Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Assemblies

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stockport
    Posts
    5,105

    Default Re: Assemblies

    I remember the teacher who could play the piano best at my primary left & the next best was never as good, but a few teacher who started soon after was a good as the first.

    At another school one of the teachers used to play a tape of hymns when no-one was available to play the piano.

    At both schools we occasionally had music played as came in & out, sometimes I would try to dance & sing along & get told off!
    The Trickster On The Roof

  2. #12

    Default Re: Assemblies

    I went to a CofE junior school, where assemblies would often be taken by a vicar. It was actually pretty good - less about god, more about interesting moral dilemmas. He was a pretty good vicar - a part-time cartoonist apparently; there was once a TV news segment/documentary (I can't recall which) about his efforts in getting a cartoon published in one of the dailies.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    755

    Default Re: Assemblies

    A friend attended a religious primary school that held communion services in assembly with bread and wine. The head teacher would fill a silver cup with Ribena then take a swig of it before offering it round to all the kids. If you were one of the last kids to be offered a sip it was more spit than Ribena. One day the friend poured caustic soda into the Ribena bottle. The head teacher in assembly said "Blood of Christ" before taking a swig then spat it out and dropped the cup. None of the kids knew what had happened when the head teacher was choking and spitting on the stage before other teachers got up to help her. She was off sick from school for the rest of the week due to chemical burns to her mouth and lips. During the week the vicar came in to hold assembly where he gave a stern lecture about sin making reference to the caustic soda in the Ribena and how God has seen the kid who put it in who had not owned up yet. The friend never owned up to doing it.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Christchurch uk
    Posts
    2,248

    Default Re: Assemblies

    As for school assemblies: I appreciate it's a school community thing. Obviously for the headmaster/principle to tell the school's pupils about coming up school events. Fair enough

    But the religious issue? I refused to attend school assemblies. I wasn't the only one

    So us 'refusing to attend school assemblies' group, we were often called into the headmasters room to be chastised for not attending

    Our response?

    Not actually "F*** off" but words to that effect.

    We stood up for our non-belief of religion

    The headmaster had no response to that & just left it there in the ether

    Do you really believe the other side without provocation would launch so many ICBM's, subs and ships knowing that we would have no option to launch as well? It would break our MAD Treaty (Mutually Assured Destruction) not to mention the end of the world as we know it.


  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,027

    Default Re: Assemblies

    Par Primary - mosdt of ours was rubbish, especially at both my Secondarys!

    The later encomposed probably notices/warnings about where to not venture (just off the Playgrounds) as they did at Primary, which included an RE element too!

    A lot of time the Secondary's included other warnings too - like Uniform in-particular especially!! Another from Primary (or theme clinked) was Harvest Festivals and the like (which is religously linked) and that we'd all have a chance to go this Sheltered Complex for Reired people - which was either in 4th or 5th Year (Year 5 or 6) at Primary - but far from it did we all have a chance what-soever!!


    80sChav

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northumberland
    Posts
    2,202

    Default Re: Assemblies

    In primary school we had assemblies every morning plus an afternoon assembly on Fridays before home time. I can't remember much about them, except we had teachers who played piano and each day we'd sing a couple of hymns out of 'Come and Praise'. Once a week anyone with a birthday that week would go up on stage and the school would drone a birthday greeting chant. On Thursdays we sometimes listened to the live BBC radio for schools broadcast on a big square block radio.

    In the Friday assembly one class would do a play maybe once a term. Each week someone had to go on stage and read out 'The Blessing' I remember it to this day..."May the Lord lead us where we go, keep us when we sleep, and talk to us when we awake, and may the peace of God, which passes all understanding, keep our hearts and minds in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen." Somehow my turn got missed for which I was eternally grateful! One class would also win the attendance cup for the week. There was an actual little battered old trophy cup that would be presented and placed in the classroom along with the 'prize' of an extra five minutes of play time at break.
    1976 Vintage

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stockport
    Posts
    5,105

    Default Re: Assemblies

    I remember one boy at my primary school was allowed to miss assemblies because he was a Jehovah's Witness. He used to be nicknamed the Oxfam Prince because supposedly he parents used to buy all their clothes from charity shops.
    The Trickster On The Roof

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    2,241

    Default Re: Assemblies

    Quote Originally Posted by Arran View Post
    What? None of the teachers could play the piano!

    There was a time when the ability to play the piano was a great advantage when applying to become a primary school teacher.

    Some primary schools even had kids playing the piano in assembly because none of the teachers could or they weren't in that day.
    I know that the Headteacher could play the piano, and she did it on days when the professional pianist wasn't there. I doubt that the other teachers could - I don't think that it was a rule within their qualifications to be able to play the piano.

    At Comprehensive School, the Music teacher (for obvious reasons), and the Drama teacher (as he had an upright piano in his room) were two teachers who could play the piano - the music teacher played the piano for the assembly.
    I am now in my 40s (just in case anyone asks).

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    2,241

    Default Re: Assemblies

    Also at Comprehensive School, we all sat in rows of chairs facing the Headteacher, Deputy Head or Year Head either on a lectern or on the stage. Better than sitting on the cold, dirty floor at the Infants and Juniors.

    Some of us (not me however) used to bring packed lunches to school in a container. We were listing to the Boss or whoever waffling on at the front, and we heard this noise. There was laughter in our row as they thought that someone had broke wind, but it was someone's crisps that went "pop" due to the airtight packet that it was in. A female teacher, obviously embarrassed said "boys!" to those who were laughing about it.
    I am now in my 40s (just in case anyone asks).

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Rhondda Valley
    Posts
    534

    Default Re: Assemblies

    Although I was never keen on assemblies, they didn't really bother me. I haven't got much recollection of assemblies in infant and primary (junior) school, I've got memories of them in comprehensive school.

    We would stand in lines in the first year, girls in front of boys for each class you were in. The first line was class 1/1, the second was 1/2 and so on until 1/8. This continued into the fourth year. In the fifth year, girls would stand on one side of the hall, boys on the other side.

    In the first year, I remember several children fainting, mostly girls. I remember one girl fainting directly behind me. She fell backwards hitting the floor with an almighty thud. She immediately came around and tried to get up. She must have been dazed badly. Trying to get back on her feet she again fell backwards, her skirt had rode up almost around her thighs. One memorable day.

    The fifth year assemblies were the most memorable. Herr Phipps, sorry Mr Phipps, the year head would come around inspecting us with his clipboard and pen. There would be several pages with names on going back two or more weeks. He would also listen to make sure everybody was singing. All he needed was a pair of jackboots, a black uniform with a skull and crossbones badge on a peaked cap, he would have been a fine example of a Waffen-SS senior officer.

    Another memorable assembly, again in the fifth year. The list of kids in for detention that evening was being read out. Approximately one third of the entire fifth year. My name was eventually read out. In the corner of my eye I noticed Herr Phipps coming towards me. He came right next to me, then growled, "That's you, nobody else!" It made little difference.....I still didn't turn up. The following day, my name and several other names were called out to remain after assembly. Another detention soon followed.

    There is one assembly in the forth year I wish I could have a time machine to go back to. Paying attention to the front, my friend standing next to me suddenly whispered in my ear, " I think Michelle Williams fancies you. She's been staring at you all through assembly." I looked in her direction, sure enough she was looking at me. There was nothing more at that time I could do. We were even in different classes. The sad part was, I was now going through a very bad time in school and had lost a lot of my confidence. I think that was the only assembly I really liked.
    Who cared about rules when you were young?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •