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Thread: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

  1. #11
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    Default Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    Quote Originally Posted by culnara View Post
    Although Dennis Nelson was brought up in our neck of the woods He committed his crimes down in London
    and only got caught when complaint's were put forward about the stench coming from his drain..... body parts were found to be blocking it

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Nilsen

    Sicko
    Its 30 years since he was arrested, Killing for company by Brain Masters about Nilsen is a good read. Nilsen was evil. Killing For Company would make a good film about Nilsens life

  2. #12
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    Cool Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    I remember this being on the news everywhere.....at one point I actually thought they were looking for a man that turned into a black panther....really scared me......adults use to whisper a name in hushed tones.....
    The name...
    Lesley Whittle.

    DONALD NEILSON: THE BLACK PANTHER


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    Neilson’s hardened criminal behaviour became more entrenched with each robbery and, on 15 February 1974, during a raid on a Harrogate sub-post office, he shot dead the postmaster, Donald Skepper. Having kept a low profile following the first murder, and the ensuing police hunt, he took another life seven months later, when postmaster Derek Astin was shot dead in Lancashire during the course of another raid. The police quickly came to the conclusion that they were looking for the same killer in both cases.


    Just 9 weeks later, a third postmaster, Sidney Grayland, was shot dead during the commission of a robbery in the West Midlands. Forensic evidence at the scene linked this death to the first two. Despite the three deaths the media showed little interest in the attacks, and Neilson was dissatisfied with the lack of attention, as well as the relatively slim pickings to be had from the post office raids.


    Still searching for that elusive big payout, Neilson settled on kidnapping as his best route to success, choosing Lesley Whittle, a 17-year-old heiress to a transport fortune. He gathered as much information about her as he could, and made comprehensive plans for her incarceration, as well as the delivery of the ransom that he planned to demand for her return.


    On 14 January 1975, Neilson broke into the Whittle family’s Shropshire estate, and abducted Lesley from her bedroom without incident, leaving a ransom note that demanded 50,000. In it, he gave detailed instructions for its delivery by Lesley’s brother, Ronald, and included a warning not to involve the police. Lesley Whittle was held in a drainage shaft beneath Bathpool Park, in Staffordshire.


    The Whittle family chose not to heed the ransom warning, and informed both the local police and Scotland Yard of the abduction. Poor communication between the different police factions led to a media leak, which convinced police that the kidnapper had been scared off by the media attention. This wasn’t the case, however, and when Neilson called the designated phone box in accordance with his ransom instructions, Ronald Whittle was not there to take his call.


    Two further ransom delivery attempts were bungled over the next 72 hours, as a result of both poor police coordination and bad luck, but at least police were sure that Lesley was still alive at this time, as it was her voice that recorded the details for the second failed ransom drop, in Bathpool Park itself. On the tape she seemed calm and collected, given the circumstances. It is claimed that Neilson spotted a police vehicle in the area at the time of the second drop, and decided not to risk a police trap, aborting the ransom drop. Unbeknownst to the police, the second failed attempt ended just yards from the drainage shaft where Lesley was imprisoned, but no search of the immediate area was carried out at the time. Furious that his instructions had not been followed, Neilson waited nearby for Ronald Whittle and the police to leave, before entering the drainage shaft and killing Lesley Whittle in a rage. Had police conducted a thorough search before leaving, there was every chance they might have discovered Lesley alive.


    On the same night as the last aborted drop, Neilson was also involved in a freight train terminal robbery, in which a security guard, Gerald Smith, was fatally injured. Forensic evidence again linked the crime to the “Black Panther” post-office heists, but no connection was made to the Whittle kidnap at that time. It took police more than a week to discover Neilson’s stolen getaway vehicle, which he had abandoned close to the terminal, in which tapes of Lesley Whittle’s voice, and ransom drop instructions, were found.


    Finally making the connection between the “Black Panther” and Lesley Whittle, and given that 10 days had passed without word from her kidnapper, a proper search of Bathpool Park was instigated, and the news blackout, that had proved so ineffective, was lifted. A televised interview with Ronald Whittle, and public assistance, led to the discovery of Lesley Whittle’s body nearly two months later, on 7 March 1975. She was discovered hanging naked from a rope tied to the end of a metal hawser in the drainage shaft, and post mortem evidence revealed that she had been killed within days of her kidnapping.
    http://www.crimeandinvestigation.co....her/crime.html
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    Last edited by Romany Jones.; 13-08-2013 at 02:27. Reason: Link.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    Continued....

    THE BLACK PANTHER.


    The murder of Lesley Whittle occurred in January 1975 and dominated national headlines for 11 months. The investigation of her kidnap and murder involved over 400 officers from Shropshire, Staffordshire and West Midlands police force and the Metropolitan Police.
    Whittle, aged 17, was kidnapped from her home in Highley, Shropshire, by Donald Neilson, who by that time had committed over 400 burglaries and three fatal shootings. He was known to the British press as the Black Panther, due to his wearing a black balaclava during his Post Office raids.
    Neilson held Lesley Whittle in a drainage shaft of a reservoir at Bathpool Park in Kidsgrove, Staffordshire. He had placed a hood over her head, left her naked, and tethered her to the side of the shaft by a wire noose. After what was later seen as a bungled police operation, including two failed attempts to engage with Neilson's demand for a ransom of 50,000, her body was found hanging in the shaft on 7 March 1975.
    After arrest 11 months later in Mansfield, in July 1976 at Oxford Crown Court, Neilson was convicted of the kidnapping and murder of Lesley Whittle, for which he was sentenced to life imprisonment. Three weeks later he was convicted of the murder of three post office workers, and given three further life sentences.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Lesley_Whittle


  4. #14

    Default Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    The Moores murderers

  5. #15
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    Default Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    I'm not sure if this would count as the details have only come out recently. I'm referring to the late Jimmy Savile's long history of sexual abuse going back several decades. I saw a documentary about the once beloved television personality and it amazed me that there were actually several missed opportunities to bring Savile to justice when he was still alive.

  6. #16

    Default Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    Quote Originally Posted by victorbrunswick View Post
    I'm not sure if this would count as the details have only come out recently. I'm referring to the late Jimmy Savile's long history of sexual abuse going back several decades. I saw a documentary about the once beloved television personality and it amazed me that there were actually several missed opportunities to bring Savile to justice when he was still alive.
    He got away with so much to think I used to watch Jim fix it who else has skeletons in their cupboard we dont know about

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by amethyst View Post
    who else has skeletons in their cupboard we dont know about
    Well, as it turns out, allegedly, quite a few people it seems. Many of them seem to have worked as respected radio/television personalities. I am starting to wonder just how many 1970's adult celebrities may turn out to be sexual criminals. It is starting to feel like a blight on the whole era. Mind you, i doubt any of them can match the sheer monstrosity of saville.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    In the case of Saville it seems that everyone from the BBC to the NHS knew what he was playing at but turned a blind eye. He had friends in very high places, including the Royal Family. One of the documentaries showed a pic of Saville dressed in the uniform of a Royal Navy admiral posing with high-ranking naval officers!

  9. #19
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    Default Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    The Saville stuff is absolutely mental isn't it? I'm still surprised certain people have not been pulled in over the whole yew tree investigation. It's all sorts of crazy when you've got people you admired as a kid get dragged through that. Especially some of the folks they've pulled in. It sort of feels like having the rug pulled from under your childhoods feet.

  10. #20

    Default Re: The Pasts Most Serious Crimes

    He was a good actor playing Mr nice guy with charity events Jim fix it etc little did we know of his evil dark side

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