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  • #16
    Originally posted by Arran View Post

    There could have been a timeout mechanism that disconnects the call after the tape has played a certain number of times, but I will have to further investigate this.
    I imagine by the time computerised exchanges & playout systems came along this was possible, but not with the earlier ones.
    The Trickster On The Roof

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Arran View Post

      The sicker side of Thatcherite capitalism. A bit like the Deregulation of the Buses Act 1986 and the Housing Act 1988.

      One problem with premium rate numbers is that they coud be reused for completely different services in a short space of time. I can remember a time when a kid from my primary school phoned a premium rate number for some service about wildlife and the number had been reused for an erotic adult service. Her mother was absolutely horrified and wrote a letter of complaint to Oftel about it.
      I am not going to go into the whys and wherefores, but all I am saying is that I don't agree with a telephone number which could be local for all we know, but would cost the same as calling Australia. I believe in transparency.
      I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
      There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
      I'm having so much fun
      My lucky number's one
      Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Richard1978 View Post
        I imagine by the time computerised exchanges & playout systems came along this was possible, but not with the earlier ones.
        Strowger telephone exchanges had numerous counting and timing circuits. It wouldn't be too difficult to create a circuit that counted the pulses on a uniselector that were generated whenever a loop of tape has completed its cycle. After a certain number of pulses have been counted, the circuit disconnects the call.

        There were also slow acting relays that worked using a small heating element that would activate after about 5 minutes.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Arran View Post

          Strowger telephone exchanges had numerous counting and timing circuits. It wouldn't be too difficult to create a circuit that counted the pulses on a uniselector that were generated whenever a loop of tape has completed its cycle. After a certain number of pulses have been counted, the circuit disconnects the call.

          There were also slow acting relays that worked using a small heating element that would activate after about 5 minutes.
          OK I was wondering how it would have been done in the past.
          The Trickster On The Roof

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