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Working class vs middle class

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Arran View Post
    My mother used to think that NHS glasses for children were a bit naff back in the 1970s and 80s. The limited number of styles available were not attractive and they had not been updated since the 1940s. This was interpreted as how rigid and conservative the NHS really was, and their failure to adapt to meet the needs and requirements of consumers. There was probably some novelty surrounding NHS glasses in the 1940s, but a lot of kids hated wearing them in the 1970s, and were known to snap them up or throw them in the bin. They would get another pair, courtesy of the taxpayer, and the cycle would often repeat. NHS glasses for children probably weren't very good value for money in the 1970s and 80s, and the Thatcher government did the right thing replacing them with a voucher even if it was a case of privatising the NHS via the back door.
    There was that stereotype that children were certainly behind academically due to their poor eyesight as most thought that they were no good - ironic then that in later years spectacles were associated with intelligence and being knowledgeable in life. The NHS was founded under a post-War Labour government by Bevin (or Bevan?) (I just cannot imagine HG wearing NHS glasses!)

    I lost count how many pairs of glasses were damaged due to bullying in the playground, footballs thrown in my face in PE and God knows what else. Any kid wearing them in the school playground becomes a novelty sight (no pun intended) "Can I try your glasses on?" the kids asked. "No way - go to Dolland and Aitchison, read the Snellen chart from top to bottom (especially the bottom), and get your own" I should have said.
    I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
    There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
    I'm having so much fun
    My lucky number's one
    Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Arran View Post
      Are free school meals a sign of being working class or a sign of being poor?
      I went home for dinner so I must have been more elite than others were.
      I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
      There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
      I'm having so much fun
      My lucky number's one
      Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by George 1978 View Post

        It took me three weeks to finish a bottle of sherry - I must be upper-middle class.

        Surely upper-middle class people prefer Madeira?

        Anyway, I guess another way of telling your class is if your evening meal is your dinner, whereas don't working class oiks call it their "tea"? ;-)

        Also, pronouncing the letter H (aitch) as "haitch" is a dead giveaway for being working class.
        Remember Parker in Thunderbirds? A salt-of-the-Earth working class bloke, who tried to sound posh when talking to his decidedly upper class employer Lady Penelope, by saying things like "I hanticipated that m'lady".

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        • #49
          Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
          I went home for dinner so I must have been more elite than others were.
          Very elite. My primary school did not allow kids to leave the premises at lunch time unless there were exceptional reasons.

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          • #50
            I went home for dinner too, there were two of us that went home. There was a lollipop lady that crossed us over the main road and when she retired the local paper did a feature on her and we had our photo taken with her for the paper.
            The only thing to look forward to is the past

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            • #51
              I was at primary school at the time of the Dunblane massacre, so they upped security afterwards including restricting kids from leaving the premises at lunch time.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Arran View Post

                Very elite. My primary school did not allow kids to leave the premises at lunch time unless there were exceptional reasons.
                I don't think so - as long as you were not late back to school in the afternoon it didn't matter.
                I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                I'm having so much fun
                My lucky number's one
                Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by HG View Post
                  I went home for dinner too, there were two of us that went home. There was a lollipop lady that crossed us over the main road and when she retired the local paper did a feature on her and we had our photo taken with her for the paper.
                  One of the advantages of living within the catchment area of the schools that we went to.

                  I am certain that our Infant School lollipop lady gave us a Christmas card one year - reminds me of that 1990s Quality Street advert where one of them did the job in all weathers.
                  I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                  There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                  I'm having so much fun
                  My lucky number's one
                  Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Cartimand View Post

                    Surely upper-middle class people prefer Madeira?
                    I wouldn't know - I don't drink that often.

                    I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                    There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                    I'm having so much fun
                    My lucky number's one
                    Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                    Comment

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