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  • #31
    Re: Childhood books

    PRETTY SURE I READ THIS ONE.

    IVE MEMORIES OF READING ABOUT ABOUT FOXES BACK IN THE EIGHTIES AND IM NEAR SURE ITS THIS ONE.

    FOR THE HONOUR OF GRAYSKULL

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    • #32
      Re: Childhood books

      I read a very good story at primary school. It was about a group of kids that hide on a seaside pier until after dark, when after it closes for the night, they start playing on the rides and games. If I can remember, a storm starts to batter the pier and part of it collapses into the sea. The kids have no way of getting back to the shore or calling for help and somehow, a fire breaks out. It's a story that's been stuck in mind ever since. Any ideas?

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      • #33
        Re: Childhood books

        The Famous five red hard cover books in school,then in WH Smiths you could buy the soft cover versions,which I had a good collection of

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        • #34
          Re: Childhood books

          when i was at primary school, they had a copy of goalkeepers revenge by bill naughton. really enjoyed that book. also, from a kestrel to a knave by barry hines.

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          • #35
            Re: Childhood books

            I remember trying to find the rude bits in books in our library...
            Time flies like the wind, fruit flies like bananas - go figure!

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            • #36
              Re: Childhood books

              Originally posted by zabadak View Post
              I remember trying to find the rude bits in books in our library...
              When you were a naughty boy

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              • #37
                Re: Childhood books

                Originally posted by amethyst View Post
                When you were a naughty boy
                "Were"?
                Time flies like the wind, fruit flies like bananas - go figure!

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                • #38
                  Re: Childhood books



                  I must have read this 50 times
                  Attached Files

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                  • #39
                    Re: Childhood books

                    I remember my parents buying me the pop up books, i loved then, the stories came alive with a pop up book.

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                    • #40
                      Re: Childhood books

                      Originally posted by darren View Post
                      PRETTY SURE I READ THIS ONE.

                      IVE MEMORIES OF READING ABOUT ABOUT FOXES BACK IN THE EIGHTIES AND IM NEAR SURE ITS THIS ONE.

                      There was someone at our school called Mr Fox and the kids used to say that it was about him.
                      Telling it almost exactly like it was so many years later - and proud of doing so!

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                      • #41
                        Re: Childhood books

                        Originally posted by ericthecavalier View Post


                        I must have read this 50 times
                        I am sure there was a song which complimented the book or the character at least.
                        Telling it almost exactly like it was so many years later - and proud of doing so!

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                        • #42
                          Re: Childhood books

                          I used to read books about Orlando the cat. I remember liking them.

                          Attached Files
                          Time flies like the wind, fruit flies like bananas - go figure!

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                          • #43
                            Re: Childhood books

                            Amazing that programmes like Words and Pictures were almost like "product placement" for children's books - I know that Pat Hutchins, Shirley Huighes and David McKee's books used to feature on there regularly.

                            One cannot beat Hughes' Dogger which was a lovely tale of a young boy almost losing his soft toy dog to his sister via a jumble sale - a copy of it was always in the classroom book corner at Infant School.
                            Telling it almost exactly like it was so many years later - and proud of doing so!

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