems to be very much of a consumer person considering that he appears in advertisements, gives children Mars branded chocolate etc - perhaps he should be an employee of Tesco or WHSmith rather than the Church of England? He may represent the role as "postman" because of that - after all, what is religious about delivering parcels?

Another point is that in this country at least, Jewish and Muslim festivals are understandably not celebrated like that, although Hindus do a great Diwali celebration when it comes around each year. I know that there are still people and families who think of Christmas as a religious from the outset.

It's a bit more complicated than this.

At one end of the scale are Christians who do not celebrate Christmas - they are few in number but they do exist. Next are Christians who celebrate Christmas but don't do the commercial side of it or Father Christmas because they see it as an innovation not in the Bible. Father Christmas would have been unrecognised in Britain in 1800 as the custom appeared some time in the mid 19th century when kids would hang up a sock then find an orange inside it on Christmas morning. At the opposite end of the scale are staunch atheists who celebrate Christmas as one big decadent party and do the Father Christmas malarkey simply because it's fun or they see it as a national celebration rather than a religious celebration.

Did you know that the UK is one of a small number of countries that does not have a national day. Therefore Christmas probably substitutes it for millions of people who aren't religious.

staffslad
28-11-2018, 10:48
The Woolworth's Christmas advert was something eagerly anticipated and was an indication that the big day was fast approaching.

I think some of the bigger chains are now experiencing a similar effect to what small, independent shops went through several decades ago. Back then, there was a move away from shopping at individual shops like a butcher, baker etc, to doing much more of your purchases under a single roof, be that in a store like Tesco or an out of town mall. Consequently, many small high street shops suffered and were forced to close. Well, I think the same is happening again and has been gradually underway for a long time, but is accelerating. Online retailers are affecting purchases from stores in an increasingly adverse way. We have seen some well known casualties and there will be more. Those that can adapt have a good chance of surviving, probably with a smaller physical store footprint, but those that cannot will find difficult times ahead.

Arran
28-11-2018, 12:33
This is the first Christmas without Toys R Us since 1984.

George 1978
28-11-2018, 21:13
It's a bit more complicated than this.

At one end of the scale are Christians who do not celebrate Christmas - they are few in number but they do exist. Next are Christians who celebrate Christmas but don't do the commercial side of it or Father Christmas because they see it as an innovation not in the Bible. Father Christmas would have been unrecognised in Britain in 1800 as the custom appeared some time in the mid 19th century when kids would hang up a sock then find an orange inside it on Christmas morning. At the opposite end of the scale are staunch atheists who celebrate Christmas as one big decadent party and do the Father Christmas malarkey simply because it's fun or they see it as a national celebration rather than a religious celebration.

Did you know that the UK is one of a small number of countries that does not have a national day. Therefore Christmas probably substitutes it for millions of people who aren't religious.

Seems strange to think that they are Christians who don't celebrate Christmas - I would assume that one would most likely to be a non-Christian who would celebrate the event. There is also the Orthodox Christmas which is on 7th January, which was on that date due to the change from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar (or perhaps the other way round).

It just proves however that those people don't see it as a religious thing as a lot of people do, hence the relatively recent commercialism. I am certain that people (usually children) still hang up a sock each year and expect one or two things delivered inside it.

I do know that Great Britain does not have a national day, along with Denmark - I would like to see this country have its own day - perhaps 23rd April when it is St George's Day (although Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales would argue for their own national day as well). The Queen's Official Birthday (even though the actual date changed each year) could also be a candidate as well.

George 1978
28-11-2018, 21:19
It's nice that Tesco are reusing their "Everyone's Welcome" slogan from last year - when I saw the adverts on the TV and that slogan was used, I always think to myself: "yes, everyone's welcome at Tesco except shoplifters". ;)

tex
29-11-2018, 14:18
It's nice that Tesco are reusing their "Everyone's Welcome" slogan from last year - when I saw the adverts on the TV and that slogan was used, I always think to myself: "yes, everyone's welcome at Tesco except shoplifters". ;)

Interesting also to note that waitrose are now part of the John lewis group but they used there christmas ad to poo poo the Elton john ad?

George 1978
01-12-2018, 12:53
They should have called the advertising campaign Elton John Lewis.

All I can say now is that I have posted most of my Christmas cards (feeding the post boxes as I call it), although there will always be the odd person that I have forgotten.

tex
01-12-2018, 12:59
They should have called the advertising campaign Elton John Lewis.

All I can say now is that I have posted most of my Christmas cards (feeding the post boxes as I call it), although there will always be the odd person that I have forgotten.

Commendable George, i really must start writing my two cards soon!

George 1978
02-12-2018, 02:15
Commendable George, i really must start writing my two cards soon!

You do that, but don't leave it too late.

Final Posting Dates:

Tuesday 18th December 2018 - UK Second Class
Thursday 20th December 2018 - UK First Class

Tuesday 4th December 2018 - Africa and the Middle East
Monday 10th December 2018 - Australia and New Zealand
Friday 14th December 2018 - United States and Canada
Saturday 15th December 2018 - Sweden and Finland
Monday 17th December 2018 - Some mainland Europe countries
Tuesday 18th December 2018 - Ireland, France and Belgium (and I assume the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands as well).

https://www.royalmail.com/christmas/last-posting-dates/

I posted my international ones (two for the United States and one for Australia) over a week ago, giving them a head start for obvious reasons.

tex
02-12-2018, 11:38
George, your scaring me.

Zincubus
02-12-2018, 11:47
George, your scaring me.

He's fine ....

We are both Aspergers and as such experience life slightly differently to you normal folk :)


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tex
02-12-2018, 12:08
He's fine ....

We are both Aspergers and as such experience life slightly differently to you normal folk :)


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I know, just joshin

staffslad
02-12-2018, 12:12
My wife writes our Christmas cards. I'm not even sure how many she sends, but as people pass away and others use text/internet greetings, we receive fewer cards each year.

Zincubus
02-12-2018, 13:12
I know, just joshin

Ahhh

Apologies


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George 1978
02-12-2018, 13:29
George, your scaring me.

Why am I scaring you?I don't understand.

I have had to put up with enough prejudice in the past just for being different, and at a time like this, I can easily do without it.

Zincubus
02-12-2018, 14:00
Why am I scaring you?I don't understand.

I have had to put up with enough prejudice in the past just for being different, and at a time like this, I can easily do without it.

It's fine bud .. he was joking but forgot to add a [emoji4]


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George 1978
02-12-2018, 15:03
It's fine bud .. he was joking but forgot to add a [emoji4]


That's all very well, but sometimes it's difficult to know whether someone is being ironic, sarcastic, or whatever - and that has got nothing at all to do with having any sort of condition whatsoever- a lot of people respond in that same way. I just think that it is not very nice for someone to say that. I have to admit that no DYR remember has ever sacred me during my time on here, and I am someone who has rather poor social skills.

I would appreciate an apology from Tex for saying that - I will easily forgive him and move on if he apologies.

Zincubus
02-12-2018, 15:27
That's all very well, but sometimes it's difficult to know whether someone is being ironic, sarcastic, or whatever - and that has got nothing at all to do with having any sort of condition whatsoever- a lot of people respond in that same way. I just think that it is not very nice for someone to say that. I have to admit that no DYR remember has ever sacred me during my time on here, and I am someone who has rather poor social skills.

I would appreciate an apology from Tex for saying that - I will easily forgive him and move on if he apologies.

I don't think there's a need for him to apologise in this instance.. he's already explained that he meant no malice towards you and he was 'joshing' ( joking / jesting ) .

I also misunderstand many posts as I maybe did when I quoted him ..

No harm done bud .

Just forget it ..


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tex
02-12-2018, 18:02
That's all very well, but sometimes it's difficult to know whether someone is being ironic, sarcastic, or whatever - and that has got nothing at all to do with having any sort of condition whatsoever- a lot of people respond in that same way. I just think that it is not very nice for someone to say that. I have to admit that no DYR remember has ever sacred me during my time on here, and I am someone who has rather poor social skills.

I would appreciate an apology from Tex for saying that - I will easily forgive him and move on if he apologies.

Relax Bud, just a turn of phrase, your knowing all the final posting dates for christmas amused me. My sense of humour can be misunderstood sometimes and often goes over the head of people. Not trying to be a smart ***, i've already said in previous posts that i like reading your posts and that i would miss you if you stopped posting. I am a little disapointed however that you misjudge me as the kind of person that might want to cause upset, strange also that Zincubus has similar problems to yourself but read my comment with a different perspective.So no apology here fraid as that would be an admission of guilt and i wont apologise just to apease you.If you still feel you have been done a misjustice it might be simpler to give each other a wide berth as i would hate to cause you any further upset unwittingly.

