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Life in Britain in the early 1980s

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  • #61
    Originally posted by George 1978 View Post

    Scargill's finest hour.
    Some would also say Thatcher's too after the Falklands as she could play left wingers like Scargill like a fiddle.
    The Trickster On The Roof

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    • #62
      Originally posted by Richard1978 View Post
      I remember by early 1990s BMXs were on they way out because Mountain Bikes were popular by then.
      The legend was that the day when the last BMX rolled off the production line at the Raleigh factory was the day that BMX in Britain officially died. The exact day is one of the nation's best kept secrets but it illustrated the power that Raleigh once had in deciding which type of bike was mainstream and which wasn't.

      Raleigh had started working on mountain bikes in 1985 because they wanted to manufacture a type of bike that could appeal to both children and adults. The adult bike market in the early 1980s was very small both in comparison to the children's bike market at the time and the adult bike market of the 2000s.

      Adults in the early 1980s generally didn't go cycling. My mother says that a man riding a bike in the early 1980s was often viewed as being unemployed (remember Norman Tebbit) and a woman was often viewed as not having a driving licence, unless they were clearly a university student or a lycra clad racing bike enthusiast out on a Sunday.

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by Arran View Post
        It's also debatable whether it was the bikes or the sport that was the driving force behind sales of BMX in the early 1980s. It is notable that the predominant sport was racing in the early 1980s whereas it was tricks in the late 1990s. BMX tracks sprang up in every town in Britain during the early 1980s.

        There was a craze for plastic mag wheels in the early 1980s but experienced riders (as opposed to kids who wanted to show off to their friends) knew they were a gimmick more than anything else. They never really made a comeback during the revival of the late 1990s.
        Does anyone remember those badged-sized coloured plastic lights that you could put on your bike, and was available free in packs of Kellogg's Corn Flakes? - I think that they called them "spokey-dokeys" or something. When you cycled, they would light up. They were advertised during Children's ITV ad breaks.
        I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
        There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
        I'm having so much fun
        My lucky number's one
        Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Richard1978 View Post

          Some would also say Thatcher's too after the Falklands as she could play left wingers like Scargill like a fiddle.
          The TV-am interview with Scargill from 1984 is worth watching on YouTube - fascinating to see John Stapleton interview him, and you know that Scargill looks out of place on that Thatcherite TV-am sofa.
          I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
          There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
          I'm having so much fun
          My lucky number's one
          Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by George 1978 View Post

            Does anyone remember those badged-sized coloured plastic lights that you could put on your bike, and was available free in packs of Kellogg's Corn Flakes? - I think that they called them "spokey-dokeys" or something. When you cycled, they would light up. They were advertised during Children's ITV ad breaks.
            Indeed!...also the esso petrol giveaway tiger tails that you would put on the handlegrips, plastic brake pull covers, spoke clackers, stick on frame transfers,the little square solenoid powered lights, puncture repair kit pouch on the back of the seat, bulb style horns......Wow talk about pimp my ride!
            Ejector seat?...your jokin!

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by amethyst View Post
              Miners strike of 1984
              That's a huge subject in its own right.

              My mother was astounded at how many police officers had been called in to confront the miners. She spotted police vehicles from most of the forces in the south of England up in Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by Arran View Post

                That's a huge subject in its own right.

                My mother was astounded at how many police officers had been called in to confront the miners. She spotted police vehicles from most of the forces in the south of England up in Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire.
                Did the trade unions of any other professions back in the 1980s have as much prominence in the news back then as the miners did when they went on strike? As a school pupil (i.e. a consumer of education) back then I know that the NASUWT and NUT had the occasional strike, and thus, we had the odd day off from school, or it was the case that the UNISON people such as the lollipop ladies and cleaners and all that did the same, and so with the former, we had a policeman showing us across the road instead at morning rush hour. I don't think that either Nigel de Gruchy or Doug McAvoy were the Arthur Scargill of teaching unions were they? - they never had such high profile even if they served minors rather than miners.
                I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                I'm having so much fun
                My lucky number's one
                Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by tex View Post

