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Stamp Vending Machines

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  • I. R. Fincham
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    These days you can buy them at corner shops and supermarkets, no need to go to a post office.

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  • George 1978
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    It would be nice if stamp vending machines were brought back just in case one needs stamps and the nearest Post Office happens to be closed - they can be just as handy as cashpoints are when you need money.

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  • 80sChav
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    I can recall in my Home Town a Stamp Machine attached to the General's Wall outside (in like a sort ATM Style-type way).

    This was probably operational untilI'd say about may-be 2002/03 and still remains there now where you can see the rembrants of it Lol

    80sChav

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  • Arran
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
    I assume that they were aimed at those who were just about to post letters, and then realised that they had forgot to put stamps on the envelopes - or indeed, those who had forgotten to put stamps on the envelopes, and left their wallet at home in which case it would have been useless for them.
    SVMs that dispensed individual stamps were often used by folk who bought stamps as and when they needed them. Also take into account that people sent many postcards as well as letters. SVMs that dispensed books of stamps were ideal for replenishing your supply of stamps at home. In the decades when SVMs were commonplace, queues at post offices could be substantial and annoying for anybody who just needed a stamp or two.

    Many people liked books of stamps that were 2nd class with extra stamps to increase the value to 1st class.

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  • George 1978
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    I am used to buying booklets of 12 first class stamps so I needn't worry.

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  • tex
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    paid 7.30 for a pack of 12 second class stamps yesterday....the worlds gone mad!

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  • George 1978
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    I assume that they were aimed at those who were just about to post letters, and then realised that they had forgot to put stamps on the envelopes - or indeed, those who had forgotten to put stamps on the envelopes, and left their wallet at home in which case it would have been useless for them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arran
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    A PB29 elliptical shaped pillar box with an in-built SVM round the back, located in Ealing. The letter slot is on the opposite side. The SVM is a B4 type, dating back to 1935, and in its latest incarnation took 1p coins and dispensed individual 1p stamps. It was decommissioned around 1975 when rising postage rates made them inconvenient for consumers and uneconomical for the Post Office to operate.

    Attached Files

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  • Arran
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    Originally posted by George 1978 View Post
    I would have thought that even in 1973 never mind 1977 or 1982, there would be very little use for a p stamp.
    Making up values from a combination of stamps and annual price increases were in multiples of p. Take into account that post offices sell 1p stamps that are worth less today than a p stamp was in the early 1980s.

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  • George 1978
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    I would have thought that even in 1973 never mind 1977 or 1982, there would be very little use for a p stamp.

    I thought that the cost of a first class stamp would roughly be the same price as a tabloid newspaper back then - I know that around 1987-1988, the 18p stamp was a dark green colour - was the second class stamp a light blue colour back then?

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  • Arran
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    In 1973 first class cost 3 p and second class cost 3p
    A 5p strip of stamps consisted of 2p, 1p, 1p, p, p

    In 1977 first class cost 8 p or 9p and second class cost 6 p or 7p
    A 10p strip of stamps consisted of 6p, 2p, 1p, p, p
    A 50p book of stamps consisted of 9p, 9p, 9p, 7p, 7p, 7p, 1p, 1p

    In 1982 first class cost 15 p and second class cost 12 p
    A 50p book of stamps consisted of 12 p, 12 p, 12 p, 3p, 3p, 3p, 3p, p

    In 1987 first class cost 18p and second class cost 13p
    A 50p book of stamps consisted of 18p, 18p, 13p, 1p or 13p, 13p, 13p, 5p, 5p, 1p
    A 1 book of stamps consisted of 18p, 18p, 18p, 18p, 18p, 13p worth 1.03

    In 1992 first class cost 24p and second class cost 18p
    A 50p book of stamps consisted of 24p, 24p, 1p, 1p
    A 1 book of stamps consisted of 24p, 24p, 24p, 24p, 2p, 2p

    In 1995 first class cost 25p and second class cost 19p
    A 50p book of stamps consisted of 25p, 25p
    A 1 book of stamps consisted of 25p, 25p, 25p, 25p

    In 1998 first class cost 26p and second class cost 20p
    A 1 book of stamps consisted of 26p, 26p, 26p, 20p, 1p, 1p

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  • George 1978
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    I would have thought that it would be like using a payphone and putting coins into the machine - or like Nottingham City Transport bus fares (says he, who has had a pass for over 20 years). They would prefer you to "overpay" and not give change if you didn't have the correct amount.

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  • Arran
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    The SVMs that dispensed books of stamps gave change in the form of a few low value stamps. The philatelic community will probably have the details of the exact composition of each book of stamps issued over the years.

    I'm sure that the electronic SVMs inside post offices that dispensed individual stamps gave change as they accepted all coins.

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  • George 1978
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    I would prefer to wait and get stamps from a shop instead of getting them from a machine that does not give change.

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  • Arran
    replied
    Re: Stamp Vending Machines

    My mother can remember the G3 SVMs back in the 1970s and the (very similar) H and J SVMs in the 1980s and 1990s.

    The G3 took 10p coins and dispensed a mixed value strip of 5 stamps. According to the article, they were 6p, 2p, 1p, p, p which covered the 8 p first class and 6 p second class rates. The machines were a bit fiddly to use as users had to lift the outlet flap before inserting the coin.

    The H and J took 50p coins and dispensed mixed value books of stamps. Users had to pull a knob to release the stamps after inserting the coin. As postage rates increased, later versions took 2 50p coins and dispensed a 1 book of stamps.

    I can remember seeing FMJ type SVMs around in the 1990s that took 1 coins and dispensed a 1 book of stamps but they were located in places other than post offices such as shops, hospitals, leisure centres.

    The P1 and P4 electronic SVMs were often seen inset into walls outside post offices in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

    Some larger post offices had electronic SVMs that dispensed individual stamps, like the 1712T, VSS1, and DC22, inside them in the late 1990s and early 2000s. I used to think they were quite handy to avoid waiting in queues.

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