Zincubus
02-12-2018, 22:54
I guess I did kinda misunderstand you initially but only because I didn't know if you knew about George's Aspergers ..

In hindsight it was a very funny / witty comment .. .. similar to to ones I write myself ... but I always add a smiley ..

It was all something over nothing fellas ... let's all forget it and move forwards !!




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George 1978
03-12-2018, 04:22
Relax Bud, just a turn of phrase, your knowing all the final posting dates for christmas amused me. My sense of humour can be misunderstood sometimes and often goes over the head of people. Not trying to be a smart ***, i've already said in previous posts that i like reading your posts and that i would miss you if you stopped posting. I am a little disapointed however that you misjudge me as the kind of person that might want to cause upset, strange also that Zincubus has similar problems to yourself but read my comment with a different perspective.So no apology here fraid as that would be an admission of guilt and i wont apologise just to apease you.If you still feel you have been done a misjustice it might be simpler to give each other a wide berth as i would hate to cause you any further upset unwittingly.

I just copied the dates from the Royal Mail website, so I don't know why you had mentioned that in response - to tell you the truth, I thought that what I posted was useful rather amusing.

I am disappointed that you didn't choose your words more wisely - I don't like the fact that someone who I hardly know says something like that about myself, now that is scary to someone like myself. You have to remember that members come in all shapes and sizes and I know that I don't know anyone personally enough to say things that could upset them - I don't know how sensitive you are for example, mostly because I don't pry into the private lives of people, but I wouldn't go up to a person walking down the street and say that they are scaring me - life doesn't work like that.

I shall regard your response as an apology as long as you remember to think about other people before you say something about them - it has got nothing to do with being guilty, it is just about being courteous. Just remember that although we are all different, some of us are a bit more different than others. Sometimes apologising is not about being guilty, but to make amends on something that has happened.

Usually any points I make on this forum, ironic or not, I get straight to the point and so most of the time I don't need to put a Smiley on, but sometimes I do. The difference between someone laughing with someone else and someone laughing at them can make a huge bit of difference, as to whether they are on the same side or whatever.

I do have the condition (I was diagnosed at the age of 18), and sometimes it's a good thing that people understand while at other times it can be a bad thing. I see it in a similar way to racism or sexism - no one deserves to be discriminated, harassed or distressed just because there happens to be something different about them. I just think that everyone should be treated equally at the end of the day.

I am prepared to forget it completely.

George 1978
03-12-2018, 04:26
I don't think there's a need for him to apologise in this instance.. he's already explained that he meant no malice towards you and he was 'joshing' ( joking / jesting ) .



Sometimes it is not as transparent as that - I know that even I have made a joke about something and the other person takes it too seriously or ignores the irony of it.

People are different at the end of the day, and can take things completely differently. Having said that, I am prepared to draw a line under this.

Zincubus
03-12-2018, 08:08
Sometimes it is not as transparent as that - I know that even I have made a joke about something and the other person takes it too seriously or ignores the irony of it.

People are different at the end of the day, and can take things completely differently. Having said that, I am prepared to draw a line under this.

Thing is George ... this forum is probably the safest , friendliest forum on the internet . I have had some very unpleasant experiences on other forums over the years .

When I saw his initial comment - due to my experience and experiences elsewhere I realised he was joking and it WAS a funny thing to say , ideal wording AND timing .

Then ... I wondered for a moment if he was unaware of your Aspergers and his comment wasn't a joke , that's when I posted .

What I'm trying to say is that it may be better for you to chose with great care ..which forums you visit in the future ..

Regards


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George 1978
03-12-2018, 12:10
That is one of the reasons why I joined here - when talking about our memories of the past, we talk from personal experience and as a result, no one can really argue about that, unless we talk about general memories that others might remember more clearly than ourselves - I don't mind being put right in that respect, especially if the other person happens to be a lot older and therefore remembers something a lot more clearer from the past.

The irony is that if it had been addressed to another person, I would have thought of it in a more humorous way, but as it was aimed at myself, I obviously took it a lot more seriously. When I was at school I worked hard in most subjects, but then again I thought that I would be a target for bullies as a result, and I suppose it is a bit like that - I thought of being a clone of the next person was the best way of fitting in - after all, I wore the same uniform during Years 7 to 11.

I think that the problem is that as a member of this forum I hardly know anyone personally for obvious reasons, and so any comment can be taken a bit "out of bounds" if you know what I mean. In the mid 2000s I was a member of Digital Spy and I left after nearly a year because I felt as if I was "drowning" within the community of the forums - I knew that I made a mistake joining up and that things were getting out of my depth. It's the same with those who leave Twitter and Facebook, and even I have taken long term leave from both as a result of various things that have happened.

Zincubus
03-12-2018, 14:01
That is one of the reasons why I joined here - when talking about our memories of the past, we talk from personal experience and as a result, no one can really argue about that, unless we talk about general memories that others might remember more clearly than ourselves - I don't mind being put right in that respect, especially if the other person happens to be a lot older and therefore remembers something a lot more clearer from the past.

The irony is that if it had been addressed to another person, I would have thought of it in a more humorous way, but as it was aimed at myself, I obviously took it a lot more seriously. When I was at school I worked hard in most subjects, but then again I thought that I would be a target for bullies as a result, and I suppose it is a bit like that - I thought of being a clone of the next person was the best way of fitting in - after all, I wore the same uniform during Years 7 to 11.

I think that the problem is that as a member of this forum I hardly know anyone personally for obvious reasons, and so any comment can be taken a bit "out of bounds" if you know what I mean. In the mid 2000s I was a member of Digital Spy and I left after nearly a year because I felt as if I was "drowning" within the community of the forums - I knew that I made a mistake joining up and that things were getting out of my depth. It's the same with those who leave Twitter and Facebook, and even I have taken long term leave from both as a result of various things that have happened.

We are sooooo similar :)

I am still with DigitalSpy as it's so varied and soooo busy and bustling. I have to be very , very careful in some sections though.. I've lost count of the short term bans I've had from defending my opinions in the very dangerous 'football' section !!

Do you use the rather fabulous free app called Tapatalk ?
It's specially/ specifically for people who peruse forums !!


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George 1978
03-12-2018, 14:52
I don't think I have ever used Tapatalk - to be honest, I am a stranger to my own mobile phone. I am very old-fashioned when it comes to technology.

I have joined probably 10 different forums over the past 15 years or so, and I am pleased to say that I have never been banned from any of them. On some, I only post around 25 times and then I go away and come back after a year or so, while others such as this one, I post over 1,000 times.

tex
03-12-2018, 14:55
I just copied the dates from the Royal Mail website, so I don't know why you had mentioned that in response - to tell you the truth, I thought that what I posted was useful rather amusing.

I am disappointed that you didn't choose your words more wisely - I don't like the fact that someone who I hardly know says something like that about myself, now that is scary to someone like myself. You have to remember that members come in all shapes and sizes and I know that I don't know anyone personally enough to say things that could upset them - I don't know how sensitive you are for example, mostly because I don't pry into the private lives of people, but I wouldn't go up to a person walking down the street and say that they are scaring me - life doesn't work like that.

I shall regard your response as an apology as long as you remember to think about other people before you say something about them - it has got nothing to do with being guilty, it is just about being courteous. Just remember that although we are all different, some of us are a bit more different than others. Sometimes apologising is not about being guilty, but to make amends on something that has happened.

Usually any points I make on this forum, ironic or not, I get straight to the point and so most of the time I don't need to put a Smiley on, but sometimes I do. The difference between someone laughing with someone else and someone laughing at them can make a huge bit of difference, as to whether they are on the same side or whatever.

I do have the condition (I was diagnosed at the age of 18), and sometimes it's a good thing that people understand while at other times it can be a bad thing. I see it in a similar way to racism or sexism - no one deserves to be discriminated, harassed or distressed just because there happens to be something different about them. I just think that everyone should be treated equally at the end of the day.

I am prepared to forget it completely.

You regard my response as an apology? but i already said i have nothing to apologise for so please dont. You also say you dont pry into peoples private lives but you are happy to spell out everything you have endured during your own lifetime. George i like you a lot but you do risk losing any empathy you may have if you persist with the character assasination you are bestowing on me.You have compared my words to those of a racist and at the same time confessed to sometimes misunderstanding the context of an innocent remark, now that's irony in its true sense.

George 1978
03-12-2018, 15:25
You regard my response as an apology? but i already said i have nothing to apologise for so please dont. You also say you dont pry into peoples private lives but you are happy to spell out everything you have endured during your own lifetime. George i like you a lot but you do risk losing any empathy you may have if you persist with the character assasination you are bestowing on me.You have compared my words to those of a racist and at the same time confessed to sometimes misunderstanding the context of an innocent remark, now that's irony in its true sense.