                  Indeed!...also the esso petrol giveaway tiger tails that you would put on the handlegrips, plastic brake pull covers, spoke clackers, stick on frame transfers,the little square solenoid powered lights, puncture repair kit pouch on the back of the seat, bulb style horns......Wow talk about pimp my ride!
                  I might look for that old Kellogg's Corn Flakes advert on YouTube, circa 1990 in which an excited Timmy Mallet-alike voiceover said: "some people, c ock-a-doodle-doo! While some people, c ock-a-doodle-don't".
                  Last edited by George 1978; 21-06-2021, 02:24.
                  I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                  There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                  I'm having so much fun
                  My lucky number's one
                  Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    I remember my Grandad used to ride a bike in the 1980s until he got too old, though he never owned a car.

                    My uncle also liked to cycle where possible.
                    The Trickster On The Roof

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Richard1978 View Post
                      Some would also say Thatcher's too after the Falklands as she could play left wingers like Scargill like a fiddle.
                      Thatcher was not a woman of war. She knew nothing about warfare. She probably didn't know one end of a rifle from the other!

                      Her strategy was to place trust in our military top brass then reap the rewards of the victory. She ended up as a superhero who did nothing except subcontract out decision making to people with the expertise in fighting wars.

                      My mother thought that Thatcher was a bit of a fraud who was potentially trying to set herself up as another Winston Churchill (a superhero who was a lousy peacetime politician) after the Falklands victory, except that her finest hour wasn't her own.


                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Richard1978 View Post
                        I remember my Grandad used to ride a bike in the 1980s until he got too old, though he never owned a car.

                        My uncle also liked to cycle where possible.
                        Norman Tebbit would have been proud of him.
                        I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                        There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                        I'm having so much fun
                        My lucky number's one
                        Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Arran View Post

                          Thatcher was not a woman of war. She knew nothing about warfare. She probably didn't know one end of a rifle from the other!

                          Her strategy was to place trust in our military top brass then reap the rewards of the victory. She ended up as a superhero who did nothing except subcontract out decision making to people with the expertise in fighting wars.

                          My mother thought that Thatcher was a bit of a fraud who was potentially trying to set herself up as another Winston Churchill (a superhero who was a lousy peacetime politician) after the Falklands victory, except that her finest hour wasn't her own.
                          Some people even thought of Tony Blair in the same way because of the Iraq War - back in the 1980s, was there any other female leader in politics anywhere in the world that took more clout than Thatcher?

                          I suppose in many ways she was just a leader who happened to be female. The "Diana Gould on Nationwide" interview is worth watching as Gould did to Thatcher what Robin Day or Frost would never have done on a TV programme. "You said in the first part of your answer..." etc.

                          My late mother would have been a bit more pro-Thatcher than anyone else, but on the other hand, my late father did vote for the SDP Liberal Alliance in 1987.

                          I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                          There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                          I'm having so much fun
                          My lucky number's one
                          Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
                            Some people even thought of Tony Blair in the same way because of the Iraq War - back in the 1980s, was there any other female leader in politics anywhere in the world that took more clout than Thatcher?

                            I suppose in many ways she was just a leader who happened to be female. The "Diana Gould on Nationwide" interview is worth watching as Gould did to Thatcher what Robin Day or Frost would never have done on a TV programme. "You said in the first part of your answer..." etc.

                            My late mother would have been a bit more pro-Thatcher than anyone else, but on the other hand, my late father did vote for the SDP Liberal Alliance in 1987.
                            There was a massive difference between Thatcher and Blair. The Falklands war was a case of defending a British territory after it was invaded by Argentina, whereas the Iraq war was a (potentially illegal) case of fighting somebody else's war with no direct benefit to Britain.

