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Thread: Watching schools programmes at home

  1. #1
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    Default Watching schools programmes at home

    It is ironic that I actually saw a lot more schools programmes on the television while I was at home then at school (and I am certain that this applies to others as well). It is connected to school days of course, although it is connected to television as well, but mostly school days...

    Picture this: I become unwell during Sunday night which meant I was unable to go to school on Monday morning. I suppose that as I hated school, there would have been a sign of relief at this prospect, and as a result, it made being ill worthwhile in many ways. Sometimes the bowl and the broadsheet newspaper sheets spread across the floor at the side of the bed indicated how ill I really was, and that I wasn't playing truant just to get off school.

    In the days, long before Jeremy Kyle and This Morning, I could almost remember being ill and staying in bed for the first time since starting school, and having the black and white portable television set in the bedroom. I knew that I did not want to miss out on my education, so I had the schools programmes on. As soon as TV-am's After Nine finished, Monday mornings meant Picture Box with Alan Rothwell first thing (never saw it at school even when I was actually there), and later on, Chris Tarrant narrated an edition of Stop, Look, Listen which was more tailored to my age group as a six year old.

    What wasn't tailored for my age because it was a lot older for me was the Granada series Experiment with Jack Smith narrating physics or chemistry experiments inside a lab, and I was thinking "what?" at watching something that was too old for myself - for a region that didn't want to schedule schools programmes in its region back in the late 1950s, Granada's programmes seem more professional in a sub-Open University sort of way.

    We watched Words and Pictures in the afternoon at school when Vicky Ireland was presenting, and so I always tuned into that as well. And You and Me as well. Mind you, I used to watch the post-News at One films on ITV as well if there were no other school programmes on the other side.

    I had come to the conclusion that home education was an agreeable thing, and I often wished that my own parents were rich enough and academic enough for me to allow me to opt out of the system and be home educated that way, but it never was. I found studying at my Central Library a lot more easier to learn about what I want to find out about then being in the same room with 29 other unruly kids. Mind you, I was an isolated person back then - I still am, come to that.

    Did anyone used to watch schools programmes when off school ill, mostly in lieu of going to school itself?
    I am now in my 40s (just in case anyone asks).

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    Picturebox is a programme I recall watching at home, but it use to played at school on occasions.
    It may just be me, but the beginning of the programme use to scare me a little. I found it quite eerie.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    BBC's Scene schools drama series was the one for me

    One of the drama's I remember are:

    The Hunt Saboteurs about animal rights campaigners starring Lisa Coleman of Casualty fame

    Do you really believe the other side without provocation would launch so many ICBM's, subs and ships knowing that we would have no option to launch as well? It would break our MAD Treaty (Mutually Assured Destruction) not to mention the end of the world as we know it.


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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    I used to watch "The messengers", a schools prog on itv, seems so long ago now when both channels showed progs for schools in the mornings then early afternoon.i think the bbc ran "the electric company" in the afternoons as well.Our first prog would be "romper room" with miss Rosalyn at 4.30 pm on Anglia.
    Amazingly the first run of "The prisoner" in Wales was at 3.25pm on htv in the week when nothing was on the other itv stations.
    There was always of feeling of naughtiness about watching tv in the daytime.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    Quote Originally Posted by George 1978 View Post
    It is ironic that I actually saw a lot more schools programmes on the television while I was at home then at school (and I am certain that this applies to others as well). It is connected to school days of course, although it is connected to television as well, but mostly school days...

    Picture this: I become unwell during Sunday night which meant I was unable to go to school on Monday morning. I suppose that as I hated school, there would have been a sign of relief at this prospect, and as a result, it made being ill worthwhile in many ways. Sometimes the bowl and the broadsheet newspaper sheets spread across the floor at the side of the bed indicated how ill I really was, and that I wasn't playing truant just to get off school.

    In the days, long before Jeremy Kyle and This Morning, I could almost remember being ill and staying in bed for the first time since starting school, and having the black and white portable television set in the bedroom. I knew that I did not want to miss out on my education, so I had the schools programmes on. As soon as TV-am's After Nine finished, Monday mornings meant Picture Box with Alan Rothwell first thing (never saw it at school even when I was actually there), and later on, Chris Tarrant narrated an edition of Stop, Look, Listen which was more tailored to my age group as a six year old.

    What wasn't tailored for my age because it was a lot older for me was the Granada series Experiment with Jack Smith narrating physics or chemistry experiments inside a lab, and I was thinking "what?" at watching something that was too old for myself - for a region that didn't want to schedule schools programmes in its region back in the late 1950s, Granada's programmes seem more professional in a sub-Open University sort of way.

    We watched Words and Pictures in the afternoon at school when Vicky Ireland was presenting, and so I always tuned into that as well. And You and Me as well. Mind you, I used to watch the post-News at One films on ITV as well if there were no other school programmes on the other side.

