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Thread: Britain in the 60s

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    Coronation Street is nostalgic and fictitious. Britain successfully embraced the 50p, £1, and £2 coins but the Americans can't get to grips with the $1 coin. They exist but customers overwhelmingly refuse them in their change and shops are reluctant to accept them. The Presidential Series of dollar coins was effectively terminated half way through with the remainder of coins just produced in small numbers for collectors rather than for circulation because the public did not want them as currency.

    Maths lessons were fun around the time of decimalisation. Annoying though for kids who had to split brain cells on £sd then no longer needed to use it. Teachers were not always in favour of decimalisation.

    Quite a lot of older folk believe that metric measurements and decimal currency have contributed to a decline in maths skills in children. What they don't realise is that the countries where children excel in maths today have had metric measurements and decimal currency for longer than anybody can remember. I think that the decline took place as a result of not updating the maths syllabus following decimalisation.

  2. #62
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    Quote Originally Posted by Arran View Post
    Coronation Street is nostalgic and fictitious. Britain successfully embraced the 50p, £1, and £2 coins but the Americans can't get to grips with the $1 coin. They exist but customers overwhelmingly refuse them in their change and shops are reluctant to accept them. The Presidential Series of dollar coins was effectively terminated half way through with the remainder of coins just produced in small numbers for collectors rather than for circulation because the public did not want them as currency.

    Maths lessons were fun around the time of decimalisation. Annoying though for kids who had to split brain cells on £sd then no longer needed to use it. Teachers were not always in favour of decimalisation.

    Quite a lot of older folk believe that metric measurements and decimal currency have contributed to a decline in maths skills in children. What they don't realise is that the countries where children excel in maths today have had metric measurements and decimal currency for longer than anybody can remember. I think that the decline took place as a result of not updating the maths syllabus following decimalisation.
    We both grew up with Coronation street and still watched it when we got married UNTIL they started telling us the storyline in advance
    I actually lived about 50 yards from Len Fairclough's house and walked past it going to school for many years ... now there's a scary thought !



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  3. #63
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    Quote Originally Posted by Arran View Post

    Maths lessons were fun around the time of decimalisation. Annoying though for kids who had to split brain cells on £sd then no longer needed to use it. Teachers were not always in favour of decimalisation.
    Don't forget of course that metrification was another big thing at the time as well - pounds and ounces v grams and kilograms, although they continued side by side for many years. How many market traders have been prosecuted for using pounds and ounces by Trading Standards - something that wouldn't have happened in the 1970s? Coronation Street dealt with that issue as early as 1961 when Florrie Lindley's Corner Shop was visited by some people from the weights and measures organisation or whatever it was called by the time (I looked this up on the Corriepedia website to find all this out!)
    I am now in my 40s (just in case anyone asks).

  4. #64
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    Quote Originally Posted by Donald the Great View Post
    Hermans Hermits still going. One of my fave Brit 60s groups.
    Peter noone is still alive but no longer part of HH.
    ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN IN THE NEXT HALF HOUR.

  5. #65
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    Quote Originally Posted by tex View Post
    Peter noone is still alive but no longer part of HH.
    My parents saw them a few years ago & my Dad noted that only the drummer as an original member.
    The Trickster On The Roof

  6. #66
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    And they say the 70s was the decade that fashion forgot...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails aaaaa.jpg  
    ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN IN THE NEXT HALF HOUR.

  7. #67
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    Quote Originally Posted by George 1978 View Post
    Don't forget of course that metrification was another big thing at the time as well - pounds and ounces v grams and kilograms, although they continued side by side for many years.
    Schools went metric gradually. The O Level exams went metric some time in the 1960s and primary schools changed over during the late 1960s through to the 1970s when new books and educational resources were purchased. Remember that there wasn't a national curriculum back then. There were still (official) vestiges of imperial when I was at primary school in the 1990 such as clothing sizes in inches, travelling distances in miles, 1/3 pint milk bottles, a pound of flesh in The Merchant of Venice, and 3 1/2 inch floppy disks.

    If there is one imperial measurement that has died in Britain since the 1960s but is still alive in the US it's fahrenheit. Fluid ounces are also fading into obscurity although they are mainstream in the US.

  8. #68
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    Quote Originally Posted by Arran View Post
    If there is one imperial measurement that has died in Britain since the 1960s but is still alive in the US it's fahrenheit. Fluid ounces are also fading into obscurity although they are mainstream in the US.
    I mentioned this in the Heatwaves and Hot Summers thread that I started earlier on this year - the fact that Fahrenheit is a bit like Michael Fish - i.e. we don't see or hear about either of them on British weather forecasts anymore. Using Fahrenheit makes it sound a lot hotter when used in heatwaves - 80 degrees v 30 degrees in Celsius.

    They will never get rid of miles from road signs or people's speedometers as it is the default measurement of road distances.

    A 1/3 of a pint milk bottles makes me think of Infant school - where else would you get them?
    I am now in my 40s (just in case anyone asks).

  9. #69
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s




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  10. #70
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    Default Re: Britain in the 60s

    You still find fahrenheit on the cover page of the Express.

    Americans love fahrenheit but despite all their claims of its virtues over celsius the British have well and truly abandoned it. I suspect that there is more public support for celsius in the US than fahrenheit in the rest of the world put together.

    The mile for road distances and pint for beer (only at retail level) are exceptional British measurements that the EU gave permission to use indefinitely. Milk is now sold in litres in Scotland but still in pints in England and Wales. Shops don't seem to sell milk in quantities less than 1 pint (or 500mL in Scotland) apart from UHT capsules for coffee and tea, and I have never seen any 1/3 pint bottles for sale even back in the 1990s. A measure of spirits in a pub was 1/6 gill or 1/5 gill in Scotland until 1985 when it changed to 25mL and pubs had to buy new optics. Some pubs in Scotland and Northern Ireland serve 35mL measures.

    The power output of radiators is more commonly quoted in BTU/hr by retailers rather than watts.

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