I try and respect people whoever they are, especially if they are those who I don't really know such as members of this forum. Fair enough, I am not very thick skinned when it comes to taking criticism, and I do get alarmed when someone aims some remark at myself - please note that it is not a personal remark to yourself, Tex, but it is referring to lots of people I have known from the past. I am almost certain that a lot people would react in the same way, not just myself. I probably overreacted as a result, but what I am saying is that I cannot imagine myself using those words against another DYR member.

Also, the objective of this forum is to talk about memories from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, and that can mean talking about ourselves in detail when it comes to what we remember - at least I don't pry into the affairs of other members as I know that would be out of bounds for myself as a member. I am certain that anyone on here would feel uncomfortable if I went too personal on them whatever the situation was.

I have been accused of racism many years ago when at school (I took the advice of a family member - a long story) and it wasn't nice, but the problem is that a lot of people these days are a lot more sensitive and can be offended by various things around them - the laws of the land have been more stricter and tightened up in recent years. Even I often think of things being "political correctness gone mad" when I hear or read about things in the news. Things do blow out of proportion, and people do literally take things the wrong way.

People such as myself often take things too literally, and sometimes it can look alarming at first glance - as I said before, if the remark was addressed to someone else I wouldn't think much of it, and perhaps I would even get the irony of what was being said. I probably overreacted for a good reason, but others might have took it differently, perhaps more positively. I do find it very easy to be uncomfortable about what people say - OK, it is my problem and I have to live with it, but as I said before, everyone is different. I took the remark the wrong way, fair enough but I am sure that you understand the reason why.

Now, as we are nearly in the season of wrapping things up (and as a way of getting back on topic in this thread), I think that we should wrap this up once and for all, and get on with being members of this forum. Life is far too short for quarrelling.

tex
03-12-2018, 15:30
As long as you admit i was right....JUST KIDDIN! (Honestly)

George 1978
03-12-2018, 15:44
As long as you admit i was right....JUST KIDDIN! (Honestly)

There are no right or wrong answers.

I think we should both take a deep breath and count to ten.

Zincubus
03-12-2018, 19:28
As long as you admit i was right....JUST KIDDIN! (Honestly)

I actually expected you to say something like that .. to diffuse the situation :)

The only thing I can suggest to anyone and everyone making jokes or generally messing around is to add a smiley [emoji4] on at the end !?!!

:)


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Zincubus
03-12-2018, 19:29
There are no right or wrong answers.

I think we should both take a deep breath and count to ten.



Count to ten !?!

Time is money :)


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HG
03-12-2018, 21:27
Glad that's sorted, can you take any further discussion not related to Christmas to pm, thank you ��

Donald the Great
04-12-2018, 01:10
Tex and George. Life is too short for petty squabbles. Let's get back to this being the friendliest forum on the web.

Donald the Great
04-12-2018, 01:12
So who puts out Chrissie lites and even still lites up their Chrissie tree?

Do you prefer artificial Chrissie trees or the real thing.

Who still puts their presents under the Chrissie tree?

George 1978
04-12-2018, 02:15
I actually expected you to say something like that .. to diffuse the situation :)

The only thing I can suggest to anyone and everyone making jokes or generally messing around is to add a smiley [emoji4] on at the end !?!!

:)




I think that it often helps.

George 1978
04-12-2018, 02:16
Glad that's sorted, can you take any further discussion not related to Christmas to pm, thank you ��

Fine by me.

George 1978
04-12-2018, 02:17
Tex and George. Life is too short for petty squabbles. Let's get back to this being the friendliest forum on the web.

I prefer being part of a friendly forum.

George 1978
04-12-2018, 02:25
So who puts out Chrissie lites and even still lites up their Chrissie tree?

Do you prefer artificial Chrissie trees or the real thing.

Who still puts their presents under the Chrissie tree?

I don't think that my small flat would accommodate a real tree - I have always had the same plastic one for years now.

Now, this is my idea of a "Chrissie" tree:


https://forums.doyouremember.co.uk/attachment.php?attachmentid=5941&stc=1

She would look better than any angel or fairy at the top...

George 1978
04-12-2018, 02:29
Count to ten !?!

