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Life in Britain in the early 1980s

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  • #91
    Originally posted by Arran View Post

    New Labour (contrary to popular belief) was not a personal project of Tony Blair.
    I am certain that New Labour wasn't coined when John Smith was Labour Party leader, and certainly not when Kinnock was leader - it was certainly "founded" not long after Blair became leader. Major was veering more right-wing and I think that after 18 years most people had enough, but in 1997 the political map still looked blue because all the big sized rural constituencies remained Conservatives.

    I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
    There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
    I'm having so much fun
    My lucky number's one
    Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

    Comment


    • #92
      Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
      I have thought of Granada as being a very Labour Party, Grauniad readers' company - think of how many left-wing series produced by them such as What the Papers Say, University Challenge, World in Action, and a lot of tweed jacket journalists and writers such as Ray Gosling, Michael Apted, Colin Welland and so on. Cross the Pennines and Yorkshire TV feels like a Daily Telegraph retired Sergeant Major company with older, more conservative people on there - Bruce Gyngell was CEO of YTV and Tyne Tees and tried to take the television industry back a few decades by banning programmes with smut in them, even though they were on after 9.00 pm. Central felt like a students' TV company with no whiff of traditional ITV in the 1980s - they were a bit like Marks and Spencer's Food Hall - they preferred their own brand goods rather than other people's. I bet that it was a huge shock to the system to see the traditional ATV around from the mid 1950s give away to this 1980s "new kid on the block".

      I thought that Southern had lost in a similar way that ATV had to change - poor coverage towards the east of its region - originally the South East was advertised separately with Anglia and the London companies applying although Southern won, and so, the South East was advertised along with the South. And Westward lost because of its business plan, although as TSW already took over Westward in August 1981, the transition on New Year's Day 1982 was as smooth as the ATV/Central one.
      Granada only had one competitor in the 1980 franchise round. Merseyvision which was the project of a number of academics both at the University of Liverpool and Liverpool Polytechnic. It was a weak application and the group appeared to have no concept of what was involved in making network programmes, along with no source of finance disclosed. Its application largely consisted of slagging off Granada, the ITV network, and even the IBA itself, that their staff wondered why Merseyvision even wanted to be part of ITV!

      Even in the event of Merseyvision being handed the North West England franchise, it would have replaced an ITV company heavily biased towards Manchester with one just as heavily biased towards Liverpool.

      Southern had already bought land in Maidstone for a new TV studio for the 1980s to serve the eastern part of the region and replace the small studio they had in Dover. In the event of losing the franchise they sold the land to TVS at a considerable profit.

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
        I am certain that New Labour wasn't coined when John Smith was Labour Party leader, and certainly not when Kinnock was leader - it was certainly "founded" not long after Blair became leader. Major was veering more right-wing and I think that after 18 years most people had enough, but in 1997 the political map still looked blue because all the big sized rural constituencies remained Conservatives.
        The seeds of New Labour had been planted in the late 1980s when the Labour Party realised that there weren't enough blue collar working class folk left in Britain to enable them to win a general election, so they had to diversify in order to attact a sufficiently broad demographic of people rather than targetting their traditional demographic. Electability, rather than purity of ideology, had taken the centre stage following the 1987 general election.

        There is some evidence that Labour relied on the public sector worker vote, rather than the working class vote, during the period from 2003 to 2015. The provision of public services, as opposed to economic reform or worker's rights, was the centrepiece of New Labour ideology.

        I previously mentioned about the decline of the trade unions as a result of the decline in heavy industry, and how both the trade unions and Labour have failed to engage with and represent the new working class in low skill low paid positions in the service sector.

        https://forums.doyouremember.co.uk/f...744#post282744

        Comment


        • #94
          Take into account that Southern lost some of its territory in the change from 405 line VHF to 625 line UHF.

          The UHF signal from the Dover transmitter was too weak in north Kent, so a new transmitter was installed at Bluebell Hill, but for some stupid reason it was assigned to the London ITV region so viewers got Thames and LWT instead of Southern.

          Therefore, it would be disingenuous to criticise Southern for poor coverage in Kent when it only has half of Kent in its territory on UHF and the number of VHF viewers were declining during the 1970s and early 1980s.

          The Bluebell Hill transmitter also served south Essex whilst it broadcast Thames and LWT, as it provided a stronger signal than the Crystal Palace transmitter. When Bluebell Hill was changed to the south east ITV region in 1982 it resulted in TVS effectively having most viewers in south Essex in its territory. Many viewers in south Essex continued to watch TVS, and later Meridian, rather than re-align their TV aerial to Crystal Palace.

          Comment


          • #95
            Originally posted by Arran View Post

            Granada only had one competitor in the 1980 franchise round. Merseyvision which was the project of a number of academics both at the University of Liverpool and Liverpool Polytechnic. It was a weak application and the group appeared to have no concept of what was involved in making network programmes, along with no source of finance disclosed. Its application largely consisted of slagging off Granada, the ITV network, and even the IBA itself, that their staff wondered why Merseyvision even wanted to be part of ITV!

            Even in the event of Merseyvision being handed the North West England franchise, it would have replaced an ITV company heavily biased towards Manchester with one just as heavily biased towards Liverpool.