    I had come to the conclusion that home education was an agreeable thing, and I often wished that my own parents were rich enough and academic enough for me to allow me to opt out of the system and be home educated that way, but it never was. I found studying at my Central Library a lot more easier to learn about what I want to find out about then being in the same room with 29 other unruly kids. Mind you, I was an isolated person back then - I still am, come to that.

    Did anyone used to watch schools programmes when off school ill, mostly in lieu of going to school itself?
    What a fantastic trhread you have made here, George

    I did often watch Schools Programes on telly when not actualy in School yeah, and worth it , it was too. it is just a shame I never had the fore-sght to Video it all, as nothing (of much note) exists on YouTube I feel

    Once I recall a Estate/Green-patch down the way - like 5/10 mins from my Grandparents being on a School's Programe (of one occasion).

    I think in relation to School/s and Grange Hill itself - Danny summed it up perfectly - when he said to Freddie and Julie in the midst of Radio Grange Hill Vol 1 begining that we get to see all these School's Programes blah, blah, blah - reffering to Super Ted. Though bassing this on Phil Redmond issuing outlines/guidlines etc for the writers in what to write I'd describe this as a highly accurate imput via Phil and what he really did stand for Educational-wise 1980s-wise

    80sChav

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    Quote Originally Posted by angliaknight View Post
    I used to watch "The messengers", a schools prog on itv, seems so long ago now when both channels showed progs for schools in the mornings then early afternoon.i think the bbc ran "the electric company" in the afternoons as well.Our first prog would be "romper room" with miss Rosalyn at 4.30 pm on Anglia.
    Amazingly the first run of "The prisoner" in Wales was at 3.25pm on htv in the week when nothing was on the other itv stations.
    There was always of feeling of naughtiness about watching tv in the daytime.
    Most in England ran until mid-afternoon (about 2 to 2.30pm I recall) and probably nearly linking up with the CBBC Programmes (and I think with You and Me, being one of the last ones) of the Schools Programes!

    80sChav

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    I remember around lunchtimes in the early 1980s there were a lot of handy household hints programmes, one having a theme like the instrumental bit of Fame.

    It was interesting to watch old women skilfully using electric drills & doing other DIY work I had only seen my Dad do.

    At that time this was when the Australian soaps were shown, along with Emmerdale Farm.
    The Trickster On The Roof

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    Quote Originally Posted by George 1978 View Post
    It is ironic that I actually saw a lot more schools programmes on the television while I was at home then at school (and I am certain that this applies to others as well). It is connected to school days of course, although it is connected to television as well, but mostly school days...

    Picture this: I become unwell during Sunday night which meant I was unable to go to school on Monday morning. I suppose that as I hated school, there would have been a sign of relief at this prospect, and as a result, it made being ill worthwhile in many ways. Sometimes the bowl and the broadsheet newspaper sheets spread across the floor at the side of the bed indicated how ill I really was, and that I wasn't playing truant just to get off school.

    In the days, long before Jeremy Kyle and This Morning, I could almost remember being ill and staying in bed for the first time since starting school, and having the black and white portable television set in the bedroom. I knew that I did not want to miss out on my education, so I had the schools programmes on. As soon as TV-am's After Nine finished, Monday mornings meant Picture Box with Alan Rothwell first thing (never saw it at school even when I was actually there), and later on, Chris Tarrant narrated an edition of Stop, Look, Listen which was more tailored to my age group as a six year old.

    What wasn't tailored for my age because it was a lot older for me was the Granada series Experiment with Jack Smith narrating physics or chemistry experiments inside a lab, and I was thinking "what?" at watching something that was too old for myself - for a region that didn't want to schedule schools programmes in its region back in the late 1950s, Granada's programmes seem more professional in a sub-Open University sort of way.
    I can totaly convey/collaberate/know your feelings here george - as I went through so many of these myself that you describe "back in the day" They probably occured back in the days extremley late primary school to very early Secondary School Days, (though I have hazy/sketchy memories of Schools Programes still being "En-Vouge" by the powers that be of the TV Stations) in the early part of the mid 90s

    I can still recall the OU dominating BBC 2 etc etc on Saturday Mornings - very early into the 1990s too (probably '91 at a guess) too mate, but yes I can sure share your descriptions re the Programes as you described above indeed

    80sChav

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    Being from Wales there was a mix of Welsh and English school programmes on during the afternoon if I was at home ill. One was called Ffenestri (Windows) and another was Pili Palas (Butterflies). I don't remember the content of those programmes. Hyn O Fyd (This World) was a factual programme showcasing different cultures and industries around the world and that was usually quite interesting for me.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Watching schools programmes at home

    A FEW OTHER SCHOOLS PROGRAMMES IM SURE I SAW SOME OF OF.

    Maths In A Box BBC1
    Scene BBC1

    Word and Pictures BBC1
    Leap Frog ITV
    Picture Box ITV
    History On Your Doorstep ITV
    How We Use To Live ITV
    Words and Pictures, Look and Read,
    FOR THE HONOUR OF GRAYSKULL

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