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Christmas When You Were Growing Up

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  • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

    Originally posted by tex View Post
    A great sense of community rarely seen these days unfortunately

    Yes, growing up we would get many Christmas cards from neighbours all round our estate. Nowadays, we get hardly any. Most have either passed away or moved away, and the new ones just don't have anywhere near the sense of community that used to exist. Social isolation is a problem now and it is going to get worse in the future.

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    • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

      Originally posted by staffslad View Post
      Yes, growing up we would get many Christmas cards from neighbours all round our estate. Nowadays, we get hardly any. Most have either passed away or moved away, and the new ones just don't have anywhere near the sense of community that used to exist. Social isolation is a problem now and it is going to get worse in the future.
      I know it's been blamed for a lot but the advent of mobile phones has killed the art of conversation, many people will now send a greeting by text instead of selecting, writing and then posting a card. I believe a card can also be sent digitally now
      Ejector seat?...your jokin!

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      • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

        Originally posted by staffslad View Post
        Yes, growing up we would get many Christmas cards from neighbours all round our estate. Nowadays, we get hardly any. Most have either passed away or moved away, and the new ones just don't have anywhere near the sense of community that used to exist. Social isolation is a problem now and it is going to get worse in the future.
        I know it has been mentioned before, but a lot of Primary Schools in the 1980s had a portable cardboard post box (painted red of course) which would usually be situated next to the secretary's office where one could send Christmas cards to people in other classes as soon as the start of December came around, as long as you wrote the recipient's name on the envelope, along with the class number or teacher's name at the top, and the monitors (aka amateur postmen) would sort it out and send them along to the relevant classes the next school day. I used to enjoy it when the girls sent me Christmas cards - I used to love their handwriting! But it is that community spirit within an institution such as a school that helps that sort of thing. If a national corporation like the Royal Mail can do it for 310 days a year, then surely a small school can.

        And even now I still try and keep that spirit going - as I said before in early December I spend over 100 on stamps and send Christmas cards in the post to people I have known over the years who have been in the same groups and organisations that I have been a member of, and have kept in touch - one organisation I was a member of had a booklet a few years ago which listed over 120 members with addresses, and they are familiar with me because of that, and I do try and send them all one in December. As a result, I do get quite a few of them plastered all over my walls by the start of the fourth week of December. My late mother used to say that one should do as one would be done by, in other words, if you are nice to someone then they should be nice to you in return, although in present day 2018 style, that isn't always the case anymore compared to 30 or 40 years ago.

        And birthdays (my own of course) I think of as being a similar thing - however, birthdays are worse than Christmas as they often fall on ordinary days of the year. I hardly get any birthday cards each year, but I got loads for my 40th this year as I wrote to people I knew using a fictitious alias as "my friend", referring to myself as the "third person" and telling them that it was his (my) birthday coming up - I was lucky to get two each year but I got around 45 of them in time for my birthday from friends, neighbours where I used to live and distant relations that I had not heard from in years. Admittedly, not all of them responded but a good proportion did - it did get a bit controversial in some ways but it was worth it at the end of the day. It was a milestone and I wanted it to be special - because of my social difficulties I had made that extra effort.
        I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
        There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
        I'm having so much fun
        My lucky number's one
        Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

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        • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

          100 on postage stamps must be around 200 cards!..I applaud you
          Ejector seat?...your jokin!

          Comment


          • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

            Originally posted by tex View Post
            100 on postage stamps must be around 200 cards!..I applaud you
            143 Christmas cards so far this year - I counted them by numbering the back of each envelope so that I could keep track of them!

            Writing letters and cards is my preferred method of communication - I am a bit of a Henry Root or Robin Cooper at times (even with the "Disgusted of Tunbridge Wels" type of letters that I send!) I feel that it is better than communicating face to face because of my anxiety and social difficulties.

            Also, as I said before, you can make a lot of friends (or at least try to) by posting them a Christmas card each year - who needs Facebook when you can do it the traditional way?
            I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
            There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
            I'm having so much fun
            My lucky number's one
            Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

            Comment


            • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

              I must add that I have not posted those Christmas cards just yet, mind you - I plan to do that in around a week's time, travelling around the different red post boxes in Nottingham (and probably beyond as well...)
              I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
              There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
              I'm having so much fun
              My lucky number's one
              Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

              Comment


              • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                I remember the school postbox at primary school and someone bringing cards round to each class. At secondary school it was just the usual card exchanges, no postbox. I, too, used to look forward to getting a card from the girls. I kept a card I got from a girl I really liked for years afterward.

                I wonder if the generation growing up will keep up the tradition of sending paper cards or will just greet each other by texts, facebook posts and other electronic means?

                Comment


                • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                  Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
                  I know it has been mentioned before, but a lot of Primary Schools in the 1980s had a portable cardboard post box (painted red of course) which would usually be situated next to the secretary's office where one could send Christmas cards to people in other classes as soon as the start of December came around, as long as you wrote the recipient's name on the envelope, along with the class number or teacher's name at the top, and the monitors (aka amateur postmen) would sort it out and send them along to the relevant classes the next school day.
                  Was it true that these post boxes came to an end because bullies posted razor blades to kids that they didn't like?