                            My mother says that if she was old enough to vote in the 1983 general election then she would seriously have considered voting Labour. The Falklands victory effected handed Thatcher a licence to con the public into thinking that she was a true patriot, when in reality she would sink Britain ever deeper into the EU and wreck strategic manufacturing and engineering industries at the behest of the City spivs. Labour had a leader with poor image and economic policies that were too hard left for most people's tastes, but they were committed to withdrawing Britain from the EU and understood the value of manufacturing and engineering industries over investment banking.

                            An analogy is that the Conservative Party under Thatcher was a patriotic party as much as an XR3i was a sports car. Ford managed to con thousands of working class folk from Essex that a family hatchback with a spoiler on the boot lid powered by a gasping 1.6 litre engine with a few extra HP provided by Bosch K-Jetronic was a sports car. Thatcher managed to con thousands of working class folk from Essex that the Conservatives were a patriotic party by kicking the Argentinians out of an obscure island in the south Atlantic, along with a guilt by association type claim that Labour has the same policy as the Communist Party, namely withdrawal from the EU.

                            In both cases the public had to pay for extras…

                            https://forums.doyouremember.co.uk/f...u-pay-for-more

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
                              Did the trade unions of any other professions back in the 1980s have as much prominence in the news back then as the miners did when they went on strike? As a school pupil (i.e. a consumer of education) back then I know that the NASUWT and NUT had the occasional strike, and thus, we had the odd day off from school, or it was the case that the UNISON people such as the lollipop ladies and cleaners and all that did the same, and so with the former, we had a policeman showing us across the road instead at morning rush hour. I don't think that either Nigel de Gruchy or Doug McAvoy were the Arthur Scargill of teaching unions were they? - they never had such high profile even if they served minors rather than miners.
                              There was the ITV strike and Red Robbo in British Leyland, but that was in the late 1970s.

                              Another prominent strike with plenty of media coverage was the Wapping newspaper print workers in 1986. It was caused by new computer technology killing the jobs of print workers who operated now obsolete traditional printing machinery.

                              The NUM was capable of holding the government to ransom during the 1970s and 80s because a high proportion of electricity was generated in coal fired power stations. The militancy of Scargill combined with environmental legislation sounded the death knell of coal fired power stations in Britain.

                              The reality of the matter was that British coal mining had officially died around 1970 and was in the process of being gradually wound down as demand for coal dwindled. By 1980 the primary purpose of British coal mines was to supply coal to power stations as other markets were now very limited.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Arran View Post

                                My mother says that if she was old enough to vote in the 1983 general election then she would seriously have considered voting Labour. The Falklands victory effected handed Thatcher a licence to con the public into thinking that she was a true patriot, when in reality she would sink Britain ever deeper into the EU and wreck strategic manufacturing and engineering industries at the behest of the City spivs. Labour had a leader with poor image and economic policies that were too hard left for most people's tastes, but they were committed to withdrawing Britain from the EU and understood the value of manufacturing and engineering industries over investment banking.
                                I have heard of a lot of people who said that Michael Foot didn't even look like a Prime Minister when they saw the repeat of the 1983 General Election coverage on BBC Parliament. In the Nottingham City constituencies, the Conservatives won in all three, even though in Nottingham East for example, the Labour candidate was defeated on over 16,000 votes - a thousand more than his counterpart in 1979. Also, the SDP took around 3,000 votes away from Labour and had 4,000 more votes than the Liberal candidate in 1979, allowing the Conservative candidate to win, who was even opposed by an Independent Conservative candidate. Ironic that this was the election when Corbyn was elected for the first time.

                                Labour were too left-wing under Foot, hence the "Gang of Four" and the foundation of the SDP - people still remember the Winter of Discontent in 1978-1979 which was full of strikes i.e. bins not emptied for a month and all that - that was one reason why Thatcher set foot in Downing Street as PM. Also, the left-wingness of Labour was another reason why Robert Kilroy-Silk took the Chiltern Hundreds in order to launch a career as a TV presenter.
                                I've everything I need to keep me satisfied
                                There's nothing you can do to make me change my mind
                                I'm having so much fun
                                My lucky number's one
                                Ah! Oh! Ah! Oh!

                                Comment

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