Time is money :)




It certainly is when it comes to the expenses in the run up to Christmas. :)

Zincubus
04-12-2018, 03:41
I don't think that my small flat would accommodate a real tree - I have always had the same plastic one for years now.

Now, this is my idea of a "Chrissie" tree:


https://forums.doyouremember.co.uk/attachment.php?attachmentid=5941&stc=1

She would look better than any angel or fairy at the top...

I have no idea who that is .. my guess is someone off Cell Block H simply looking at the photo .

Incidentally is zzzzzChrissie one of 'your' tags ??


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George 1978
04-12-2018, 06:36
I have no idea who that is .. my guess is someone off Cell Block H simply looking at the photo .

Incidentally is zzzzzChrissie one of 'your' tags ??



She was a PCBH character called Chrissie Latham (nine minutes into episode 188) - I thought people would get the joke as Donald referred to Christmas as "Chrissie". I assume that you have never seen PCBH? Donald is in Australia and so he would be familiar with it as well.

By the way, episodes 74 to 79 of PCBH are Christmas themed.

The images I have are stored alphabetically and I can access the ones at the end of the alphabet more quickly than those at the beginning, hence it starting with Zs.

Zincubus
04-12-2018, 09:21
She was a PCBH character called Chrissie Latham (nine minutes into episode 188) - I thought people would get the joke as Donald referred to Christmas as "Chrissie". I assume that you have never seen PCBH? Donald is in Australia and so he would be familiar with it as well.

By the way, episodes 74 to 79 of PCBH are Christmas themed.

The images I have are stored alphabetically and I can access the ones at the end of the alphabet more quickly than those at the beginning, hence it starting with Zs.

Ahhhh ... oddly enough I store some of my contacts / mp3s etc with zzz's in front of the title as well for a similar reason .I've never ever seen it elsewhere until I saw your image .

Similar minds clearly have similar thought processes !?!?


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George 1978
04-12-2018, 12:04
Ahhhh ... oddly enough I store some of my contacts / mp3s etc with zzz's in front of the title as well for a similar reason .I've never ever seen it elsewhere until I saw your image .

Similar minds clearly have similar thought processes !?!?




It's a bit like how classified advertisements in newspapers and telephone directories start with AAAAAAAA because they want their company to be the first alphabetically.

My concept is probably similar to how ZZ Top got its name...

tex
04-12-2018, 12:25
I actually expected you to say something like that .. to diffuse the situation :)

The only thing I can suggest to anyone and everyone making jokes or generally messing around is to add a smiley [emoji4] on at the end !?!!

:)


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wouldn't know how https://forums.doyouremember.co.uk/images/icons/icon7.png

Zincubus
04-12-2018, 13:23
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20181204/79de44c216aa7a7439a4b0814682c472.jpeg


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tex
04-12-2018, 19:08
Smile for the camera!

Donald the Great
05-12-2018, 02:52
Guys we have gone off topic. About my three Chrissie questions?

George 1978
05-12-2018, 10:38
So who puts out Chrissie lites and even still lites up their Chrissie tree?

Do you prefer artificial Chrissie trees or the real thing.

Who still puts their presents under the Chrissie tree?

1) I keep the lights on the Christmas tree when I store it away for 11 months of the year, so the answer is yes to that one.

2) Artificial trees as I have had the same one for over a decade (and my parents had the same one for over 20 years).

3) There isn't too much room underneath, especially with the size of the presents, but I do try and keep them as closest as I can under the tree.

Jemima
05-12-2018, 11:54
Guys we have gone off topic. About my three Chrissie questions?


Good question Donald :)...

LIGHTS - I do love the these at Christmas as I feel they create a 'light' in the darkness of winter and add a bit of magic. I like lots of them on my tree, I enjoy the fun and nostalgia of coloured lights but love the elegance and beauty of warm white lights. The lights always go on the tree but I sometimes add others around the house if the fancy takes me, perhaps on a ledge or around the stair bannister, also a few little ones outside sometimes.

TREE - I prefer a real tree for the fragrance, the naturalness and the nostalgia, but appreciate an artificial one for not dropping needles, not needing water and also being easier to decorate. I do enjoy both and decide each Christmas which to have that year.

PRESENTS - These go under the tree as soon as they are wrapped (with some taking longer than others to make it there), but I do like to see them sat there under the twinkling lights

Arran
05-12-2018, 12:54
I install my lights on 30 November and leave them up until the end of January. They are just decorative lights, not Christmas lights.