                  Comment


                  • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                    Originally posted by Arran View Post
                    Was it true that these post boxes came to an end because bullies posted razor blades to kids that they didn't like?

                    Have they come to an end? If so, I didn't know. I've never heard about razor blades being posted. It sounds like an urban myth, like razor blades in apples at Halloween, but I don't know. When my son was at junior school in the early 2000s there were still postboxes at his school.

                    Comment


                    • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                      Originally posted by staffslad View Post
                      Have they come to an end? If so, I didn't know. I've never heard about razor blades being posted. It sounds like an urban myth, like razor blades in apples at Halloween, but I don't know. When my son was at junior school in the early 2000s there were still postboxes at his school.
                      Yeah .. sounds a bit like the stories that you get your head shoved down the toilet when ya first go to high school


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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                      • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                        Originally posted by Arran View Post
                        Was it true that these post boxes came to an end because bullies posted razor blades to kids that they didn't like?
                        I have never heard of that one, but if one gets to the age where one starts to shave then it could be their way of trying to tell you something...
                        I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                        There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                        I'm having so much fun
                        My lucky number's one
                        Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                        Comment


                        • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                          So...black friday and cyber monday, does anybody wait to do xmas shopping on these days and are there substantial savings to be had? Some circles are saying that its all a con and that the prices being offered on many goods can be found at most times of the year. Its also being blamed for the death of the high street and one of the main reasons so many shops are shutting down. if so i am guilty as charged because i buy most things online at christmas.
                          Ejector seat?...your jokin!

                          Comment


                          • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                            I think that one of the biggest differences between Christmas in the 1990s and Christmas now is that people bought gifts in shops but increasingly buy gifts online now. Town centres used to be packed out with shoppers in the run up to Christmas but in more recent years crowds have noticeably dwindled. Thousands of kids would descend on Toys R Us every December to pick out toys they wanted. More often than not, parents bought the toys at times when their kids weren't with them and it was commonplace for popular toys to sell out. One year desperate parents were buying Thunderbirds Tracy Island off other parents in shopping centres and the Toys R Us car park at more than twice the price when shops had sold out. Toys R Us is no more.

                            Comment


                            • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                              I don't think that Black Friday really works in Britain - in this country shoppers are (or should be in a stereotypical way) calm, friendly and are very good at queueing - well, around 50 years ago at least. Black Friday indicates the opposite - people getting hurt, security guards having their work cut out, police being called etc. In recent years I have tried to avoid shopping on those days. We just cannot adopt American traditions like that - it just doesn't work very well over here. And I would stay away from Oxford Street in Central London on those days as well.

                              Around 10 to 15 years ago, Black Friday (now Mad Friday) meant the Friday before Christmas (17th to 23rd December) where people get drunk and legless, and all that sort of thing. In Wales, Black Friday means something different like that:

                              https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-wal...riday-in-wales

                              I prefer "Back to normal Monday" (4th to 10th January) which is the week before Blue Monday.
                              I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                              There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                              I'm having so much fun
                              My lucky number's one
                              Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                              Comment


                              • Re: Christmas When You Were Growing Up

                                Originally posted by Arran View Post
                                I think that one of the biggest differences between Christmas in the 1990s and Christmas now is that people bought gifts in shops but increasingly buy gifts online now. Town centres used to be packed out with shoppers in the run up to Christmas but in more recent years crowds have noticeably dwindled. Thousands of kids would descend on Toys R Us every December to pick out toys they wanted. More often than not, parents bought the toys at times when their kids weren't with them and it was commonplace for popular toys to sell out. One year desperate parents were buying Thunderbirds Tracy Island off other parents in shopping centres and the Toys R Us car park at more than twice the price when shops had sold out. Toys R Us is no more.
                                Victoria Centre in Nottingham (which I affectionally think Nottingham's answer to London's Oxford Street) is often packed during the Wednesdays before Christmas - sometimes you can't move forwards because of shoppers going in both directions. Don't get me wrong - an atmosphere where so many people are going to purchase Christmas presents feels like a high spirited environment, but you do feel that the reason why they are there in the first place is due to commercialisation. One of my nephew's birthday is a week before Christmas, and so I had to get a birthday present for him while most were getting Christmas ones, and of course, the birthday cards in Clinton's and WHSmith were incognito because of Christmas cards on display.

                                As I said before, the Friday before Christmas is one of the biggest Christmas shopping days - when Robot Wars was on BBC 2, the Sir Killalot toy was on sale in Argos, on that day in 2001 and I spent around 165 on getting two of them for my nephew and getting the batteries that weren't included (there were three batteries as there was a "buy two get one free" offer on them). Along with seven bags of Tesco shopping, I had to get a taxi back home (although I felt that I needed a removal van!) When it came to, I had got the wrong Robot Wars toy, and so the following day, they had to go back to Argos in the boot of a relative's car, whilst I ended up playing Hide and Seek on Friday evening and trying to find where I put the damn receipt that I put down somewhere. I tell you, Christmas shopping can be frustrating in itself, even if the end results come the 25th can be rewarding.
                                I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                                There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                                I'm having so much fun
                                My lucky number's one
                                Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                                Comment

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