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Thread: Terry scott

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Terry scott

    Terry scott was born on the 4th of may in watford hertfordshire in 1927.
    he died july 26th 1994.



    he was in the following carry on films.


    carry on camping

    carry on at your convenience

    carry on matron

    carry on henry

    carry on loving

    carry on sargeant

    carry on up the khyber

    carry on up the jungle



    he was in happy ever after as terry fletcher.

    and in terry and june as terry medford

    he was also the voice of penfold and leatherhead from dangermouse.

    he was in the tv film mother goose as mother goose from 1965.


    Last edited by darren; 20-08-2012 at 13:14.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Terry scott

    Yeah,i remember him.Coukd possibly be yet another rellative

    Rest in peace ,Terry

  3. #3
    sf1378 Guest

    Default Re: Terry scott

    Quote Originally Posted by stud1al View Post
    Yeah,i remember him.Coukd possibly be yet another rellative

    Rest in peace ,Terry
    Sorry, but thats making me laugh, thats the second time you've said this its a bit like saying all the Smiths of England are related...lol

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Terry scott

    They may very well be from way back

  5. #5
    jrt2345 Guest

    Default Re: Terry scott

    He was great in T & J. Very silly and his jokes always make me laugh.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Terry scott

    Quote Originally Posted by sf1378 View Post
    Sorry, but thats making me laugh, thats the second time you've said this its a bit like saying all the Smiths of England are related...lol

    Perhaps the most outstanding, and numerous, of the great Scottish Border Families was that of Scott.
    Uchtred, son of Scot, lived in the first half of the 12th century, and from his two sons the numerous Scott branches began. The Scotts of BUCCLEUCH, whose Dukedom dates from 1673, ended in Anne, who married James, Duke of Monmouth, natural son of Charles II, who was beheaded for rebelling against his uncle, James II. From this marriage comes the line of the later Dukes of Buccleuch and Queensberry.
    From the line of Harden originating in the 14th century, sprang one of Scotland's greatest men: Sir Walter Scott of Abbotsford.
    Like their neighbours, the Scotts were turbulent, cunning, courageous and filled with energy. The gathering place of the Families in time of war was Bellendean, on Borthwick Water. When the fierce cry of 'A Bellendaine!' was heard on the Border, men knew that the Scotts were 'out'.
    Much of the following information is taken from Anderson's book, Vol. 1, p.448, which he introduces thusly: "There is (1871) in the possession of the present Lord Polwarth, who is himself a noble branch of the Scotts, a genealogical table, prepared by and holograph of Sir Walter Scott, of Abbotsford, Bart., in which he traces the origin and descent of this family..."
    On p. 451, in speaking of one Sir Walter Scott who declared his support of James VI in 1567, Anderson continues,"He attained considerable renown as a military commander under Maurice Prince of Ornage, and was, for his services and military merit, raised to the peerage of Scotland, 16th March 1606, under the title of Lord Scott of BUCCLEUCH.
    "The locality of the title is in one of the minor vales of Selkirkshire, and tradition attributes its origin to a recess, or in modern (1871) Scotch, a cleugh therein. A tradition preserved by Scott of Satchells in his 'True History of the Right Honourable name of Scott,' published in 1688, and quoted by Sir Walter Scott in the notes to 'The Lay of The Last Mistrel,' gives the following romantic origine of the name of BUCCLEUCH:'Two brothers, natives of Galloway, banished for a riot or insurrection, came to Rankelburn in Ettrick Forest, where the keeper received them joyfully on account of their skill in the mysteries of thee chase. Kenneth MacAlpin, king of Scotland came soon after to hunt in the royal forest, and pursued a buck from Ettrickheuch to the glen now called Buckleuch, about two miles above the junction of Rankelburn with the river Ettrick. Here the stag stood at bay; and the king and his attendants, who followed on horseback, were thrown out by the steepness of the hill and the morass. John, of the brethren from Galloway, had followed the chase on foot; and now coming in, seized the buck by the horns, and, being a man of great strength and activity, threw him on his back, and ran with this burden about a mile up a steep hill, to a place called Cracra-cross, where Kenneth had halted, and laid the buck at the sovereign's feet, who said,

    'And for the buck thou stoutly brought
    To us up that steep heuch,
    'Thy designation ever shall
    Be John Scott in Buckscleuch.'"
    Our venerable, possible kinsman, Sir Walter Scott, made many references to the Buccleuchs in his works. In "The Lay of The Last Minstrel," Canto VI, division VIII, describing a wedding feast, he wrote,

    "Such day of mirth ne'er cheered their clan,
    Since old Buccleuch the name did gain,
    When in the cleuch the buck was ta'en."
    My favorite theory about the arrival of the Scotts of Buccleuch in Americas is from the work of Gerry Green, "Mary's People--The Buckelews," in which she says, "Unfortunately, I don't have the slightest idea where this version originated. Some notes in my files state, 'The American Buckelews are descended from a Scottish Border clan, the Scotts, Barons of Buccleuch (bu kloo). Two brothers, Francis and Gilbert Scott of the clan of Buccleuch, came to America on the ship Caledonia about 1664. They dropped the sirname (sic) Scott and kept the clan name, changing the spelling to Bucklew.' The notation goes on to say they settled in New Jersey. ...it was not at all unusual for people to adopt place names for their surnames..." So, here you are, my cousin Scotts, "A BELLENDAINE!!"

  7. #7
    sf1378 Guest

    Default Re: Terry scott

    Yes, quite. I must be related to all the Sri Lankan's with my parents surnames then eh...

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Terry scott

    You may be,yes from way back but you just read the origins of the name Scott.

    "Uchtred, son of Scot, lived in the first half of the 12th century, and from his two sons the numerous Scott branches began"
    I suggest you take it up with the se people if you think you know better.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Terry scott

    I Still Miss Terry Scott loved him the carry on camping and loved terry and june
    1997


    Best Years Of My Childhood Was Growing Up In The Late 90's and the early 2000's . before the world went Mad

  10. #10

    Default Re: Terry scott

    I quite liked him in the Carry Ons, but found him a pain in the **** in anything else.

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