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Thread: Television of Yesteryear.

  1. #61
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  2. #62

    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    Children of the Stones and The feathered Serpent I remember watching. Both were pretty good, but I preferred COTS due to its creepy supernatural atmosphere.

    Child's Play was a light fluff series just right for weekend viewing. As always, Aspel was very good.

  3. #63
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    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    Quote Originally Posted by staffslad View Post
    Children of the Stones and The feathered Serpent I remember watching. Both were pretty good, but I preferred COTS due to its creepy supernatural atmosphere.

    Child's Play was a light fluff series just right for weekend viewing. As always, Aspel was very good.
    The inspiration for Small Talk, the game show presented by Ronnie Corbett which had a Celebrity Squares-alike 3x3 grid of youngsters defining certain words.

    One of them described the word "Highwayman" as saying that "Harry Secombe was one" which I thought was very clever.

    Did Michael Aspel present at least half of all networked ITV programmes in the 1980s? It seemed like that to me.
    I am now in my 40s (just in case anyone asks).

  4. #64
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    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    Quote Originally Posted by staffslad View Post
    Children of the Stones and The feathered Serpent I remember watching. Both were pretty good, but I preferred COTS due to its creepy supernatural atmosphere.

    Child's Play was a light fluff series just right for weekend viewing. As always, Aspel was very good.
    prefered childs play starring Chucky the psychopathic doll
    ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN IN THE NEXT HALF HOUR.

  5. #65
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    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    Quote Originally Posted by staffslad View Post
    Children of the Stones and The feathered Serpent I remember watching. Both were pretty good, but I preferred COTS due to its creepy supernatural atmosphere.

    Child's Play was a light fluff series just right for weekend viewing. As always, Aspel was very good.
    I rewatched COTS recently. Has dated somewhat but still is atmospheric with a neat plot.

  6. #66

    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    BJ and the Bear was a series from the late 70s. BJ McKay was a trucker who always had his pet chimpanzee, Bear, with him. It was generally light-hearted stuff with lots of pretty girls, and I thought it had a Dukes of Hazard vibe about it in terms of its overall atmosphere.

    Cade's County from the early 70s starred Glenn Ford as a south-western USA sheriff and was set in contemporary times. It had a memorable titles sequence showing Ford as Sheriff Cade driving an open top jeep over very rough desert terrain.

    Children of the Lost Islands was from the mid/late 70s and was an Australian or New Zealand production. A multi-ethnic group of teenagers are shipwrecked on a mysterious uncharted island and must contend with its inhabitants, pirates who have somehow managed to live for several hundred years--I cannot recall exactly what causes their longevity. I think it was shown on saturday mornings and possibly also in school holiday mornings TV.

    Camberwick Green was the first of a series of related children's series. It had a memorable opening of a musical box gradually opening and revealing the main character for that episode. Characters included Windy Miller, Mrs Honeyman, Dr Mopp, Mrs Dingle, Mickey Murphy and Farmer Bell. Also had memorable end credits with a clown turning a handle that scrolls the credits. Narrated by Brian Cant.

  7. #67
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    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    Quote Originally Posted by staffslad View Post
    BJ and the Bear was a series from the late 70s. BJ McKay was a trucker who always had his pet chimpanzee, Bear, with him. It was generally light-hearted stuff with lots of pretty girls, and I thought it had a Dukes of Hazard vibe about it in terms of its overall atmosphere.

    Cade's County from the early 70s starred Glenn Ford as a south-western USA sheriff and was set in contemporary times. It had a memorable titles sequence showing Ford as Sheriff Cade driving an open top jeep over very rough desert terrain.

    Children of the Lost Islands was from the mid/late 70s and was an Australian or New Zealand production. A multi-ethnic group of teenagers are shipwrecked on a mysterious uncharted island and must contend with its inhabitants, pirates who have somehow managed to live for several hundred years--I cannot recall exactly what causes their longevity. I think it was shown on saturday mornings and possibly also in school holiday mornings TV.

    Camberwick Green was the first of a series of related children's series. It had a memorable opening of a musical box gradually opening and revealing the main character for that episode. Characters included Windy Miller, Mrs Honeyman, Dr Mopp, Mrs Dingle, Mickey Murphy and Farmer Bell. Also had memorable end credits with a clown turning a handle that scrolls the credits. Narrated by Brian Cant.
    Thanks for that informative comment on these oldies mate. Can nor recall ever seeing any of them in OZ.

  8. #68
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    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    DAD'S Army: An absolute classic comedy still very popular today. Dad's Army was a comedy about the antics of the British Home Guard who are led by Capt. Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his long suffering second in command, Sgnt Wilson (John Le Mesurier) with each recruit having some comical "quirke".


  9. #69

    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    Dave Allen was, I agree, decidedly un-PC--just his smoking and drinking would create a Twitterstorm today.

    David the Gnome was voiced by Tom Bosley--Howard Cunningham from Happy Days. In the last episode David and his wife actually die as they have lived out their lifespan. It was very surprising for a children's cartoon to have such a downbeat and moving ending.

    Dear John was really good, with good scripts and characters. Remember medallion man Kirk St. Moritz?

    Come Dancing was a ballroom dancing competition in which various areas of the UK were pitted against each other. I cannot remember if the teams were professionals or amateurs. The ladies costumes were very fetching with lots of sparkle, and the contestants were constantly smiling, which I prefer to the pouts that we get today. Terry Wogan was presenter for a while and it was shown quite late at night. I would watch it if I came upon it, as opposed to Strictly Come Dancing, which I wouldn't watch if they paid me.

  10. #70
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    Default Re: Television of Yesteryear.

    Quote Originally Posted by staffslad View Post
    Dave Allen was, I agree, decidedly un-PC--just his smoking and drinking would create a Twitterstorm today.

    David the Gnome was voiced by Tom Bosley--Howard Cunningham from Happy Days. In the last episode David and his wife actually die as they have lived out their lifespan. It was very surprising for a children's cartoon to have such a downbeat and moving ending.

    Dear John was really good, with good scripts and characters. Remember medallion man Kirk St. Moritz?

    Come Dancing was a ballroom dancing competition in which various areas of the UK were pitted against each other. I cannot remember if the teams were professionals or amateurs. The ladies costumes were very fetching with lots of sparkle, and the contestants were constantly smiling, which I prefer to the pouts that we get today. Terry Wogan was presenter for a while and it was shown quite late at night. I would watch it if I came upon it, as opposed to Strictly Come Dancing, which I wouldn't watch if they paid me.
    Wasn't David the Gnome part (of a spin off) of a cartoon series seen on Children's ITV on Wednesdays in the Autumn of 1989 called The Wisdom of the Gnomes? David was seen on Channel 4 on Sunday mornings circa 1989-1990.
    I am now in my 40s (just in case anyone asks).

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