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Thread: local sayings/different lingo

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    st austell,cornwall
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    Default local sayings/different lingo

    every county in england/wales/ireland/scotland all have a saying that means somthing like in the midlands the word brew means cup of tea,and so on. so what sayins do you have in your county's lingo and what does it mean.

    doen drekly on,(i will do the job when i am ready and not before)

    teasy as an adder,( the person in mind is'nt very happy)

    theres two lets here your's
    Last edited by Heather74; 15-09-2007 at 21:50.

  2. #2
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    kilkenny, ireland
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    Round here :

    An oinseach ( pronounced " oon-shock" ) is a stupid woman.
    Raimeis ( raw-maish ) is rubbish, as in what people talk.
    Quare can mean strange, or very as in "Quare good".
    A quarehawk is a funny or strange person.
    Ye / youse/ yez are all 2nd person plural, as in " are both of ye going to the pub ?"
    and finally;
    I'd ate a nun's ar5e through the bars of a convent gate is an expression of hunger.

    Is doen drekly on in Cornish, daubers ?
    Into the 5th Millennium & beyond...!

  3. #3
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    st austell,cornwall
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    tis dammie right me ansome(yes you are quite right)the other thing with us cornish(apart from the spelling)is we don't pronounce our h's like (he)would be e over there or ave e seen me pastie.

    another one our sayings is black as a pit, means very dark

  4. #4
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    kilkenny, ireland
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    While we don't do th's ( thirty-three becomes tirtytree and we take a "bat" when we're sweaty or tired ),
    and we drink tay and mate is what we like to ate.

    Languages, dialects,etc. were my only strong point in school.
    Into the 5th Millennium & beyond...!

  5. #5
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    Jun 2006
    Location
    Boston, Lincolnshire
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    Having recently met some friends from afar they laugh at some sayings like "slow up" when they drive too fast, "over yonder" over there, "Yon end" other end lol

  6. #6

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    eh...something that annoys me where I live...People say "have a good one" when they are parting ways. It just gets annoying after hearing it 10 times a day. I don't use it at all.
    I'd rather hear the bad truth than a good lie

  7. #7
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    Aug 2005
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    Ppl in scotland cal glaswegians 'weedgies' and glaswegians call every1 else in scotland chookters.

    Celtic fans are refered to as tims / fenians
    Rangers fans are refered to as huns / d.o.b.'s / ork's

    Other words often used are:
    bam - idiot
    boggin - dirty/disgusting
    hoose - house
    jakey - vagrant/alcoholic
    tonic - buckfast wine
    brief - car
    wean - child
    tap dancer - top floor as in a block of flats
    ya dancer - nice 1
    whit - what
    aye - yes
    close - front entrance to a tenemant
    tenemant - 3 storey block of flats
    midgey - comunal rubish bin for a tenemant
    midgey raker - a person who goes through rubbish bins

    err....al think of more

  8. #8
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    kilkenny, ireland
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    Here's what people from various parts of Ireland are called :

    Dublin - Dubs or Jackeens
    Cork - Langers
    Waterford - Blaa's
    Kilkenny - Cats
    Offaly - Biffos
    Wexford - Yellowbellies
    Tipperary - Stonethrowers.
    Into the 5th Millennium & beyond...!

  9. #9
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    here are a few more glesga (glasgow) sayings

    rerr terr - good time
    torn faced - miserable looking
    glaikit - stupid

  10. #10
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    Jan 2006
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    derbyshire
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    My husband is from Essex (poor bloke) and when we got married came to live in Derbyshire with me. 4 years later I am still translating for him. Some examples include:

    cob - bread roll
    snap - food/sandwiches
    snap tin - sandwich box
    ginnel/ jitty - path
    mash tea - brew tea
    mend the fire - put coal on the fire (took some explaining that the fire wasn't actually broken)
    firk - scratch hard
    council pop - water
    kali - sherbert
    nesh - feels the cold
    spice - sweets

    Around here people from Sheffield/Yorkshire are called dee da's and they call Derbyshire people right right's.
    If eight out of ten cats prefer whiskas, do the other two shave or wax?

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