Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Easter

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Arran View Post
    I have wondered why, in recent decades, Easter hasn't become commercialised in a similar way to Christmas with parents buying toys etc. for their kids. All that is sold are chocolate products and a bit of cheap tat.
    Probably because of the fact that Easter has been a bit more low-key - in the run up to Easter (Lent, rather than Advent), we don't get the adverts for sales in the same vein as we would in November and early December - it's the time of year when we see gardening items and furniture store sales advertised on TV. We don't ask "what presents do you want for Easter?" in the same way as we would for Christmas or a birthday - also, I know that Clinton's and Card Factory sell them, but hardly anyone sends Easter cards to people as prominently as Christmas or birthday cards, do they? I have seen them, mostly with flowers or chicks on the front to represent spring if anything, rather than a religious festival.

    Apart from the church service (in which Justin Welby himself is doing this year at Canterbury Cathedral - worth watching as a result), and Urbi et Orbi (with the Pope as Francis and his predecessors have done so for donkey's years), and one or two documentaries on Jesus, TV programmes are business as usual, probably because it is on a Sunday anyway - in fact, Easter Monday Bank Holiday reinforces it in lieu of Sunday. BBC 1 and ITV used to show films like The Robe or Jesus Christ Superstar on Easter Sunday afternoon, or perhaps Mary Poppins or some Disney film like that. Channel 5 starting on Easter Sunday in 1997 was probably a good choice of day to launch in that respect.

    Also, there doesn't seem to be songs about Easter in the charts (Bing Crosby's Easter Parade is the only song about Easter that I can think of), compared to Christmas songs in December. Because of COVID, I have even heard of some people putting trees up in their living rooms this year, making comparisons with Christmas trees in December.

    I ordered seven different Easter eggs with my Tesco online shop, but only two were delivered on Tuesday (Csdbury Roses and Kit-Kat Chunky) - they were probably selling like hotcakes never mind hot cross buns.

    I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
    There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
    I'm having so much fun
    My lucky number's one
    Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

    Comment


    • #32
      Another difference between Christmas and Easter is that people don't pig out on food at Easter like they do at Christmas. There isn't even any specific Easter food apart from hot cross buns and a few cakes and biscuits with bunnies and chicks on them sold in supermarkets. You don't find many people piling their shopping trollies with food in supermarkets like there is no tomorrow a few days before Easter like you see a few days before Christmas. As far as the British people are concerned, Christmas isn't Christmas without a dead turkey on the table along with the obligatory sprouts and a heavy alcohol infused pudding - despite 90% of the population detesting them. The traditional Easter dinner is roast lamb but the only people who serve it are the folk who regularly cook roast dinners on Sunday. I wouldn't be surprised if chicken (not necessarily roast) is more popular than lamb nowadays but rabbit meat will always remain a niche item. It's tradition (rooted in Christianity) to eat fish on Good Friday and Holy Saturday, and abstain from meat both days, but only devout Christians (and fish lovers) seem to adhere to this tradition nowadays.

      Easter is also a relatively dry event compared with the booze fuelled Christmas. Is this because there is a certain Christmas spirit that's absent at Easter which in the modern day translates to whisky, gin, and vodka?!

      Comment


      • #33
        Black Friday appeared almost out of nowhere, so it does appear a bit weird that retailers haven't capitalised on Easter to sell more toys and other consumer goods - with the possible exception of things for the garden.

        As much as I deplore rampant consumerism at Christmas, I wouldn't mind Easter becoming a time when it becomes a cultural norm for parents to buy children bikes, scooters, outdoor toys, and summer clothes as gifts. If Christians want to keep Easter as a miserable sombre event (and Christianity is a religion built on a death cult) then so be it for them, but I don't think it's appropriate that the misery should rub off onto the nation as a whole considering the retreat of Christianity from the public realm since 1945.

        Comment


        • #34
          I think that autumn is more lucrative for sales rather than the spring - in the autumn there is the run up to Christmas. Another reason could be the fact that Christmas is the birth of Jesus and Easter is the death of Jesus - it is more normal for people to celebrate a birth than a death for obvious reasons.

          I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
          There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
          I'm having so much fun
          My lucky number's one
          Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

          Comment


          • #35
            Trying lemon hot cross bun from morrisons today there seem to be more flavours than the traditional ones,tried bramley apple,salted caramel,rhubarb & custard,chocolate they are messy putting in the toaster these have been in Aldi for a few months there are also more flavours in stores

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
              I think that autumn is more lucrative for sales rather than the spring - in the autumn there is the run up to Christmas. Another reason could be the fact that Christmas is the birth of Jesus and Easter is the death of Jesus - it is more normal for people to celebrate a birth than a death for obvious reasons.
              Easter (Sunday) is actually the celebration of the rebirth of Jesus.

              I'm not confident that the religious aspects of Christmas and Easter have any impact on modern day British people who, by and large, are not very religious and highly consumerist. Even most hardline atheists celebrate Christmas as a fun and consumerist celebration.

              The difference may well lie outside of religion. Christmas being the modern day equivalent of Saturnalia along with the fact that many secular traditions which continue to today emerged in the 19th century.

              I'm wondering if nobody has found a real way of making money out of Easter, apart from chocolate eggs. Did Toys R Us miss a trick by not holding a Black Friday style Easter sale in order to tempt parents to start buying toys as Easter presents?

              Comment


              • #37
                The Easter bunny delivering chocolate eggs is folklore in Protestant countries. The folklore in Catholic countries is that flying church bells deliver chocolate eggs.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by amethyst View Post
                  Trying lemon hot cross bun from morrisons today there seem to be more flavours than the traditional ones,tried bramley apple,salted caramel,rhubarb & custard,chocolate they are messy putting in the toaster these have been in Aldi for a few months there are also more flavours in stores
                  Chocolate hot cross buns - I can imagine putting chocolate spread on them.
                  I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                  There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                  I'm having so much fun
                  My lucky number's one
                  Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Modern day Christmas owes more to Santa than to Jesus. It really is possible to have Christmas without Jesus.

                    https://youtu.be/tEIKvJQxxvI

                    The Easter bunny doesn't have anywhere near the same level of presence or pervasiveness as Santa does - in Britain at least. Every kid in reception class fully well knows that Easter eggs are sold in supermarkets, and parents aren't afraid of buying them in front of their kids unlike with Christmas presents. I can't recall meeting anybody who believed that the Easter bunny delivered them a single chocolate egg.

                    Easter without Jesus still seems a bit undefined.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X