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Thread: Margarine

  1. #11
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    Jan 2017
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    Default Re: Margarine

    The last margarines to contain animal fat would be the hard block types used in cooking and baking, which is not acceptable in the 2000s. There are not many refiners and dealers of animal fat left in the UK, and those that do still exist have diversified into other areas. Most fish and chip shops still fry in beef dripping and it has some uses in cooking and baking, other than that it has largely been eliminated from our diet.

  2. #12
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    Jul 2015
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    Default Re: Margarine

    So that's what happened to Krona...

    I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter in ‘brick’ launch

    By Marketing Week 23 Aug 1996

    Van den Bergh Foods is to launch I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter in a brick shape – like butter packets – in a move that could spell the end of the company’s block margarine, Krona.

    I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter will continue to be sold in tubs, like its main rival, St Ivel’s Utterly Butterly. The alternative shape will position the brand firmly against butter brands such as Anchor and will also put the St Ivel brick-shaped spread Willow under pressure.

    Krona has a tiny share of the market, despite making a huge impact when it was launched in the UK in 1978. It was hailed as the first margarine with a buttery taste. Advertising for the brand has been dormant for two years.

    An industry insider says: “This is a clever ploy by Van den Bergh to give a margarine brand a butter-like shape and get more space on the shelf.”

    Disposing of under-performing brands is seen as a top priority for Unilever, which is undergoing a far-reaching restructure into regional operating units.

    No one at Unilever was available for comment.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Margarine

    According to The Grocer, St. Ivel Gold was discontinued by Dairy Crest in 2008 as a result of the 'evolving tastes' of consumers, i.e. they were not buying it because they did not like the taste. Delight was a Van den Berghs/Unilever brand and must have been dropped ~2000 as the range was relaunched in 1997 with a major advertising campaign. Obviously it did not work!

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Margarine

    Quote Originally Posted by darren View Post
    We always had this in the early 1970's, brings back good memories of a poorer but happier time.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Margarine

    It's noteworthy that Stork has repositioned itself in the market as more of a baking or cake making ingredient rather than a spreading margarine.

    In the 1970s to the 1990s Stork was perceived as a cheap and low-end margarine whereas people with good taste used Flora or a buttery spread if they weren't using butter.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Margarine

    Quote Originally Posted by Arran View Post
    It's noteworthy that Stork has repositioned itself in the market as more of a baking or cake making ingredient rather than a spreading margarine.

    In the 1970s to the 1990s Stork was perceived as a cheap and low-end margarine whereas people with good taste used Flora or a buttery spread if they weren't using butter.
    I can remember the cheesy 'taste test' Stork adverts with Leslie Crowther when I was a kid - this would be the late 1970s. Once the expensive polyunsatuarated and buttery spreads took off in the 1980s the likes of Stork and Blue Band would see their share of the market shrink rapidly so I suppose the brands had to be repositioned.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Margarine

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPsSzLnXJkg

    Alice can't believe it's not butter lol

    Do you really believe the other side without provocation would launch so many ICBM's, subs and ships knowing that we would have no option to launch as well? It would break our MAD Treaty (Mutually Assured Destruction) not to mention the end of the world as we know it. We would annihilate each other

  8. #18
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    Jul 2015
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    Default Re: Margarine

    Quote Originally Posted by CrystalBall View Post
    I can remember the cheesy 'taste test' Stork adverts with Leslie Crowther when I was a kid - this would be the late 1970s. Once the expensive polyunsatuarated and buttery spreads took off in the 1980s the likes of Stork and Blue Band would see their share of the market shrink rapidly so I suppose the brands had to be repositioned.
    I'm sure that Stork has been reformulated and is not the same stuff as it was in bygone decades. Can anybody find me old packaging for both the soft and hard Stork with a legible ingredient list?

    Flora has been reformulated and the original product from the 1980s contained hydrogenated oils.

    Blue Band is still available but not in Britain.

    https://www.unilever.com/brands/our-...band-rama.html

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Margarine

    Quote Originally Posted by Arran View Post
    I'm sure that Stork has been reformulated and is not the same stuff as it was in bygone decades. Can anybody find me old packaging for both the soft and hard Stork with a legible ingredient list?

    Flora has been reformulated and the original product from the 1980s contained hydrogenated oils.

    Blue Band is still available but not in Britain.

    https://www.unilever.com/brands/our-...band-rama.html


    I expect they have all been reformulated several times over the years. There was an improved version of soft Stork in tubs called Stork SB, I seem to remember. Special Blend? Soft Blend? Stork Buttery? Who knows?

  10. #20

    Default Re: Margarine

    Krona silver was not too bad, we had a little dish we would put the fresh block in to but if you wanted a sandwich you had to take it out the fridge about an hour before making your sandwich.

    Is Stork still about? My sister hates butter so for years she would have a tub of that nasty Stork in her fridge. She only buys brown bread too so for breakfast it was brown toast with Stork. Stork toast was only slightly preferable to dry toast.

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