            Southern had already bought land in Maidstone for a new TV studio for the 1980s to serve the eastern part of the region and replace the small studio they had in Dover. In the event of losing the franchise they sold the land to TVS at a considerable profit.
            I assume that Merseyvision was nothing to do with North West TV that Phil Redmond founded to bid against Granada in 1991 and lost (failed the quality test, apparently), probably because of safeguarding Coronation Street - I say this because it had a similar name to Mersey TV in which Redmond made Brookside and Hollyoaks for Channel Four. .
            I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
            There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
            I'm having so much fun
            My lucky number's one
            Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

            Comment


            • #96
              Originally posted by Arran View Post
              The Bluebell Hill transmitter also served south Essex whilst it broadcast Thames and LWT, as it provided a stronger signal than the Crystal Palace transmitter. When Bluebell Hill was changed to the south east ITV region in 1982 it resulted in TVS effectively having most viewers in south Essex in its territory. Many viewers in south Essex continued to watch TVS, and later Meridian, rather than re-align their TV aerial to Crystal Palace.
              The Bluebell Hill transmitter has the accolade of having the most ITV companies serving it, and I believe that it was in power from day one on 22nd September 1955 - not counting breakfast television companies, it has had a new company each time - Associated-Rediffusion and ATV from 1955 to 1958, Thames and LWT from 1968 to 1982, in which a region change from London to the south and TVS from 1982 to 1993 and Meridian from 1993 onwards.
              I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
              There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
              I'm having so much fun
              My lucky number's one
              Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
                The Bluebell Hill transmitter has the accolade of having the most ITV companies serving it, and I believe that it was in power from day one on 22nd September 1955 - not counting breakfast television companies, it has had a new company each time - Associated-Rediffusion and ATV from 1955 to 1958, Thames and LWT from 1968 to 1982, in which a region change from London to the south and TVS from 1982 to 1993 and Meridian from 1993 onwards.
                Bluebell Hill opened in 1974. It never broadcast Associated Rediffusion or ATV.

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
                  I assume that Merseyvision was nothing to do with North West TV that Phil Redmond founded to bid against Granada in 1991 and lost (failed the quality test, apparently), probably because of safeguarding Coronation Street - I say this because it had a similar name to Mersey TV in which Redmond made Brookside and Hollyoaks for Channel Four. .
                  Merseyvision and North West TV were completely separate companies.

                  I have a cynical view that Granada was undefeatable at a franchise round because of Coronation Street. If Granada lost in 1980 then that could have been the end of Coronation Street. If Granada lost in 1991 then Coronation Street would probably move over to Sky in 1993.

                  Granada was a conglomerate in the 1980s that even owned motorway service stations.

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Thames managed to keep on making The Bill and a few other shows for years after losing their franchise.

                    I remember they were part of the original plans for Channel 5, a few years before it was actually launched.
                    The Trickster On The Roof

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Richard1978 View Post
                      Thames managed to keep on making The Bill and a few other shows for years after losing their franchise.
                      One notable loss was the current affairs programme This Week (previously known as TV Eye) that was originally produced by Associated Rediffusion back in 1956.

                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_W...6_TV_programme)

                      It was a very prominent programme in the 1980s and could be considered as a national institution.

                      Comment


                      • What were schools like during the early 1980s?

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Arran View Post
                          What were schools like during the early 1980s?
                          well, I left school in 1980 , signed on for unemployment benefit as soon as I walked out the gates after my last o level exam ,as my employment as an apprentice didn’t start until September.
                          I got 40 quid a fortnight , half went to my mum and half of that , she put in a bank account for me.
                          id never been so rich! I had a tenner a week to spend on anything I wanted (usually records or guitar strings)

                          very few pupils stayed on for 6th form , there was maybe 3 or 4 in our school.
                          calculators were not allowed in exams , no such thing as IT studies.
                          Some subjects at school were only available to certain student grades. I was in the top level but unable to take car maintenance class.
                          there was home Ec (cookery) ,needlework class and childcare class for the girls.
                          boys done metalwork , woodwork, tech drawing. Would be seen as sexist now but was the norm then


                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Arran View Post

                            Bluebell Hill opened in 1974. It never broadcast Associated Rediffusion or ATV.
                            I wondered as they broadcast London region programmes first whether they were around from day one.
                            I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                            There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                            I'm having so much fun
                            My lucky number's one
                            Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Arran View Post

                              One notable loss was the current affairs programme This Week (previously known as TV Eye) that was originally produced by Associated Rediffusion back in 1956.

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_W...6_TV_programme)

                              It was a very prominent programme in the 1980s and could be considered as a national institution.
                              I was a huge fan of Rainbow (even though my age was in double figures by the early 1990s) and so Thames' loss was a big blow there as well.

                              But, it just shows that This Week being axed was the start of dumbing down on ITV - if Thames made a soap opera in the same vein as Coronation Street, you can bet your life that it would have probably be still running today. The nearest they had to that was indeed The Bill which lasted another 17 years.


                              I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                              There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                              I'm having so much fun
                              My lucky number's one
                              Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Arran View Post
                                What were schools like during the early 1980s?
                                I started Infant School in 1983 (the Nursery part a year before) - we still had the Joyce Grenfell-stereotype of teachers in the school, as well as the small sized bottles of milk (ironic that the "milk snatcher" as she was called over a decade before, was by then, PM).

                                I returned to the school in 1995 for a 25 year reunion and gave as many antidotes as I could remember then - when I started originally it was a huge change aged 4-5 to come from a home environment and into this place full of adults and kids who were strangers to me - and they always said "never talk to strangers"... And I was used to the toilet at home that one had the odd "accident" while I was there.
                                I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                                There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                                I'm having so much fun
                                My lucky number's one
                                Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                                Comment

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