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Christmas fayre

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  • Christmas fayre

    Walking around Morrissons today i couldn't help wondering why supermarkets start selling perishable fresh foods which are intended for the christmas period so early, the shelves were heaving with food which is past its sell by date well in advance of christmas. They were even selling fresh turkeys at 25 each which were out of date one week into december?
    Ejector seat?...your jokin!

  • #2
    Re: Christmas fayre

    I have mentioned it before on here regarding sell by dates of traditional Christmas food - a local Sainsbury's was selling mince pies in October which had a November sell-by date. At least my advent calendar has a best-before date of 31st March 2020 on it.

    They must be big turkeys if they cost 25 - they probably have B Matthews, Esq on them.
    Telling it almost exactly like it was so many years later - and proud of doing so!

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    • #3
      Re: Christmas fayre

      Maybe the turkeys were for freezing.
      The Trickster On The Roof

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      • #4
        Re: Christmas fayre

        Indeed - freezing food obviously extends the life of the item. Quite often I go along with the date on them as it assumes that one is to refrigerate rather than freeze them.
        Telling it almost exactly like it was so many years later - and proud of doing so!

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        • #5
          Re: Christmas fayre

          Is it a fact for the consumer to buy more products try them first oh those mince pies were delicious,have to by 2 boxes next timetime don't think xmas puddings are the same they probably have 6 month date on them

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          • #6
            Re: Christmas fayre

            Originally posted by Richard1978 View Post
            Maybe the turkeys were for freezing.
            In which case buy a frozen turkey for half the price
            Ejector seat?...your jokin!

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            • #7
              Re: Christmas fayre

              Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
              I have mentioned it before on here regarding sell by dates of traditional Christmas food - a local Sainsbury's was selling mince pies in October which had a November sell-by date. At least my advent calendar has a best-before date of 31st March 2020 on it.

              They must be big turkeys if they cost 25 - they probably have B Matthews, Esq on them.
              Although mince pies are indeed traditionally a christmas treat i think most people who like them are happy to see them on the shelves early
              Ejector seat?...your jokin!

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              • #8
                Re: Christmas fayre

                Originally posted by tex View Post
                Although mince pies are indeed traditionally a christmas treat i think most people who like them are happy to see them on the shelves early
                I can imagine a Christmas party in which mince pies over a month after their sell-by date are served - no wonder that food poisoning incidents peak at Christmas time.
                Telling it almost exactly like it was so many years later - and proud of doing so!

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                • #9
                  Re: Christmas fayre

                  There are also the Christmas parties at schools where parents make jellies, cakes and the like.
                  Telling it almost exactly like it was so many years later - and proud of doing so!

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